Removing Crankcase bearings?


8 replies to this topic
  • acarter92

Posted September 27, 2008 - 12:55 PM

#1

Well, I have to get the bearings out of my new (well, ok it's used) crankcase that I have so I can put in new ones so it's ready when I put it on my bike. This means that all the bearings i nthe case have to come out. I couldn't care less if I damage the bearing themselves (they're just getting thrown away, but I can't damage the case at all. Anyone have any suggestions on getting these pressed bearing out without screwing up my case. And while I'm on the subject how do I get the new ones back in without wrecking my case or my bearings.

Thanks in advance,
Austin

  • brad the best

Posted September 27, 2008 - 01:04 PM

#2

a puller ,or grind them down with a dremel till there is a hair left then crack them with a cold chisel they will fall out .

new ones , put them in the freezer . at work we hit them with liquid nitrogen . then tap them in with a socket that is the same size as the bearing . or a bearing installer .

note: never taken bearings out of a wr450 , these are just some ways to get out bearings . some times i just cut them off with a torch , still never cut the base material . just have to know what the metal will do .

  • acarter92

Posted September 27, 2008 - 01:08 PM

#3

Thanks, I just got done reading the article linked below. They heat the whole case and it said the bearings just fall out. Would it work for my bike (99' wr400). http://www.oldbritts.../b_removal.html

Thanks,
Austin

  • William1

Posted September 27, 2008 - 02:24 PM

#4

It might work. you heat the case (not the bearing). aluminum gets hot faster than steel and expands more, so with care, it may work. Expediency is key

Reinstall, I put the bearings in a ziplock in the freezer the day before. I heat the case in the over to 250, and the large bearings will fall in. Be sure to orient them right as you get once chance. As soon as the cold bearing touches the hot case, they warm/cool each other in a second. The smaller the bearings, you may need to have a bearing tool or socket and a hammer handy to tap it in. You have to be quick.

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  • acarter92

Posted September 27, 2008 - 02:42 PM

#5

I'm going to try it tomarrow. I'll let everybody know how it works.

Austin

  • Alternative

Posted September 27, 2008 - 08:33 PM

#6

For installation of the new bearings, if you can't find a socket the correct size I find grinding the outer face of the old bearings so they slip in without jamming is a good tool for tapping the new bearings in. I do this with wheel bearings and it works a treat.

  • brad the best

Posted September 27, 2008 - 08:40 PM

#7

Thanks, I just got done reading the article linked below. They heat the whole case and it said the bearings just fall out. Would it work for my bike (99' wr400). http://www.oldbritts.../b_removal.html

Thanks,
Austin


you might still have to tap them out with a punch and hammer .

with vehicle and machine axles i hang them from a crane heat the bearing while spinning the shaft and ya they fall off and hit you in the foot if your not carefull

  • acarter92

Posted September 28, 2008 - 12:51 PM

#8

It worked! Much to my surprise they fell right out. Instead of a keroseen heater I used my two burner camping stove. I just positioned it so the burner was right under the bearing and about 10 minutes later I would hear it fall. I would then move it over the next bearing. Both halves took about an hour. Maybe not as quick as punching them out or using a press but it sure it better for the case and takes less effort. I think an oven would be where it's at but unless you have one in your shop your going to really piss the women folk off with that nice smell of burning oil.

Austin

  • William1

Posted September 28, 2008 - 04:39 PM

#9

I use the oven when the wife is at work or shopping..... :lame:




 
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