Installing crankshaft and bearing using heat/cold


4 replies to this topic
  • segge

Posted April 07, 2008 - 08:12 PM

#1

Hi,

I just returned from the local machine shop in Tripoli to press out the crankshaft and remove the bearing from the crank on my XR650. I don't have the special tools to press the the bearing back into the left half of the case or pull the shaft through.

I've read about putting the case in the oven and the bearings into the freezer. People suggest heating the case to about 150ish degrees, my question is will the heat damage the countershaft, crankshaft and gearshift spindle oil seals? If I remove the oil seals Im afraid I will damage them.

My plans is to heat the case, freeze the bearing and install. Then heat the case with the installed bearing and then install the frozen crankshaft.

Is this dumb. Thanks for the help. I have the only Honda 650 in country and noone to go to for help. Would rather not return to the machine shop, working conditions on the scarey side.

Thanks

  • martinfan30

Posted April 07, 2008 - 08:27 PM

#2

Hi,

I just returned from the local machine shop in Tripoli to press out the crankshaft and remove the bearing from the crank on my XR650. I don't have the special tools to press the the bearing back into the left half of the case or pull the shaft through.

I've read about putting the case in the oven and the bearings into the freezer. People suggest heating the case to about 150ish degrees, my question is will the heat damage the countershaft, crankshaft and gearshift spindle oil seals? If I remove the oil seals Im afraid I will damage them.

My plans is to heat the case, freeze the bearing and install. Then heat the case with the installed bearing and then install the frozen crankshaft.

Is this dumb. Thanks for the help. I have the only Honda 650 in country and noone to go to for help. Would rather not return to the machine shop, working conditions on the scarey side.

Thanks



This is a common method of reinstalling bearings, cranks, etc. If you dont go over 150-200 degrees, I dont think the seals are in danger.

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  • segge

Posted April 08, 2008 - 02:23 AM

#3

Thanks. I lff find an accurate thermometer and give it a shot tonight.

Steve
www.egge.us

  • pwrpapa

Posted April 08, 2008 - 02:51 AM

#4

I've never had much luck with that method,It doesn't work that great just get them pressed in by a shop.
I have a 55 ton Ramco press an it's already paid for it self from all the bearing an crank work I do.
For sleeve work I will heat the jug to 400 an freeze the sleeve but you still have to press it in.

  • cleonard

Posted April 08, 2008 - 11:13 AM

#5

I agree that the heat and cold method may not work here. Usually the seals can take at least 250F.

Many times you can get by by tapping on the outside of the bearing. However, on some jobs like this one a press might be the only way. It doesn't always take a shop press. I've had luck using large pieces of wood as levers or even a car hydraulic car jack as a make shift press.





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