YZ/F -> WR rear wheel swap Qs for paddle tire plus sprocket/axle location Q


6 replies to this topic
  • NW_E-rider

Posted January 19, 2008 - 01:00 PM

#1

After extensively searching TT forums, I am not quite 100% confident so I will post to gather some expertise here:

1. Will a YZF250/400/426/450 rear wheel, bearing set, brake rotor, and sprocket directly install on a '03 WR450? Are all years of these models the same in this area? Would like to swap over axle and re-use all axle block parts to swap back and forth.

2. Will a YZ125/250 (2 stroke) directly install? Read something about the wheels being narrower? What about bearings, brake rotor, and sprocket setup compared to '03 WR450? Again, any year ranges to consider, or do all work (knowing 70's & 80's vintage stuff likely won't w/ rear drum)?

3. Has anyone experimented with axle position as a function of rear sprocket size, keeping the chain length the same? Basically I want to go to a smaller rear sprocket to move my axle back (3-4 notches?) for plenty of paddle clearance without having to add any links to the chain. I am currently running a 110/100-18 and run my axle on the 4th notch (1/3 way back in axle range) w/ stock 14/50 gearing. I read that 2nd gear starts are suggested on the dunes, so wouldn't mind gearing up anyway.

Thanks everyone, really appreciate the technical expertise of this forum. I am a newbie of sorts to WR forum, surfed the DRZ forum for 6 years until I blew up my '00 DRZ400E last spring in the Oregon desert...perfect opp to upgrade to a gently used '03 WR450! Man, what a difference! DRZ was great on nasty, rocky, rutted NW trails, yet WR is nearly as good and absolutely blows the DRZ away on everything else!

RMJ

  • NW_E-rider

Posted January 21, 2008 - 11:27 AM

#2

Not a single reply? Was Sat timing bad, Monday morning better (everyone looks busy at their desk while they are really surfing TT and various moto sites)?

Just need a few quick q's answered from all you Yamaha WR/YZF experts.

Thanks,
RMJ

  • IrideWR

Posted January 21, 2008 - 12:17 PM

#3

I don't know about the wheel changes but I run the same size tire on my 07 450 with the stoke chain and I put a paddle on no problem It did eat my dirt guard though.Posted Image It was from the sand blasting it.

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  • Thumper_Bloke

Posted January 21, 2008 - 02:55 PM

#4

Me too, same question exactly! I want to sell my Raptor and use the WR at Glamis.

  • Wiz636

Posted January 21, 2008 - 04:05 PM

#5

Pretty sure that YZ250/YZ450F/WR450F wheels are interchangeable from '99 on up. Obviously the YZs have the 19" rim but that doesn't matter beyond having to get the right size tire. I have heard that in some cases it is necessary to have the wheel spacers from whatever bike the wheel is coming from but in the swaps I have done it has not been necessary. I have an 18" rear wheel from an '02 WR426 that I have used on both my YZ426 and YZ250.

125s and 250Fs have a narrower rear rim, don't know if the hub is the same though..

  • bigdrtrdr

Posted January 21, 2008 - 04:47 PM

#6

The wheels will swap around, Watch the brake rotor sizes if included.
As far as the chain goes, Buy a cheap chain and shove the axle back as far as possible. You can ruin your airbox and possibly pull it off the motor running a paddle tire to close the the mud flap.

  • dirtysouth

Posted January 22, 2008 - 09:52 PM

#7

After extensively searching TT forums, I am not quite 100% confident so I will post to gather some expertise here:

1. Will a YZF250/400/426/450 rear wheel, bearing set, brake rotor, and sprocket directly install on a '03 WR450? Are all years of these models the same in this area? Would like to swap over axle and re-use all axle block parts to swap back and forth.

2. Will a YZ125/250 (2 stroke) directly install? Read something about the wheels being narrower? What about bearings, brake rotor, and sprocket setup compared to '03 WR450? Again, any year ranges to consider, or do all work (knowing 70's & 80's vintage stuff likely won't w/ rear drum)?

3. Has anyone experimented with axle position as a function of rear sprocket size, keeping the chain length the same? Basically I want to go to a smaller rear sprocket to move my axle back (3-4 notches?) for plenty of paddle clearance without having to add any links to the chain. I am currently running a 110/100-18 and run my axle on the 4th notch (1/3 way back in axle range) w/ stock 14/50 gearing. I read that 2nd gear starts are suggested on the dunes, so wouldn't mind gearing up anyway.

Thanks everyone, really appreciate the technical expertise of this forum. I am a newbie of sorts to WR forum, surfed the DRZ forum for 6 years until I blew up my '00 DRZ400E last spring in the Oregon desert...perfect opp to upgrade to a gently used '03 WR450! Man, what a difference! DRZ was great on nasty, rocky, rutted NW trails, yet WR is nearly as good and absolutely blows the DRZ away on everything else!

RMJ


Check this link http://www.yamaha-mo...parts/home.aspx Put in your bike model and the one that your thinking of using and look at the rear wheel exploded view. First part on that list will be the OEM hub part number which is the same on all rears that I checked 2000 on. Fronts are different since WRs have the odo. As far as sprockets go I found a 45 JT sprocket a good while back and didn't like it sliding my axle back (Wheelie Junkie) so I only ran it for about 5 minutes. If you want it I can let it go for 45 shipped as long as you are in the contiguous U.S. Will have to slide your axle all the way back or thereabouts. Will change your gears from 3.57 to 3.21




 
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