Powder Coating my YZ450?


14 replies to this topic
  • motorider66

Posted May 05, 2008 - 06:12 PM

#1

I was thinking of powder coating my 06 YZ450F frame jet black.
To give a a little touch, a little contrast from all the aluminium and gray color.

Was curious what everyone thinks of this?

  • isobareng

Posted May 05, 2008 - 06:28 PM

#2

It is a great way to have a very durable finish. I have not seen a frame done but several items at work have been powder coated and the finish stands up to a significant amount of abuse.

D

  • nap__kxf

Posted May 05, 2008 - 06:32 PM

#3

all i know is that as soon as i can, my 07 is getting torn down to swing arm and frame and ima send those bad boys in for some black powder coating.

tmac25 did it to his bike, not sure what year but he had the hurricane graphics on there and it was siiiiick

  • motorider66

Posted May 05, 2008 - 06:55 PM

#4

Did you know of some pictures of this done?

  • intensem1rider

Posted May 05, 2008 - 06:56 PM

#5

Wouldn't anodizing be better for the frame? Just curious.

  • swatdoc

Posted May 05, 2008 - 08:58 PM

#6

check out my YZ in my garage. Try to have your PC person bake your frame at 300-325 degrees. SOME people say that aluminum can change it's heat treating and strength at 350 and up, so keep it below just to be safe. Also, to make it look better, file/sand down all the casting seams on the frame first. Anodizing won't look as good, as it will show EVERY flaw or defect in the metal, and the welds and cast pieces take the anodizing different and the color will be a little off.

  • nolimits720

Posted May 05, 2008 - 09:18 PM

#7

post up a pic of your bike and i can photo shop it for you so you know what it will look like.

Visit the ThumperTalk Store for the lowest prices on motorcycle / ATV parts and accessories - Guaranteed
  • Birdy426

Posted May 05, 2008 - 09:20 PM

#8

check out my YZ in my garage. Try to have your PC person bake your frame at 300-325 degrees. SOME people say that aluminum can change it's heat treating and strength at 350 and up, so keep it below just to be safe. Also, to make it look better, file/sand down all the casting seams on the frame first. Anodizing won't look as good, as it will show EVERY flaw or defect in the metal, and the welds and cast pieces take the anodizing different and the color will be a little off.


For Aluminum, you want 250F MAX cure on the powder. Aluminum heat treating DOES begin to change at as low as 225F depending on the alloy and current heat treat. For any high strength alloy, 350F is too high.

  • swatdoc

Posted May 05, 2008 - 10:50 PM

#9

Birdy - do you have an online source for your info on the temps you mention? I had read stuff online that said 350, not 250, so I'd lke to check out what your sourses say.
thanks

P.S. - still not sure how big a deal it is - the 2 powdercoating places over here normally PC these frames at 400, and have done numerous MX bikes, with no one having cracked or broken a frame.

  • Birdy426

Posted May 05, 2008 - 11:31 PM

#10

From MIL HDBK 5h (Metals Design Properties for Aerospace and Defencse) Section 1 paragraph 3.1.2.1.8 — In general, the strengths of aluminum alloys decrease and toughness increases with increase in temperature and with time at temperature above room temperature; the effect is generally greatest over the temperature range from 212 to 400F.

As these frames are made from a combination of cast, extruded (wrought) and billet chunks, and are welded together, the likely alloys are either a 5xxx series or a 6xxx series, heat treated after fabrication and welding. Figure 3.5.1.3.1a from mIL HDBK 5h shows a plot of remaining tensile strength vs exposure temperature. For 5052 (a common 5xxx alloy), the material retains slightly less than 80% of it's ultimate tensile strength when exposed to a constant temperature of 300 F for between 1/2 and 10 hours. Similar plots are shown for yield strength and Modulus of Elasticity (a measure of stiffness). The 6xxx series alloys lose just a bit more than the 5xxx alloys. That's why we use a 200F-225F service limit for designing with aluminum in the aerospace industry, unless you're talking about one shot short service life missiles, or you design to fully annealed (weakest state) values.

Here's the link to MIL HDBK 5...

http://www.grantades...ea/Mil/mil5.htm

We did a fair amount of testing of both 350F cure powders and 250F cure powders as a replacement for primers on aerospace parts. We found that as far as corrosion prevention (the main purpose of primer on aircraft) there was no noticable performance difference. Likewise for durability of the finish. There was, however, a 15-20 percent reduction in mechanical properties for the 350F cure parts (as we expected based on the MIL Handbook).

There may be adequate strength in the frames to withstand the drop in properties from higher temp cures, but I wouldn't risk it without talking to Yamaha first and getting a read from their Engineering department.

  • swatdoc

Posted May 05, 2008 - 11:40 PM

#11

good info - thanks!

  • yamahacrazy_310

Posted May 06, 2008 - 01:10 AM

#12

Did you know of some pictures of this done?

Not mine.
Posted Image

  • RJB

Posted May 06, 2008 - 03:03 AM

#13

Did you know of some pictures of this done?


Check out SwatDoc's posts here - awesome looking bike

  • KJ790

Posted May 06, 2008 - 05:44 AM

#14

Not mine.
Posted Image


That is an experimental carbon fiber frame that was tested in Europe.

  • Ga426owner

Posted May 06, 2008 - 10:04 AM

#15

That is an experimental carbon fiber frame that was tested in Europe.



with Solva Suspension........interesting





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