Gasses other than Nitrogen in tires?


15 replies to this topic
  • Frostbite

Posted March 08, 2008 - 06:55 AM

#1

Back in my roadracing days we used nitrogen in the tires to help keep the pressure more constant going from cold to hot, so I was wondering if other gasses would also work in the tires.

My studded tires add a lot of unsprung weight and anything to lighten them up would help, so I decided to try helium. MAN, does it WORK! Maybe a little too well.

  • William1

Posted March 08, 2008 - 08:49 AM

#2

I guess you plan to spend the day bending each stud slightly to 'catch' the ice and get it to stay down!

  • dirtysouth

Posted March 08, 2008 - 08:55 AM

#3

Inert gases do not take part in combustion processes, they generally do not react with other materials. An inert gas supplied to a limited space will reduce the amount of oxygen and even limit a combustion process such as a fire. So in theory you could try these:

Argon, Carbon Dioxide, Helium :thumbsup: , Neon, Nitrogen :eek: , and Xenon

[COLOR="Red"]Flammable gases[/COLOR] together with air or oxygen in the right concentration (pressure variations) will burn and/or explode:eek: if ignited. Should probably stay away from these:

:D ...Acetylene, Ammonia, Arsine, Butane, Carbon Monoxide, Cyclopropane, Ethane, Ethylene, Ethyl Chloride, Hydrogen, Isobutan, Methane, Methyl Chloride, Propane, Propylene, Silane...:ride:

I personally like the helium idea:applause:

  • Frostbite

Posted March 08, 2008 - 09:20 AM

#4

I guess you plan to spend the day bending each stud slightly to 'catch' the ice and get it to stay down!


Haha, good one William. :thumbsup:

I was weighing the bike to see the final tally with all fluids and spiked tires. I balanced the side stand on the scale and when I stepped back it looked like it was floating.

Ready to ride (no fuel) she tips in at 280 pounds.




Inert gases do not take part in combustion processes, they generally do not react with other materials. An inert gas supplied to a limited space will reduce the amount of oxygen and even limit a combustion process such as a fire. So in theory you could try these:

Argon, Carbon Dioxide, Helium :eek: , Neon, Nitrogen :D , and Xenon

[COLOR="Red"]Flammable gases[/COLOR] together with air or oxygen in the right concentration (pressure variations) will burn and/or explode:eek: if ignited. Should probably stay away from these:

:lol: ...Acetylene, Ammonia, Arsine, Butane, Carbon Monoxide, Cyclopropane, Ethane, Ethylene, Ethyl Chloride, Hydrogen, Isobutan, Methane, Methyl Chloride, Propane, Propylene, Silane...:ride:

I personally like the helium idea:applause:


Check out the big brain on DS! :ride:

Hey, you didn't mention Krypton. I spec'd that as the gas to be used in between the glass of the thermopane windows at the hospital. It's very dense so it doesn't convect as much as air, or Argon, which is typically used. This translates into less heat loss These Krypton windows are a first for Nunavut. They have a center of glass R value of R 12, as good as a 2 X 4 wall insulated with fiberglassbatt.

  • dirtysouth

Posted March 08, 2008 - 09:34 AM

#5

Hey, you didn't mention Krypton. I spec'd that as the gas to be used in between the glass of the thermopane windows at the hospital. It's very dense so it doesn't convect as much as air, or Argon, which is typically used. This translates into less heat loss These Krypton windows are a first for Nunavut. They have a center of glass R value of R 12, as good as a 2 X 4 wall insulated with fiberglassbatt.



Your not contemplating a Krypton loot from the hospital windows are you?:thumbsup:

  • Demo_Slug

Posted March 08, 2008 - 10:15 AM

#6

helium is probably going to leak.

  • strych9

Posted March 08, 2008 - 11:28 AM

#7

hahaha , funny stuff man. you should try jumping fire pits with hydrogen filled tires.

  • Frostbite

Posted March 08, 2008 - 03:06 PM

#8

Helium filled tires are far too bouyant, I'm switching back to fresh air.

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  • William1

Posted March 08, 2008 - 04:04 PM

#9

...... [URL="http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v89/frostbight/Phoenix%20Adventure/WR%20450%202008/Heliumtiresupsidedown.jpg"]far too bouyant[/URL......



That's what happens, seen it time and time again.

Kids today, you'd think they'd learn. We tell them, teach them, even plead with them, but no, they have to go out and mess with noble gases. There ought to be a law!

  • Frostbite

Posted March 08, 2008 - 04:07 PM

#10

[quote name='William1']That's what happens, seen it time and time again. [QUOTE]

That is freakin' hilarious, I'm laughing out loud!!! :thumbsup: :eek::lol: :D:lol: :ride::lol: :lol:

  • maxtherat

Posted March 08, 2008 - 05:39 PM

#11

Use an air dryer on your compressor and that is about as good as you'll get short of nitrogen. I guess another idea would be air from a scuba tank. Probably not readily avaliable there though.

  • rexbond007

Posted March 08, 2008 - 10:35 PM

#12

there's one gas you forgot. and may want to try

Nitrous Oxide..... it can make you go real fast....

seriously i use nitrogen and the tire pressure stays consitant.

  • justbackitin

Posted March 10, 2008 - 10:47 AM

#13

you could try filling you tires with cement:p
guaranteed to never get another flat, and could help drive your studs into the ice for extra traction. just go down 1 tooth in the front.:thumbsup:

  • William1

Posted March 10, 2008 - 01:24 PM

#14

Oooooooooow cement, brilliant idea. Max traction, terrific flywheel effect. You could probably get on the seat and do a jig with that inertia. Once going, be hard as hell to stall. Those pesky logs could be plowed right though. We wil need to start another thread though of the best cement mix types.

  • chrama1

Posted March 10, 2008 - 01:27 PM

#15

Here is the only way I could keep my bike on the ground after using helium in the tires...
http://farm2.static...._5785dfea51.jpg

  • Rayvan

Posted March 10, 2008 - 01:37 PM

#16

Helium filled tires are far too bouyant, I'm switching back to fresh air.



Summer air, or Winter air?
Summer air should split the difference between helium and Winter air. :eek: so your bike will have less tendency to flip over like that...
I've saved some [Summer air] from last year. Let me know, I'll give you a good deal! :thumbsup:




 
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