Yamaha lowering: WR426/450F YamaLink TT pricing


10 replies to this topic
  • YamaLink

Posted May 15, 2008 - 02:34 PM

#1

Hi, all,

Today we officially became a sponsor of the WR/YZ 250F and WR400/426/450 forums. We've sent Bryan our banner, and it should be up shortly.

We'd like to offer everyone a ThumperTalk price. Good until June 15, 2008, the TT price of the YamaLink will be $199.

The YamaLink fits 2002 through 2008 WR250F, WR426/450F, YZ250F and YZ426/450F. Featuring two grease zerks, oem-sized bearings, spacers and oil seals, the rear of the bike is lowered up to 1.75 inches on every model and year listed except for the 2008 YZ250F/YZ450F; that's 1.25 inches.

And as our signature states, we give a donation to Blue Ribbon Coalition for each sale (we've been open 2 weeks, and today was our first paypal payment to BRC).

Check out the site, and email us direct if you have any questions. We're excited to help support TT and the Yamaha riders.

Sincerely,
Carol and Dan

  • RickSanson

Posted May 15, 2008 - 05:35 PM

#2

Welcome!

Let's get started...

I ride a 2007 WR450F fully re-sprung and re-valved per Jeremy Wilkey, MX-Tech. I am 5'6" tall and barely reach the ground on this bike. The forks are about 4mm into the triple-clamp so the bike is NOT setup for a short guy. I'm a "C" rider but getting better. My bike handles perfectly most of the time!

I know about lowering links but have never experienced a lowered bike. I've always been short and dirt bikes have always been tall. I often fall because I don't reach the ground and I attribute falling more than not to a height disadvantage. Yes, I know about Ricky Carmichael.

What am I going to experience using your link? Is lowering ride height going to be enough of a benefit to off-set bottoming out? Would I do anything to compensate for the decrease in suspension travel? What about higher speed handling (I ride woods!)? I'm fairly suspension savvy but still have a lot to learn.

I'm interested in trying but not interested in wasting my money if I don't like it. I do accept the collective wisdom here so if the reviews are generally positive I'll buy, if not well...

Once again, Welcome! And as a small business owner myself I wish you wild success!

  • seamus1618

Posted May 15, 2008 - 06:21 PM

#3

I put one of these on my 2000 WR400.
Even though the manufacturer doesn't advertise this year model as being compatible, it is.
It lowers the bike a little more on the 2000 year model, about 2", but when I called and talked to the manufacturer before I ordered it they told me this.
It does change the handling of the bike but it didn't change it bad enough for me to put the stock link back in.
I tried to adjust the preload load on my spring but couldn't get the results I wanted, so I put it as close back to stock as I could.
I just changed the compression and rebound adjustments and got a pretty good ride out of it.
I also slid the forks up in the trees.
The bike sits further to the back now, which isn't necessarily a bad thing for the style of riding I do, trails and dirt roads.
Having the bike sit further back gives me a lot more stability in sand and loose stuff than what I had before.
However one downside of the link is that I do rub on my rear fender quite a bit.
When jumping small erosion breaks it is pretty common for me to rub the fender.
I keep thinking there is a way to fix this problem, but I haven't found it yet without making the suspension so stiff that the bike wants to buck you off.
I would really like some advice from someone who tunes suspension on how to compensate for this.
I know my preload is really messed up because I think it was around 3" or 3.5" but by taking more preload out, the seat height rises thus negating the point of buying the link in the first place.
Anyway, I hope this helps answer some questions people might have before buying this product.
I'm 5'7" weigh 145lbs. and I would buy this product again knowing what I know now.
The benefits outweighed the negatives for me.

  • YamaLink

Posted May 15, 2008 - 06:23 PM

#4

Rick,

Thanks for the welcome, and yeah, let's get started! Without knowing how your bike is re-sprung or re-valved, here's how the YamaLink will help you touch the ground.

The ride height of your 07 WR450F will be determined by the amount of race sag: at factory recommended sag there will be up to 1.75 inches lowering. At 3.25 or 3.5 inches of sag - what we recommend for aggressive riding and those whose goal is more than just getting their boots on terra firma - the laden height of the rear will obviously be less.

Most lowering links put more leverage on the rear spring and make the rear more compliant on the small stuff. The YamaLink puts MORE leverage, and may require a heavier rear spring to help prevent bottoming if a rider is very heavy and/or very, very aggressive. This goes back to my not knowing how your bike has been re-valved or re-sprung.

What I'm going to tell you next makes many say "what?!" There is NO decrease in suspension travel with the YamaLink. A lowering link such as ours moves the rear wheel up farther AND at a different rate. That means your WR will be more plush on the soft stuff (this lends to better feel over braking and acceleration bumps, and it helps with traction) and it means more aggressive riders will move through travel easier. We recommend turning in the rear shock's "big knob" (we refer to it as the Big Knob for this discussion because some call it the slow-speed compression knob while some refer to it as the high-speed depending on if they are speaking of the piston speed or not. I digress) clockwise to increase damping and maybe going in one click on rebound.

If a rider is bottoming a YamaLink even at 3.25 sag then we presume they were bottoming with the stock link at factory recommended sag and would've required a heavier spring for the stock setup. Again, not knowing how your bike was reworked.

On a related note, a bike often "loses" travel when a tuner goes internally and changes settings or if a lowering link puts less progression on a shock.

As a woods rider, I would recommend, too, sliding your forks up in the clamps at least 7mm from stock and adjusting based on preference. We've found that, depending on rear sag and type of terrain, about 7mm to 10mm - give or take based on preference - works wonderfully.

Hopefully this helps you out. Please email us direct, PM or continue posting on here if you'd like more info. And thank you for the well wishes, fellow small business owner. :thumbsup:

  • ETP

Posted May 16, 2008 - 05:45 AM

#5

I looked at these links a while back and ended up having my bike lowered by modifying the suspension.
What scared me off from getting the link was the idea that soon or later I was going to hit something hard enough where the rear tire would bottom out very hard against the fender at high speed.
The big question for me is, after mounting the link, can the suspension be set up so bottoming is back to stock potential, and then, will the ride be too stiff?

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  • YamaLink

Posted May 16, 2008 - 06:04 AM

#6

ETP,

We get asked about bottoming out against the rear fender; second most next to "will I lose suspension travel."

Without knowing your weight, riding style or what was done to your suspension.... A link with more leverage will not only make your bike more supple on the small, teeth rattling bumps but it will also make it go through the travel faster. YamaLink users have had great results with turning in their rear shocks high speed compression knob (the big knob) slightly clockwise, ie, increasing damping. You don't have to go in a lot. Just slightly. Then maybe go in on rebound one click to help slow down the extra return of energy.

On a related note of hitting the fender, and not to compare pro mx racers with us mere mortals, if you look at the underside of almost every bike at an outdoor national you will see tire marks on the fender. Big gnarly black streaks! It's not just because they're jumping higher/landing harder/etc., it's because many are using one-off linkage. An aftermarket link, whether it's a kouba link or yamalink or super duper factory link, actually gives the rear wheel more distance to travel. And this means it's usually going to kiss that rear fender a lot easier.

For someone looking purely to lower the rear of their bike, the YamaLink is without question a great option. Would we recommend a 1.75 inch lowering rocker for a gap jumping triple clearing racer? Nope (on a related note, we have put on 1" lowering links on pro mx and WORCS racers - tall guys at that - because they waned a more supple and planted feel, but that's a whole other thread).

Hopefully this helps. Please feel free to ask more questions or comments.
Thanks!

I looked at these links a while back and ended up having my bike lowered by modifying the suspension.
What scared me off from getting the link was the idea that soon or later I was going to hit something hard enough where the rear tire would bottom out very hard against the fender at high speed.
The big question for me is, after mounting the link, can the suspension be set up so bottoming is back to stock potential, and then, will the ride be too stiff?



  • Birdy426

Posted May 16, 2008 - 09:45 AM

#7

I, too, am vertically challenged at 5'6", and frequently drop my 426 wen there just isn't any ground that close to the seat.

What about cornering? Turnnig isn't the 400/426's strong suit to begin with. It would seem to me that lowering the rear of the bike an inch and 3/4, while dropping the forks only about 1/2 inch (which is about all the geometry of the tubes will allow) would really kick out the rake. While this would be great for high speed stability, it would make low speed stability a bit more squirrwly, and also make turning even worse...

Your thoghts?

  • YamaLink

Posted May 16, 2008 - 08:03 PM

#8

Birdy426,

Hi. It's a common belief that the forks must be raised in the triple clamps the same amount that a rear suspension is lowered. For almost every bike made, this is not true.

Why? Changes in the rake and trail affect the bike's geometry and handling at a different rate than changes in the rear suspension.

Suspension set up is about fine tuning and knowing that there is no perfect answer. One rider just wants to touch the ground. Period. They will set sag at factory recommended settings, get maximum lowering and be happy. Another rider is more aggressive and will blow through the travel due to the increase in leverage at factory sag; that's why we recommend sag at 3.25 inches and dialing it in to preference. Too much sag and the front end pushes.

Same goes with the forks. Slam them all the way up to the handlebars. You will probably find out it's oversteering and you're headshaking. Now lower the forks a bit and a bit more until you have a very good setup. Some of the best turning and stable bikes - overall - have been with rear ends lowered 1.5 or 1.75 inches and the forks raised "just" 1 inch (the rake/trail affecting geometry at different rate).

Hope this helps you out. Please feel free to ask or comment more. We're glad for the input!


I, too, am vertically challenged at 5'6", and frequently drop my 426 wen there just isn't any ground that close to the seat.

What about cornering? Turnnig isn't the 400/426's strong suit to begin with. It would seem to me that lowering the rear of the bike an inch and 3/4, while dropping the forks only about 1/2 inch (which is about all the geometry of the tubes will allow) would really kick out the rake. While this would be great for high speed stability, it would make low speed stability a bit more squirrwly, and also make turning even worse...

Your thoghts?



  • Birdy426

Posted May 16, 2008 - 08:52 PM

#9

Yamalink-
Thanks for the reply. I haven't been able to slide the forks up enought o oversteer yet...I think I will put this on my birthday list (June) and give it a shot...

  • YamaLink

Posted May 16, 2008 - 09:14 PM

#10

If your bday falls after the month-long ThumperTalk special pricing we'll still give it to ya. Just remind us if/when you buy, and we'll refund the difference.

Have a good weekend of riding!

Yamalink-
Thanks for the reply. I haven't been able to slide the forks up enought o oversteer yet...I think I will put this on my birthday list (June) and give it a shot...



  • YamaLink

Posted May 20, 2008 - 10:44 AM

#11

Thanks to all for the inquiries and questions. To help us with the member pricing, would you be so kind as to mention "TT" or "ThumperTalk" when you email or place your order.

This way you don't have to say "hey, I paid full price, and you said I wouldn't...," and you get credited with the difference ASAP.

Again, thank you very much!




 
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