Shim Stack? '05wr is too stiff


4 replies to this topic
  • dugabrams

Posted January 28, 2008 - 06:35 PM

#1

What exactly is a shim stack?

Long story short. Previous owner of my '05wr450 sent the bike to a supension shop to be adjusted to his weight (225) and off road riding style. They added heavier springs and gold valves. Then he decided to try MX racing and sent it back to the supension shop and they did something to the shim stack to stiffen it up. He then sold it to me and bought a YZF.

I have had the bike for about six months and ride it all the time. I weigh about 205 and ride a lot of single track and dual sport it as well (did I mention it's plated). I believe it to be very stiff for what I use it for. Some of the symptoms are; front end washes out from braking or cliping rocks then quickly replants (kinda scary), when hillclimbing up rocky, shelflike banks, it doesn't absorb the bumps but bounces off and sends the bike into a harsh redirection or a wheelie.

I have played with the clickers and improved it but I think I need to undo the shim stack adjustment at a minimum. I looked in my owners manual and don't see anything called a shim stack. Another post I read said the WR's don't have shim stacks. Were these added to make the forks YZ like?

I'm a decent mechanic and on a limited budget. Is this something I can do myself?

  • SXP

Posted January 28, 2008 - 06:49 PM

#2

What exactly is a shim stack?

Long story short. Previous owner of my '05wr450 sent the bike to a supension shop to be adjusted to his weight (225) and off road riding style. They added heavier springs and gold valves. Then he decided to try MX racing and sent it back to the supension shop and they did something to the shim stack to stiffen it up. He then sold it to me and bought a YZF.

I have had the bike for about six months and ride it all the time. I weigh about 205 and ride a lot of single track and dual sport it as well (did I mention it's plated). I believe it to be very stiff for what I use it for. Some of the symptoms are; front end washes out from braking or cliping rocks then quickly replants (kinda scary), when hillclimbing up rocky, shelflike banks, it doesn't absorb the bumps but bounces off and sends the bike into a harsh redirection or a wheelie.

I have played with the clickers and improved it but I think I need to undo the shim stack adjustment at a minimum. I looked in my owners manual and don't see anything called a shim stack. Another post I read said the WR's don't have shim stacks. Were these added to make the forks YZ like?

I'm a decent mechanic and on a limited budget. Is this something I can do myself?


This is best left to a qualified suspension guy. The shim stack is a series of very thin washers of different thicknesses and diameters that are stacked one on top of the other and are placed above and below the fork/shock valve. The configuration of theses stacks determines how the oil flows in and out of the valve and ultimately effects how the fork/shock works. It's definitely an art best left to a person who understands how to combine these shims. If you knew what the stock stack is then it's easy enough to assemble the proper stack and retrofit the fork/shock. But if you are going to try and guess, it's going to be a time consuming trial and error process.

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  • dirtysouth

Posted January 28, 2008 - 06:51 PM

#3

What exactly is a shim stack?

Long story short. Previous owner of my '05wr450 sent the bike to a supension shop to be adjusted to his weight (225) and off road riding style. They added heavier springs and gold valves. Then he decided to try MX racing and sent it back to the supension shop and they did something to the shim stack to stiffen it up. He then sold it to me and bought a YZF.

I have had the bike for about six months and ride it all the time. I weigh about 205 and ride a lot of single track and dual sport it as well (did I mention it's plated). I believe it to be very stiff for what I use it for. Some of the symptoms are; front end washes out from braking or cliping rocks then quickly replants (kinda scary), when hillclimbing up rocky, shelflike banks, it doesn't absorb the bumps but bounces off and sends the bike into a harsh redirection or a wheelie.

I have played with the clickers and improved it but I think I need to undo the shim stack adjustment at a minimum. I looked in my owners manual and don't see anything called a shim stack. Another post I read said the WR's don't have shim stacks. Were these added to make the forks YZ like?

I'm a decent mechanic and on a limited budget. Is this something I can do myself?


I consider myself to be a decent mechanic too but let someone do your forks man and if you are lucky they'll let you watch and see why you're happy to go this route. Don't let me discourage you from doing it yourself. I mean if you want to try it go ahead but being on a limited budget and all probably won't let you get a new set if you fold these up in the process. And I can only really say that the the shims stacks are something of an art from what I have observed at the shop. Maybe you will get some info here that will build your confidence but there are some tricky specifics that will get your forks dialed in to you.

  • dugabrams

Posted January 28, 2008 - 07:45 PM

#4

Thanks for the quick replies. You have convinced me to take it back to that shop.
Does anybody know for sure that '05 WR's have shim stacks?

  • SXP

Posted January 28, 2008 - 07:48 PM

#5

Thanks for the quick replies. You have convinced me to take it back to that shop.
Does anybody know for sure that '05 WR's have shim stacks?


All modern bikes have shim stacks in their forks and shocks.




 
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