Deep snow riding


5 replies to this topic
  • jsaffordwr426

Posted March 13, 2008 - 03:19 PM

#1

so i was just thinking about taking my WR 426 out for a ride around the house...But i have about 3-3.5 feet of snow on the ground right now. So i was wondering what you guys thought about studding the tires? or do you even think the bike will make it through that much snow? i have decent tires on it right now, and i'm wondering if i stud the tires with sheet metal screws if it will shorten the life of the tire in the summer after i remove the screws?

any suggestions would be great!

  • kskyles

Posted March 13, 2008 - 03:22 PM

#2

check out the last 4 or 5 pages of the "how to fit a WR450 in a mailbox" thread. Frostbite has studded tires and a ski on the front of his bike up in the arctic.

he's got a lot of info on cold weather setup on his '07.

  • jsaffordwr426

Posted March 13, 2008 - 03:24 PM

#3

thanks

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  • Frostbite

Posted March 13, 2008 - 06:48 PM

#4

so i was just thinking about taking my WR 426 out for a ride around the house...But i have about 3-3.5 feet of snow on the ground right now. So i was wondering what you guys thought about studding the tires? or do you even think the bike will make it through that much snow? i have decent tires on it right now, and i'm wondering if i stud the tires with sheet metal screws if it will shorten the life of the tire in the summer after i remove the screws?

any suggestions would be great!


Hey JS

Sheet metal screws will shorten the life of the tire a bit if you plan to use it for summer riding. The knobs tend to start to tear at the holes, and small rocks get stuck in the holes and help to break up the knobs.

You can easily ride on snow without studs. The studs only come into play on very hardpacked snow and ice. The #1 thing most folks think of for snow riding is rear tire traction, but the biggest problem you face is doing an endo when the front tire digs into soft snow, and I have done plenty. That's why I put the ski on the front of my bike. I installed the ski and rode thousands of snow miles without a problem. I bougt a new bike, went for a ride before installing the ski and was quickly reminded just how important it is.

I'm not saying you should run out and get a ski, just be aware that it can be a real problem, and very unpredictable. A trail can be fine for miles and then have a 20 foot soft spot that'll tip you over.

Snow up here can also be directional (I'm not sure about down south). i think it's got to do with how the wind is blowing when the snow falls. I call it "one way snow" I can ride up hills and barely leave a tire track, and then turn around and come back down, sinking up to the axles. When I flipped my bike on Saturday, it was on my return trip back to town, 20 minutes after I had just run the trail in the opposite direction with no problems.

  • jpryce

Posted March 14, 2008 - 05:38 AM

#5

I run a second set of tires in the winter studded with about 1500 1/2" ice screws. On ice or anything hard packed, it's an animal - way more grip than on dirt. But in 3 feet of loose snow, you're gonna get buried.

  • the ben

Posted March 24, 2008 - 10:35 AM

#6

yeah.. snow.. track and ski on my 08 450 .. check it out at 2moto.com




 
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