Hand gaurds


29 replies to this topic
  • xBRIANx

Posted March 19, 2008 - 09:33 PM

#21

Yeah, I just installed the Acerbis hand guards. Havent gotton the luxury of testing them out yet, due to very shitty weather in ohio. But the definatly look sweet. :-)

  • wildone5

Posted March 20, 2008 - 05:23 AM

#22

I ride in the tight woods of Louisiana, don,t even think about going with out full hand guards. If you play on the track take them or leave them.

  • byggd

Posted March 20, 2008 - 05:39 AM

#23

Hey all

Does anyone have any experiance with hand gaurd's from Moose Racing??? I just got a set made from titanium and not really sure how to install them. I am new to riding (just started a year ago). Any help would be great...

I installed the moose racing mini's on my wife's ttr125le. They seem pretty strong but I did have to bend them a bit to make them fit.
Posted Image

  • Vegemite_luva

Posted March 20, 2008 - 09:46 AM

#24

Get hand guards! I broke my hand by clipping my hand and handlebar on a tree(if I was literally 1" over to the left I would have missed the tree). I ended up having to get surgery to have pins installed. Months on not being able to use my right hand(and I am right handed). Then a second surgery to have the pins removed. Then I had three months of physical therapy. This entire process was not fun and I could not ride for like five months.

  • Stickshift

Posted March 20, 2008 - 03:14 PM

#25

Guys,

This is a subject I can speak to as I learned this lesson the hard way. Last October I was riding in the annual AMA dual sport ride in Terlingua, Texas (Big Bend area). It was the 5th year in a row I made this ride with my buddies, we log around 300 miles per year on this ride and I'd never even gotten a scratch out there. Pretty amazing considering how rough the terrain is - rocky, sandy, hills, lots of washouts etc. The dust is always an issue as there are lots of riders. A washout snuck up on me, didn't see it until the last second, we've been trained to always punch it and bring the front end up to hit a washout, never panic and brake into one...so I punched it, determined to pull this out and keep on going. I did not manage to get the front end up (too little time and back tire worn too much) so I spudded my front wheel into the washout, of course I did an instant endo. I was probably going about 20-25 mph, not all that fast, so I very gracefully rolled on the ground and popped up at the end. I knew my hand felt a little funny but I was all pumped up, so I ran over to pick my bike up and keep on going. As soon as I tried to pick up the bike I knew my right arm was hurt. Yow - my arm was BENT, with close to a compound fracture! When I went over the bars I must have still been hanging on to the throttle trying to pull it out, I broke both my radius and ulna (I didn't used to know the names of your two forearm bones, either). Two surgeries later, I have a titanium plate and 13 screws holding my radius back together (good as new), my ulna still gives me a little trouble but it's pretty OK, 5 months since the eat. This is a very real possibility for any dirt bike rider with bark busters.

Barkbusters are essential for riding in the woods, they save your hands from getting pinched and smashed by trees, and they keep trees from compressing your front brake lever. They protect your controls - levers, throttle tube, grips - and make you feel pretty bullet proof. Woods riders rarely go over the bars, so life is good.

For motorcross riding, or for desert riding, bark busters are a BAD IDEA. I used to think hand guards were worthless since they are so flimsy, I now realize this is part of what's good about them. If you go over the bars, the hand guards will move out of the way and not break your arm. They also do a good job breaking the wind (important on dual sport rides in the wind and rain), and they will deflect roost thrown at you by the guy in front of you. They are not much good in the woods, as you can get your hands smashed, etc.

Hand guards do not protect your controls very well as discussed above, so you need to take that into consideration. Either run unbreakable (hinged) levers (expensive, and usually require special perches), or pack a spare pair of stock levers in the event of a crash (cheap way to go - us dual sport guys pack all kinds of tools and parts anyway). You need to get some bar end protectors to fill the holes in the end of your grips (since you normally run bark busters), and to protect the end of your throttle tube from damage in case of a spill. Voila - you're ready for the desert or track, you can re-install your trusty barkbusters when you get ready to head back to the woods.

PS I just go my new hand guards via UPS as I'm prepping for a ride in the Texas hill country where there are no trees - I'm practicing what I preach!

Keep on rocking,

Stickshift

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  • Stickshift

Posted March 20, 2008 - 06:16 PM

#26

Guys,

This is a subject I can speak to as I learned this lesson the hard way. Last October I was riding in the annual AMA dual sport ride in Terlingua, Texas (Big Bend area). It was the 5th year in a row I made this ride with my buddies, we log around 300 miles per year on this ride and I'd never even gotten a scratch out there. Pretty amazing considering how rough the terrain is - rocky, sandy, hills, lots of washouts etc. The dust is always an issue as there are lots of riders. A washout snuck up on me, didn't see it until the last second, we've been trained to always punch it and bring the front end up to hit a washout, never panic and brake into one...so I punched it, determined to pull this out and keep on going. I did not manage to get the front end up (too little time and back tire worn too much) so I spudded my front wheel into the washout, of course I did an instant endo. I was probably going about 20-25 mph, not all that fast, so I very gracefully rolled on the ground and popped up at the end. I knew my hand felt a little funny but I was all pumped up, so I ran over to pick my bike up and keep on going. As soon as I tried to pick up the bike I knew my right arm was hurt. Yow - my arm was BENT, with close to a compound fracture! When I went over the bars I must have still been hanging on to the throttle trying to pull it out, I broke both my radius and ulna (I didn't used to know the names of your two forearm bones, either). Two surgeries later, I have a titanium plate and 13 screws holding my radius back together (good as new), my ulna still gives me a little trouble but it's pretty OK, 5 months since the eat. This is a very real possibility for any dirt bike rider with bark busters.

Barkbusters are essential for riding in the woods, they save your hands from getting pinched and smashed by trees, and they keep trees from compressing your front brake lever. They protect your controls - levers, throttle tube, grips - and make you feel pretty bullet proof. Woods riders rarely go over the bars, so life is good.

For motorcross riding, or for desert riding, bark busters are a BAD IDEA. I used to think hand guards were worthless since they are so flimsy, I now realize this is part of what's good about them. If you go over the bars, the hand guards will move out of the way and not break your arm. They also do a good job breaking the wind (important on dual sport rides in the wind and rain), and they will deflect roost thrown at you by the guy in front of you. They are not much good in the woods, as you can get your hands smashed, etc.

Hand guards do not protect your controls very well as discussed above, so you need to take that into consideration. Either run unbreakable (hinged) levers (expensive, and usually require special perches), or pack a spare pair of stock levers in the event of a crash (cheap way to go - us dual sport guys pack all kinds of tools and parts anyway). You need to get some bar end protectors to fill the holes in the end of your grips (since you normally run bark busters), and to protect the end of your throttle tube from damage in case of a spill. Voila - you're ready for the desert or track, you can re-install your trusty barkbusters when you get ready to head back to the woods.

PS I just go my new hand guards via UPS as I'm prepping for a ride in the Texas hill country where there are no trees - I'm practicing what I preach!

Keep on rocking,

Stickshift

  • C-P

Posted March 20, 2008 - 07:48 PM

#27

Hey all

Does anyone have any experiance with hand gaurd's from Moose Racing??? I just got a set made from titanium and not really sure how to install them. I am new to riding (just started a year ago). Any help would be great...


Ah yeah, they're good. Tough as hell. Same thing as the Enduro Engineering guards, I think EE makes for Moose...

Use barkbusters if there's a chance you'll be banging your bars into trees...I've seen guys hit the brake levers on trees as they're trying to get past - that creates some interesting moves. And while I've never had the problem, it sounds like you should really try hard not to endo!

  • CGNKatana

Posted March 20, 2008 - 09:02 PM

#28

Thanks for the relplies rabbityracer and byggd

I bought these cause they looked tough as hell and was scratching my head when installing them untill I realilized that I had the wrong ones. Didn't get the "pro taper" set. I should have the proper ones in a few weeks. Will keep you posted.

  • AnimalDan

Posted March 23, 2008 - 08:55 PM

#29

After over 10 years of trail riding I ALMOST took serious injury to the right wrist yesterday. I run with Cycra probend, triple clamp mounts. Came up on a snow bank and went to take it as usual, but this one was deeper and softer. 20 feet into it the front wheel hit a soft spot and buried. The bike and I did a complete 180 endo. Slow enough so that the bike barely came over the top. Back of the right wrist has one hell of a knot from the plastic handguard shield.
Of course, they've saved me from many more injuries than this single one.

  • DeeCee

Posted March 24, 2008 - 12:38 AM

#30

I ride desert and run Acerbis hand guards for protection against brush mainly.

I find the best way of saving levers in the event of a crash is to simply have the lever clamp loose enough so it can just be turned by hand i.e. do not have them done up tight. If they are firm enough so it takes a little bit of effort to turn them by hand, you will find they roll on the bars in the event of a crash and do not usually bend.




 
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