OHH $hit Oil Chage...


54 replies to this topic
  • El Bandito De BadAss

Posted January 13, 2008 - 10:42 PM

#21

if you need a parts blowup similar to servicehonda.com ....... here's one for the zukies http://216.37.204.20...em/SuzukiDB.asp

  • Me and my monkee

Posted January 14, 2008 - 01:18 PM

#22

There was a screw in your oil, and you just added fresh oil and thought ... ok.

And now "how does the neutral switch attach?" Well, insert the screws into the holes, one of which is clearly visible in the photo.


Well geez. Now I know everything. Thanks Captain Helpful.
I found the screw in the drain pan after working on several other things on the bike while the oil was draining. In 18 years of changing oil in bikes and cars, I have NEVER had a screw come out of the sump. I have however, found random loose fasteners in crevices of engines. Thats why I was not too concerned.
As to the picture, I kinda figured that the screw might happen to fit into the screw hole. But that did not explain the spring and the 'contact'. While I'm sure I could figure it out, I would rather go into the job with complete knowledge rather than just assumptions. You know what "assume" does, right? Of course you do. You have obviously done much ASSuming in your time.
Thanks to the helpful tips from the other posters. I believe I'm looking at parts 32-35 in this pic, right?
Posted Image
Hopefully only one screw is out, but if its all in the bottom of the engine, which hole (In the engine) do I insert the spring and contact into. I think it should be the outer one, right?
thanks

  • mxrob

Posted February 03, 2008 - 05:15 AM

#23

I read this thread and decided to check the NSU screws on my new purchase, a 2003 DR650SE with 5,500 miles. If it means anything this bike does have the little metal tab on the cylinder base gasket that some people say wasn't a feature until 2004 model years.

For ones as inexperienced as me ,the process was not a slame dunk and this writeup may help you. Real mechanics can skip this, or giggle and make rude comments , or maybe give some helpful insight .....

> do it at an oil change, gotta drain it first

> I took off the brake off pedal first, requires two different sizes of cotter pins if you do.

> I suggest removing the clutch cable from the clutch lever AND removing the clutch cable holder from the starter motor to make removal easier from the engine actuating arm.

> notice where the engine clutch actuating arm is pointing BEFORE you disassemble the cover. The lever will go back together in a slightly too far forward position, leaving not enough slack in the cable. I didn't think ahead, put it back wrong, so I got to do the WHOLE process twice, and I didn't like doing it that much the first time.

> my cover loosened easily with a rubber mallet, but seemed to not want to let go. The trick seems to be to rotate the engine clutch actuating lever to push the cover off from the inside.

> Inside the case one screw on the Neutral Sending Unit is easy to access, but the other is pretty far up under the clutch basket - a straight screw driver will barely, if at all, engage the head. I have one of those common Sears Craftsman bent right angle screw drivers I hoped to use, but it was too tall to fit on to the upper screw. Anybody have suggestions on a tool to get at the hidden screw without removing the full clutch and basket?

> screws were tight on my bike, happy day, hope they are tight on yours!

> Reassembling I noticed three different sizes of the cap screws holding on the outside cover, I really didn't pay attention taking them out - in the proper holes they take about 10-11 rotations to seat. Noted one screw right near the oil banjo had a gasket, and the oil banjo bolt has a metal washer on the top and the bottom. 8mm's on the oil radiator end were on gorilla tight on my bike, amazed they were not stripped. I wouldn't start this without an 8mm quarter inch drive socket including a 4" inch long extension.

> After all it looks to me like a loose screw would settle pretty safely into the cavity right over the drain plug, so a magnetic plug sounds good. Seems it might take some radical endo at the wrong moment to actually throw a loose screw uphill against gravity into some moving parts. Has anyone actually documented any BAD damage from from this happening?

> Yesterday I did the DynoJet install, header weld grind, and front sprocket swap, and those tasks were very simple to me by compare - this whole process seemed like a pretty big PITA just to have some peace of mind. I would probably just wait till I found a screw in my oil change, or my neutral light started fritzing before doing it again.

Jim R
Reno/Sparks Nevada


Good write up! One point though on the screw just gently falling out and settling on the bottom. The hurricane turbulence of the clutch basket and gears in the oil can easily sweep the screw up into places that would be a major bummer for it/them to be. :busted:

  • Me and my monkee

Posted February 03, 2008 - 05:33 AM

#24

Update.
I replaced my screw. It was the lower one. The upper seemed tight so I didnt mess with it.
The write up above is good. I noticed the different length engine screws and marked the cover with a dry erase pen as I removed them. I did not need to remove the brake pedal as I unbolted the brake cylinder from the frame which allowed the pedal to moved down far enough to remove the engine case.

  • CaptTurbo

Posted February 03, 2008 - 05:36 AM

#25

Thanks for the pointers Jim. I was kicking the idea of checking mine even though my bike only has a bit over 1600 miles now. I do have the magnetic oil drain plug so I will skip it for now. It's good to have your writeup to fall back on should the day come that I need to check on things.

  • berni

Posted February 03, 2008 - 06:11 AM

#26

Update.
I replaced my screw. It was the lower one. The upper seemed tight so I didnt mess with it.
The write up above is good. I noticed the different length engine screws and marked the cover with a dry erase pen as I removed them. I did not need to remove the brake pedal as I unbolted the brake cylinder from the frame which allowed the pedal to moved down far enough to remove the engine case.


Re: different length engines screws. Take a square piece of carboard, outline an approximation of the engine cover and screw location. Prick a hole in the cardboard at each screw location. As you remove each screw, push or thread it into the appropriate hole in the cardboard outline. Screw holder.

  • swanni06

Posted February 20, 2008 - 05:41 PM

#27

Did they fix this problem on the 08 models??? I am really really considering getting a brand new one soon and really don`t want that to happen on my bike.I guess I will buy the extended warranty too.At what millage does the screws usually come out?

  • mxrob

Posted February 21, 2008 - 03:50 AM

#28

Did they fix this problem on the 08 models??? I am really really considering getting a brand new one soon and really don`t want that to happen on my bike.I guess I will buy the extended warranty too.At what millage does the screws usually come out?


This issue, although documented, is more rare than the norm. :applause:

  • JamminJay

Posted May 06, 2008 - 06:31 AM

#29

So, I took a look inside to check on the NSU bolts. The bolts were in place and looked to be tight. As we know, the bottom bolt is easy to access, so I removed that one (was on there fairly snug) and loctited it.

But what to do about the upper bolt? How do you access that without having to remove the whole clutch basket assembly? It looks like it's snug. What do you guys suggest? Just leave it? :eek:
I don't think I'm that mechanically inclined to remove the whole clutch assembly and put it back together, plus, there's a nice dual-sport ride this weekend :p and I dont want to mess anything up.

Posted Image

  • Mister Twister

Posted May 06, 2008 - 07:26 AM

#30

If I go through the trouble of taking mine apart the bolts will be replaced with socket head cap screws or hex heads with holes drilled through the heads stainless steel safety wire connecting them and wrapped real neat. Problem solved they will never back out unless you want them to even if they loosen up. If it is good enough for aircraft usage it is plenty good enough for the vibration and stress a DR 650 can muster up. :eek:

Visit the ThumperTalk Store for the lowest prices on motorcycle / ATV parts and accessories - Guaranteed
  • chomleyhaines

Posted May 29, 2008 - 12:57 PM

#31

great ! thanks just the info i was looking for!

i also have found the items in the oil after oil change and the motor sounds really rattly so i hope its just the sensor being smashed about ..

  • bigboy292000

Posted May 29, 2008 - 02:12 PM

#32

great ! thanks just the info i was looking for!

i also have found the items in the oil after oil change and the motor sounds really rattly so i hope its just the sensor being smashed about ..


What year is your bike, how many miles?

  • chomleyhaines

Posted May 30, 2008 - 11:04 AM

#33

1996 dual sport version !

  • MtnJohn

Posted August 08, 2009 - 04:24 PM

#34

Is anyone reinstalling the switch with a lock washer as well as locktite or locktite only?

  • bergman501

Posted August 09, 2009 - 07:50 AM

#35

anybody know of the latest year DR this has happened too? any 07, 08,09's ? you would think suzuki would have at least put lock washers on the screws. a would think lock washers and blue oil compatible locktite would be fine.

  • Dirty Harry

Posted August 09, 2009 - 02:32 PM

#36

If I go through the trouble of taking mine apart the bolts will be replaced with socket head cap screws or hex heads with holes drilled through the heads stainless steel safety wire connecting them and wrapped real neat. Problem solved they will never back out unless you want them to even if they loosen up. If it is good enough for aircraft usage it is plenty good enough for the vibration and stress a DR 650 can muster up. :thumbsup:


Its true, this would completely eliminate the chance of anything backing out. The US probably use a mile of safety wire throughout the engine and airframe of a fighter jet.

  • gtsrig

Posted August 09, 2009 - 03:10 PM

#37

Is anyone reinstalling the switch with a lock washer as well as locktite or locktite only?


I just got through redoing mine with longer hex bolts with internal locking washers and locktite. The factory screws were just barely more than finger tight. 08 with 4500 miles
Posted Image

Posted Image

Removed the oil lines.
Posted Image

Posted Image

Removed the brake lever.
Posted Image

Handy dandy small flat ratcheting wrench that holds phillips bit
Posted Image

Layed out the case bolts in the order of their reinstallment.
Posted Image

Took some work to install the back bolt without taking off the clutch basket. If I had to do it again I probably would take out the clutch 1st.
Posted Image

Make sure you put the O-ring back in place on the lower oil line.
Posted Image

  • psmcn

Posted December 02, 2009 - 02:56 PM

#38

If I go through the trouble of taking mine apart the bolts will be replaced with socket head cap screws or hex heads with holes drilled through the heads stainless steel safety wire connecting them and wrapped real neat. Problem solved they will never back out unless you want them to even if they loosen up. If it is good enough for aircraft usage it is plenty good enough for the vibration and stress a DR 650 can muster up. :banghead:


This is the best solution and will be mine. Thanks

  • djmell762

Posted December 15, 2009 - 09:40 PM

#39

Just drained the oil on my 97 with 13k miles on it. The NSU pin came out :moon:. So I'm gonna pull the side cover when a new gasket comes in. My little instrument pod with the green neutral light is sitting in a box unused any way. Does anybody know if I can just go ahead and remove the unit altogether?

  • LukasM

Posted December 16, 2009 - 12:10 AM

#40

Just drained the oil on my 97 with 13k miles on it. The NSU pin came out :moon:. So I'm gonna pull the side cover when a new gasket comes in. My little instrument pod with the green neutral light is sitting in a box unused any way. Does anybody know if I can just go ahead and remove the unit altogether?


You should consider yourself lucky that it just dropped out and didn't do any serious damage.

The unit can be removed completely, but you will need to either cut off the wiring inside the case or seal the hole up in some other manner.




 
x

Join Our Community!

Even if you don't want to post, registered members get access to tools that make finding & following the good stuff easier.

If you enjoyed reading about "" here in the ThumperTalk archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join ThumperTalk today!

The views and opinions expressed on this page are strictly those of the author, and have not been reviewed or approved by ThumperTalk.