So I tested the new changes to the 450...


8 replies to this topic
  • rdrata

Posted September 10, 2008 - 09:09 AM

#1

Jetting: From 48/165 to current 45/168; what a huge difference, minimal deceleration backfire, strong mid, minimal bogging. I think I need to play with the air screw a bit, but overall very pleased.:thumbsup:
Heat: With the change in jetting, I think Gray mentioned it may run cooler? Obviously, the temps are dropping, Come on Fall/Winter!!! But, the bike seems to be running cooler. It was a fire breathing dragon before!:worthy:
Drive: From Pro Taper (stock gearing) and DID ERT2 to Tag (still stock) and DID ERV3 - Nice transfer of power to rear wheel, drive is very smooth. Obviously don't have feedback on wearability yet. How far should the axle blocks go back? It looks like it needs it's first adjustment, but I noticed with the YZ they lay back far in the swingarm; if you take it up one (1-1/2) more link it gets really short on the swingarm:confused: no middle ground here.

  • grayracer513

Posted September 10, 2008 - 09:27 AM

#2

Setting the axle back in the arm is a good thing for the YZ, as it puts more weight on the front. With a really durable chain, it's not an issue, since I move mine very little over the course of it's life.

Also note, if this is your first aluminum framed YZF, that the chain, when properly tight, will look very loose to most people, and you'll be both advised and tempted to tighten it. Don't do so without measuring it up by the book. Too many people have overtighten the chains on these to get them to "look right" and ended up with broken hubs or worn parts because of it.

  • rdrata

Posted September 10, 2008 - 09:47 AM

#3

oh, that's interesting gray; I posted a thread some time ago about the "sweet spot" on sag for the YZ and even Dirt Rider commented on their review that the '06 had a "finicky" spot that they played with to transfer the balance to front wheel. I always thought a tighter (axle closer in) meant a sharper turning bike? Also, I set it to spec, I think it says 1-3/4~2-1/8? It's probably pushing 2-1/4 now. The DID ERV3 probably is overkill as you stated, but for $71 on Ebay, I couldn't turn it down. I did pick up a Regina RX3? for my YZ250 the other day though.

  • grayracer513

Posted September 10, 2008 - 10:04 AM

#4

The axle farther forward means a shorter wheelbase (by fractions), and taking only that in isolation, shorter things turn quicker. But the bigger issue with the YZF is front end traction while cornering, and it is improved by adding weight to the front.

Similarly, the sag has some effect on weight transfer, but also, more importantly, on steering head angle. As far as being "finicky", they are, but I prefer the term "sensitive". This sensitivity to small changes is in very large part a result of the centralization of mass philosophy executed in the bike. Everything is so close to the center that if any of it is moved, larger than expected changes in handling follow.

Moving the bars forward, or selecting a bend that places your hands forward also helps tremendously.

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  • clutchless

Posted September 10, 2008 - 11:15 AM

#5

Setting the axle back in the arm is a good thing for the YZ, as it puts more weight on the front. With a really durable chain, it's not an issue, since I move mine very little over the course of it's life.

Also note, if this is your first aluminum framed YZF, that the chain, when properly tight, will look very loose to most people, and you'll be both advised and tempted to tighten it. Don't do so without measuring it up by the book. Too many people have overtighten the chains on these to get them to "look right" and ended up with broken hubs or worn parts because of it.


hey Gray, I run my rear wheel VERY far back. should i invest in some aftermarket axel blocks to the adjuster bolt isn't out as far?

I am using stock blocks and i feel like i should do this but dont' want to spend 45.00 on some anodized bling if it's not a problem.

  • grayracer513

Posted September 10, 2008 - 12:26 PM

#6

I don't see it being that big a deal. Who do you know who ever bent or broke a bolt because of that when the axle was secured correctly?

  • rdrata

Posted September 10, 2008 - 12:40 PM

#7

thanks for the info; some would say, "..just go and ride" which holds merit, but I think getting the bike dialed in is very important also (I suppose you can go overboard there sometimes too..). I'll just have you ride it sometime Gray and tell me what you think!:thumbsup:

  • clutchless

Posted September 10, 2008 - 01:08 PM

#8

I don't see it being that big a deal. Who do you know who ever bent or broke a bolt because of that when the axle was secured correctly?


no one, but it would suck to be the first!

thanks for the insight.

  • grayracer513

Posted September 10, 2008 - 01:15 PM

#9

no one, but it would suck to be the first!

Where's your pioneering spirit? :thumbsup:

Seriously, I'd think if it was a big problem my son would have run into it long ago.





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