Very stupid question, but what way do you tighten spokes?


22 replies to this topic
  • William1

Posted April 04, 2008 - 05:37 AM

#21

I too, use the 'ping' method on old wheels. There is too much stiction in the spoke nipples on an old used wheel to have a spoke torque wrench be accurate. However, when I build a wheel myself, I use anti-seize on the spoke threads. I use the spoke torque wrench. It does do a better job than by ear. To do this on an old wheel, you would need to remove the spokes, chase them with a tap and die, anti-seize. Ugh, I need a nap!

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  • grayracer513

Posted April 04, 2008 - 06:25 AM

#22

when I build a wheel myself, I use anti-seize on the spoke threads. I use the spoke torque wrench. It does do a better job than by ear.

I use paraffin (from any grocery store, with the Mason jars). It's preferable to anti-sieze because there is no oil base to sneak into the wheel and attack the rim strip/tube/tire, and because it's a bit more temporary.

I will use a spoke torque wrench to get the spokes in the right range of tension, but even on a new wheel, I use tone to balance the tension. IMO, it's a more accurate indication of the actual tension on the spokes.

  • William1

Posted April 04, 2008 - 08:04 AM

#23

Gray, the paraffin idea is a good one. Also will 'seal' the spoke threads a little. Next wheel, I'll give that a go.





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