how to slow down yz450f


30 replies to this topic
  • XR Dad

Posted July 09, 2008 - 06:06 PM

#1

i have an 06 yz450f that i an trying to slow down for trail riding with the kids. i have already changed sprockets to 14/52 but would still like to make it a little smoother at slow speeds without slipping the clutch to much. has anyone tried a heavier flywheel and what do you think of the results? any suggestions on making this a better trail bike would be appreciated.

  • FreshDonutsCAN

Posted July 09, 2008 - 06:21 PM

#2

a rekluse would remove the need to slip so you could focus on the kids and not on making your bike slow.

When i ride with my girlfriend i have to take it slow and look back alot to make sure she has not gotten swallowed up by the terrain. As well as the stop and go nature of ridding with beginners allows for tedious clutch control. Thats my 2 cents!

  • YamaLink

Posted July 09, 2008 - 06:29 PM

#3

Definitely. A flywheel would be good. A Rekluse would be great.

a rekluse would remove the need to slip so you could focus on the kids and not on making your bike slow.

When i ride with my girlfriend i have to take it slow and look back alot to make sure she has not gotten swallowed up by the terrain. As well as the stop and go nature of ridding with beginners allows for tedious clutch control. Thats my 2 cents!



  • krackhead

Posted July 09, 2008 - 06:44 PM

#4

What is the difference between the Rekluse and hinson? They do two different things, correct?

  • edcincy

Posted July 09, 2008 - 07:05 PM

#5

I recently put a Steahly 10oz. flywheel on my 2003 450F. The flywheel will not "slow it down", but it will allow it to run at a slower speed without stalling out. Also, the immediate snappy torque is dampened a bit also, which is not really a bad thing in my book.

It's an easy mod. I went with the 10oz. complete flywheel, puller and gasket from Steahly.

  • KAS

Posted July 09, 2008 - 07:11 PM

#6

Throw a heavy flywheel on there, probably the heaviest you can get.

Or drop the big bucks for a Rekluse.

  • corndog67

Posted July 09, 2008 - 07:11 PM

#7

I just put the 9oz. Yamaha GYTR flywheel on my 06 450F, it doesn't stall as easily, it actually seems to start easier (might just be a figment of my imagination, but it is a first kick starter, nearly all the time), and it smoothed the hit out a bit. I like it.

  • grayracer513

Posted July 09, 2008 - 08:10 PM

#8

Flywheel weight is good regardless. Gearing will certainly help some, but it cuts more off the top than it adds to the bottom.

But it will still a high geared MX bike. BTW, stock gearing is 13/49 (3.76:1). 14/52 is virtually the same gearing at 3.71:1. If you want to go lower than stock, use 13/52.

A Rekluse is an auto clutch. Far from reducing clutch slippage, it does it for you automatically. Very accurately, too, and whenever needed, so it does simplify the task and free you to concentrate on other stuff.

  • cowboyona426

Posted July 10, 2008 - 05:46 AM

#9

I ride an 06 YZ in the woods with the GYT-R 9 oz. flywheel weight and it made a big improvement, but it's still a little high strung for the really tight stuff. Lower gearing would definitely be a good idea if you are running in tight stuff.
When you changed your gearing to 14/52 all you basically did was decrease the amount of drag on the chain slider by "lifting" the chain away from it. If I were you I'd throw your 13T front on, it will make a huge difference. I had my old 426 geared at 13/52 and it would go anywhere- and it didn't have a flywheel weight on it. Stock for the 426 was 14/49 so I was quite a bit lower than stock gearing.

  • XR Dad

Posted July 10, 2008 - 12:58 PM

#10

im sorry i meant 13/52, 14/52 is what was on it. does anyone know if the camshaft in the wr is the same as the yz or is it a little milder.

Visit the ThumperTalk Store for the lowest prices on motorcycle / ATV parts and accessories - Guaranteed
  • grayracer513

Posted July 10, 2008 - 01:38 PM

#11

It used to be that the camshafts themselves were identical, and the only difference was that the WR exhaust was advanced. However, the '06 and onward YZ models have new cam grinds, and the '06 and later WR's have milder cams. If you wanted to, you could install a set of stock '05 WR cams in your bike, and that would make the engine run more stably at very low RPM's. But, it will still have higher gearing and less rotating mass than a WR, and I don't think you will find the loss of power worth what little you'll gain in return. The '06 YZF runs pretty well below 5000 with a heavier flywheel.

  • JSanfilippo

Posted July 10, 2008 - 04:08 PM

#12

im sorry i meant 13/52, 14/52 is what was on it. does anyone know if the camshaft in the wr is the same as the yz or is it a little milder.


The camshafts is a good bit mellower on the WR. Its still a grunty bike, but with the stock exhaust its almost too tractable. However, going slow in first gear waiting for kids or slow riders still requires clutch in certain situations. These things like to go fast :thumbsup:

  • cowboyona426

Posted July 10, 2008 - 04:33 PM

#13

I wouldn't be too hot on putting WR cams in it. Try the flywheel weight first and see what you think. You could also put 07 WR 450F gears in it... that would make a sweet ride out of it.

  • bigred455

Posted July 10, 2008 - 08:00 PM

#14

Keep the 13 T and put a 47 or 46 rear and forget about it , a 52 did not tame it down.

  • cowboyona426

Posted July 10, 2008 - 08:29 PM

#15

Keep the 13 T and put a 47 or 46 rear and forget about it , a 52 did not tame it down.

Gearing it higher will not help the OP on the trails in any way.

  • bigred455

Posted July 10, 2008 - 09:02 PM

#16

Gearing it higher will not help the OP on the trails in any way.


His exact words ,he wants it smoother,he went to a 52 ,I tell him to go to a 47. That is not clear. Going taller on a 450 will work in the woods.

  • grayracer513

Posted July 10, 2008 - 10:59 PM

#17

What he said was, he wants to go slower and slip the clutch less. Can you explain how going two teeth higher than stock gearing is going to help him accomplish that?

  • cowboyona426

Posted July 11, 2008 - 07:58 AM

#18

His exact words ,he wants it smoother,he went to a 52 ,I tell him to go to a 47. That is not clear. Going taller on a 450 will work in the woods.

I don't know what the woods are like out in Joisey, but in the west taller gearing in the woods is not a good idea.

  • bigred455

Posted July 11, 2008 - 01:34 PM

#19

What he said was, he wants to go slower and slip the clutch less. Can you explain how going two teeth higher than stock gearing is going to help him accomplish that?



You explain to me, how are you going to make the motor smoother coming off the bottom,by going up teeth in the rear.Yes I do know it requires more clutch work going taller in the rear,but he wants it smoother . If you are only working with sprockets going up to a 52 rear is not going to make it smoother. Please lets not debate on something so SIMPLE.:thumbsup:

  • DGXR

Posted July 11, 2008 - 01:44 PM

#20

Going up on the rear and down on the front sprocket will lower the overall gear ratio, so he will be able to go more slowly without stalling the bike. A slipper clutch and flywheel weights make it a bit "smoother" but I honestly don't know if it is even possible to make these racing thumpers smoother in first gear, they just pop out the torque so quickly. Increasing teeth in the rear is not going taller, it's going shorter. When he said he went up from the stock 13 to 14T on the front makes the final drive taller, counter-productive in this case.





Related Content

 
x

Join Our Community!

Even if you don't want to post, registered members get access to tools that make finding & following the good stuff easier.

If you enjoyed reading about "" here in the ThumperTalk archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join ThumperTalk today!

The views and opinions expressed on this page are strictly those of the author, and have not been reviewed or approved by ThumperTalk.