revalve really that important?


10 replies to this topic
  • Slinkyman16

Posted June 19, 2008 - 01:55 PM

#1

is a suspension revalve really all that important on the new yzfs? im about to get my suspension rebuilt due to the amount of time i have on it.. and was wondering if i should get a revalve for my weight.. im a bit over my adverage weight right now. but plan on getting back down to 200 pounds in the next month or so..

anyway my riding skill level is about novice on the track.. and am pretty content on the way my bike handles. is a revalve going to be a big improvement over stock.. ive always been the type of rider that will ride anything given to me and learn to adapt to it, in order to go fast. im just really torn.. a revalve will be around 600 bucks.. and a rebuild 230.. is the extra cash really worth the "possible" improvements.

thanks

josh

  • grayracer513

Posted June 19, 2008 - 02:03 PM

#2

Read:

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http://www.thumperta...ad.php?t=646080

http://www.thumperta...ad.php?t=659483

  • 080

Posted June 20, 2008 - 06:03 AM

#3

Keep in mind a revalve and set up for your weight (springs etc..) are two different birds. If your over 200lbs and have not changed out to heavier springs (especially for motocross) the the suspension is already not performing to its potential. Being that your a novice rider on the track I would say proper spring rate and a revalve will be very noticable and will work better than what you have now. The oil that gray linked to is very interesting and the feedback has been nothing but good especially with the piston mod (I will be doing this shortly).

  • krackhead

Posted June 20, 2008 - 06:21 AM

#4

New springs is a must, I weigh 205 and they made a huge differnece in the handling of the bike and cornering. I chcked into revalves and I have found unless you know exactly what you want your suspension to do you are wasting your money. Most of them reccomended learning how to dial in your own clickers before getting a revalve

  • llamaface

Posted June 20, 2008 - 08:06 AM

#5

The oil that gray linked to is very interesting and the feedback has been nothing but good


except for the warm up time and fading that has been noted by qualified testers.

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  • grayracer513

Posted June 20, 2008 - 08:43 AM

#6

Keep in mind a revalve and set up for your weight (springs etc..) are two different birds. If your over 200lbs and have not changed out to heavier springs (especially for motocross) the the suspension is already not performing to its potential.

This is very true, and in fact, unless the spring rates are a good match to your weight and the type of riding you do, anything else is kind of a waste of time. At 200 lbs, you're just over the top of the range covered by the stock rates.

except for the warm up time and fading that has been noted by qualified testers.

Warm up time is a reality, but it isn't really a very big problem. I installed push button bleeders, and I just stop, roll the bike back against the brakes, and vent them. After that, it's not an issue. As far as fade goes, I've run the bike for two+ hours at a time and encountered none of it. Dave himself did have a problem, but if you followed that whole thread, he also noted later that the oil he was running when that happened was over a year old, and had well over 100 hours on it.

  • KAS

Posted June 20, 2008 - 09:11 PM

#7

For MX, proper spring rates and setup are fine IMO.

  • BBrown626

Posted June 21, 2008 - 03:29 PM

#8

is a suspension revalve really all that important on the new yzfs? im about to get my suspension rebuilt due to the amount of time i have on it.. and was wondering if i should get a revalve for my weight.. im a bit over my adverage weight right now. but plan on getting back down to 200 pounds in the next month or so..

anyway my riding skill level is about novice on the track.. and am pretty content on the way my bike handles. is a revalve going to be a big improvement over stock.. ive always been the type of rider that will ride anything given to me and learn to adapt to it, in order to go fast. im just really torn.. a revalve will be around 600 bucks.. and a rebuild 230.. is the extra cash really worth the "possible" improvements.

thanks

josh


If you have basic mechanical skills (you can check your valves) service your suspension yourself and save a lot of money! Don't be afraid. Forks are easy. Order the bushings and new seals from oem.thumpertalk.com. Use the race tech calculator to figure out what springs you need and order them and oil from TT. Consider the new oil from smartperformance.com (they may have the bushings and seals too). If you do need any tools, check rockymountain's Tusk brand--great price and good tools.

If you try to tackle the shock service: I was about ready to buy all the nitrogen charging tools from a welding supply shop for about $375 when I found a local off-road shop that uses the same equipment for truck shocks. They charge $5 for charging a motorcycle shock.

Rebuild is probably not necessary, just service and springs for your weight.

  • Dr.Crankenstien

Posted June 21, 2008 - 04:29 PM

#9

Get the springs for your correct weight.The bike will be more balanced and working where it should be.
Then see if you like it.If not experiment with clickers and oil heights.If that does not get it go for the revalve.But try doing your suspension in steps to see what is working or not.In my opinion the YAMAHA KYB stuff '06-'08 is the best out there and does not need alot to get it working REAL GOOD.

Good Luck:thumbsup:

  • grayracer513

Posted June 21, 2008 - 05:17 PM

#10

If you try to tackle the shock service: I was about ready to buy all the nitrogen charging tools from a welding supply shop for about $375 when I found a local off-road shop that uses the same equipment for truck shocks. They charge $5 for charging a motorcycle shock.


The snag there is that you need a little pressure in the bladder during the bleed operation. But, you could use air for that, then have the bladder purged and refilled with nitrogen.

  • BBrown626

Posted June 21, 2008 - 08:09 PM

#11

The snag there is that you need a little pressure in the bladder during the bleed operation. But, you could use air for that, then have the bladder purged and refilled with nitrogen.


I considered that and you pose a potential work around. I might just buy the equipment for the convenience of being able to do the work when I want to and without any running around. Or I might be able to find a small tank with a low pressure regulator. Then I could use my existing hose and fittings for that imprecise portion of the servicing. Hmmm





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