best helmet mounted headlamp?


26 replies to this topic
  • CL13579

Posted December 14, 2008 - 06:03 PM

#21

Supporting great vendors is a good thing, but if someone is looking for a light to actually use year round, the NiteRider low jaw mount setup is the winner hands down.

I've been on many night rides over the years where dust, fog, and drizzle made the high helmet lights worthless and everyone running them had them off so they didn't have a white-out right in front of their helmet opening. The low mount NiteRider setup is still useable under all conditions, not just ideal conditions.

Then on the high helmet mount systems you can add in broken lights from hitting branches, lights knocked loose from helmets, etc. I don't know if Trail Tech has fixed the low voltage problem with their HID light setups, but I've seen them shut off many times on rides.

All the light systems have their positives and negatives, but the NiteRider setup has one thing the others do not: Year round useable lights under all conditions.

$.02

  • yamaha542

Posted December 15, 2008 - 06:45 PM

#22

All of your help is awesome! With all of this info its gunna be hard to chose. I live in Western washington, If anyone reading this wants to go night riding or riding at all let me know in a pm. Walker valley is where i ride most. I think a light that is less blue will be the way to go. exploringWA makes a good point. Rain, hail and all the GOOD weather is the tone here in western wa, Branches are a problem as well. I want to support the local guys, trail tech is where my money will most likely go. but im still undecided

  • off road rider

Posted December 22, 2008 - 07:49 AM

#23

Supporting great vendors is a good thing, but if someone is looking for a light to actually use year round, the NiteRider low jaw mount setup is the winner hands down.

I've been on many night rides over the years where dust, fog, and drizzle made the high helmet lights worthless and everyone running them had them off so they didn't have a white-out right in front of their helmet opening. The low mount NiteRider setup is still useable under all conditions, not just ideal conditions.

Then on the high helmet mount systems you can add in broken lights from hitting branches, lights knocked loose from helmets, etc. I don't know if Trail Tech has fixed the low voltage problem with their HID light setups, but I've seen them shut off many times on rides.

All the light systems have their positives and negatives, but the NiteRider setup has one thing the others do not: Year round useable lights under all conditions.

$.02


Thats an interesting take and one I have heard a few times.
Why cant you mount the Trailtech or cyclops products low? I know many racers who do exactly that. Riders do see things diff ways.. Take a look at most any Baja truck or buggy, where are there lights mounted??

  • eastreich

Posted December 22, 2008 - 08:47 AM

#24

The only things that I have to add here is to look at how the system is powered. For me, it has come down to making sure that you have two distinct power sources. I prefer to run my helmet lights off of a different power source (battery pack) instead of the same stator/bat as the one on my bike. This way if there is a failure of the bike wiring or some other unforseen problem, you are not completely stranded in the dark with no lights. One of the guys on my first 24hr team ran the cord for his Cyclops helmet light off the battery under the seat of his WR. The cord exited at the rear of the left hand numberplate. His leg caught some silt in a corner, slid back, and somehow the cord got tangled in the rear wheel. In the ensuing cord cutting, the exposed wires arced and he blew his headlight out as well. Total darkness at 11:00pm. Not good at all.

I like having low (or chin mounted) lights for trail riding. However weight is a factor. You don't want a heavy light (or two) sitting out there on your helmet when you are riding. With the low mount the lights are out of the way of low tree branches etc...

For racing (and especially at "desert" events like the Ridge) I actually like the light on top of the helmet. This location can give you way more projection (especially when standing) that helps when trying to gain those precious few seconds when reading terrain in the dark.

I am actually thinking now that I am going to keep my NiteRider skull splitter setup with their NiMh batteries and add the Cyclops Solstice to the top of my helmet to be powered by the bike (in addition to the 8" race HID on the front forks). For racing, you can never have too much light IMO!

  • CL13579

Posted December 22, 2008 - 06:02 PM

#25

The only things that I have to add here is to look at how the system is powered. For me, it has come down to making sure that you have two distinct power sources. I prefer to run my helmet lights off of a different power source (battery pack) instead of the same stator/bat as the one on my bike. This way if there is a failure of the bike wiring or some other unforseen problem, you are not completely stranded in the dark with no lights. One of the guys on my first 24hr team ran the cord for his Cyclops helmet light off the battery under the seat of his WR. The cord exited at the rear of the left hand numberplate. His leg caught some silt in a corner, slid back, and somehow the cord got tangled in the rear wheel. In the ensuing cord cutting, the exposed wires arced and he blew his headlight out as well. Total darkness at 11:00pm. Not good at all.

I like having low (or chin mounted) lights for trail riding. However weight is a factor. You don't want a heavy light (or two) sitting out there on your helmet when you are riding. With the low mount the lights are out of the way of low tree branches etc...

For racing (and especially at "desert" events like the Ridge) I actually like the light on top of the helmet. This location can give you way more projection (especially when standing) that helps when trying to gain those precious few seconds when reading terrain in the dark.

I am actually thinking now that I am going to keep my NiteRider skull splitter setup with their NiMh batteries and add the Cyclops Solstice to the top of my helmet to be powered by the bike (in addition to the 8" race HID on the front forks). For racing, you can never have too much light IMO!


I agree with the multiple light power source theory! :busted: :moon:

On my KTM 400 EXC I ran the stock headlamp lense off of the stock ac side of the stator with a 60w halogen bulb, one bar mounted Niterider HID off of the DC side of the stator, one helmet mounted Niterider HID off of the DC side of the bikes stator, and one Niterider HID off of a battery pack tossed in my backpack.

Worked GREAT and required no rewiring of the stator.

  • outthumped

Posted December 23, 2008 - 08:14 PM

#26

Trail Tech SCMR 16 HID, Spot focus
http://trailtech.net...light_kits.html
I have both the helmet and bar mount for this light... hands down the helmet light configuration wins.


Ditto:ride:

  • Powderhound

Posted December 25, 2008 - 09:26 AM

#27

I use the Cyclops dual HID helmet lights and they work very well for everything but the fastest of riding. The only time I felt like I was outrunning the lights was 5th gear stuff at Moses Lake but they have models for higher speed riding if that's what you need. Cyclops also has great support. I used their charger for my lights at the Buttstomper 24 hour which was very nice because I only have 3 batteries. I have also found that mounting the lights on the sides of my helmet works the best. I use my Cyclops with my Trail tech Extreme headlight and it's like riding during the day.





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