Tusk Oil Filters


41 replies to this topic
  • 642MX

Posted January 12, 2008 - 05:17 PM

#21

I have, several times.


Okay, so now I have....:banghead:

What caused it?

  • grayracer513

Posted January 12, 2008 - 05:28 PM

#22

Different things. In the "old days", you'd see it with paper filters when water got into the oil. The water would both clog and then wet the filter, and it would fold up.

You'll see the same thing in cases where there is a lot of debris dumped on the filter, like from a fried clutch, or a bearing coming apart, but if the filter is sturdy enough, it should bypass instead of collapsing. Of course, there's no filtration when it bypasses, either.

  • zdylanh

Posted January 13, 2008 - 08:47 PM

#23

I don't know what you guys are doing to your bikes, but I rarely see anything on my oil filter when I change it. How long are you going before you change the filters? I know I have seen some metal on the filter when the bike is new, but you should be changing the filter more often when the bike is new. I think if you are maintaining your bike correctly, you won't see much on the oil filter unless you dump your bike in river or something extreme and if that happens, I don't think it's the filter that you should be worrying about.

I really doubt that any filter is designed to hold up if it is to totally plugged, and if it is totally plugged for some reason, I will revert back to my comment above -- you most likely have other problems to worry about, not the filter.

I don't think it really matters that much which filter you use, as long as you use it correctly and change your oil often. As far as cost and quality goes, there are some differences. But the margin on OEM stuff is quite high. The 12 OEM filter most likely only costs a few bucks to make. The less expensive filter that sells for 6 bucks or so probably does not have nearly the mark up as the OEM filter has and probably costs a few bucks to make as well. The difference in cost is probably some quality and mostly just margin to the manufacturer.

I choose to keep the margin in my pocket since the less expensive filter works fine and I have never had any engine trouble to speak of, even after using these filters for over 1 year on the same bike. If you sleep better at night using a "higher quality" filter, more power to you -- we all have our own preferences.

  • creeker

Posted January 14, 2008 - 06:22 AM

#24

^ Well Said...:banghead:

  • Terrain Rider 4z

Posted January 14, 2008 - 07:16 AM

#25

I always have metal shavings on the filter of my 426. Everyone I know with a 426 (6 guys I ride with often) have metal shavings on their filter. Look closely down in the pleats, you might be surprised what you find. Now, if your filter isn't pleated I don't know where this stuff would be found at this point?

  • grayracer513

Posted January 14, 2008 - 07:43 AM

#26

I don't know what you guys are doing to your bikes, but I rarely see anything on my oil filter when I change it.

Part of that is that you are apparently using fiber mat (paper) filters, and these take on a dark, slightly "fuzzy" look when used, and that, and the amount of oil held on their surface makes the little stuff difficult to see. If you let the oil drain away from them for a while and take them out in the sun, you find all kinds of little stuff tucked into them. The mesh filters make it much easier to see. As to my oil change interval, it's every 3 rides at most. Sooner if there's a race in the interval, or if prepping for a long ride. The filter gets cleaned every oil change.

Typically, a new bike will shed quite a bit of material at first, and then it should enter a long, happy phase when it won't put much on the filter at all. Even then, we are dealing with oil from a manual trans and a clutch, so you're bound to find debris in your filter if you look.

As far as filters collapsing, most of them won't cave in to water anymore, so that's not really such a big issue. And, as you say, if you suddenly have a bunch of steel dumped on the filter, you probably have a bigger problem on your hands anyway, but wouldn't it be helpful if the filter could keep that stuff out of the top end for as long as possible? Might save you $1000 or so, who knows?

My position of the question is that I use a Scotts only partly because it saves me money. Mostly, I use them because I prefer the stainless mesh filters to the fiber mat ones (ideally, I would have two, a mesh filter first, followed by a paper one), and the Scotts is the best of that type by a significant margin.

  • creeker

Posted January 14, 2008 - 08:03 AM

#27

I always have metal shavings on the filter of my 426. Everyone I know with a 426 (6 guys I ride with often) have metal shavings on their filter. Look closely down in the pleats, you might be surprised what you find. Now, if your filter isn't pleated I don't know where this stuff would be found at this point?

I have owned both a 2000 YZ426 and a 2001 WR426 and never EVER had metal shaving on the filter after the initial break-in period.

  • King_Air

Posted January 14, 2008 - 08:23 AM

#28

I have owned both a 2000 YZ426 and a 2001 WR426 and never EVER had metal shaving on the filter after the initial break-in period.


That's only because you are not seeing it. Try what Gray sugggested with draining the oil from the filter and inspecting it in a good light source. I think that you will see what he trying to say.

  • mxchamps

Posted January 14, 2008 - 08:52 AM

#29

Part of that is that you are apparently using fiber mat (paper) filters, and these take on a dark, slightly "fuzzy" look when used, and that, and the amount of oil held on their surface makes the little stuff difficult to see. If you let the oil drain away from them for a while and take them out in the sun, you find all kinds of little stuff tucked into them. The mesh filters make it much easier to see. As to my oil change interval, it's every 3 rides at most. Sooner if there's a race in the interval, or if prepping for a long ride. The filter gets cleaned every oil change.

Typically, a new bike will shed quite a bit of material at first, and then it should enter a long, happy phase when it won't put much on the filter at all. Even then, we are dealing with oil from a manual trans and a clutch, so you're bound to find debris in your filter if you look.

As far as filters collapsing, most of them won't cave in to water anymore, so that's not really such a big issue. And, as you say, if you suddenly have a bunch of steel dumped on the filter, you probably have a bigger problem on your hands anyway, but wouldn't it be helpful if the filter could keep that stuff out of the top end for as long as possible? Might save you $1000 or so, who knows?

My position of the question is that I use a Scotts only partly because it saves me money. Mostly, I use them because I prefer the stainless mesh filters to the fiber mat ones (ideally, I would have two, a mesh filter first, followed by a paper one), and the Scotts is the best of that type by a significant margin.


Gray, come on down off your soap box and just stick to OEM filters if you want. I Race expert, put a ton of miles on my bikes and beat the hell out of them and have never had a problem with the cheap EMGO filters, K&N filters, or Tusk filters. Take the advise of ZDYLANH and change your filter more than once a year and you will be fine. Shoot, making sure nothing gets through your air filter is about a million times more important. Why don't you preach that subject for a while.:banghead:

  • grayracer513

Posted January 14, 2008 - 09:25 AM

#30

Gray, come on down off your soap box and just stick to OEM filters if you want.

Please quote anything I have said that indicates that I would use an OEM oil filter.

That's what I thought.

Take the advise of ZDYLANH and change your filter more than once a year and you will be fine.

You must have also missed this:

The filter gets cleaned every oil change.


Shoot, making sure nothing gets through your air filter is about a million times more important. Why don't you preach that subject for a while.:banghead:

In this case, simply because that's not the topic.

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  • mxchamps

Posted January 14, 2008 - 11:37 AM

#31

Gray racer! Over 14 thousand posts! Wow! too much time on your hands. All I'm saying is I have never had a problem with any oil filter. If you have you should stick with OEM or Scotts like you suggested. I don't have a problem with either. I have heard paper filters are the best. In that case just get OEM or EMGO and get out and ride.

  • grayracer513

Posted January 14, 2008 - 11:58 AM

#32

I have heard paper filters are the best.

We disagree:

http://www.thumperta...297#post4676297

  • BASSic

Posted January 14, 2008 - 12:48 PM

#33

The OEM YZ426 filter (at least the one I got from the Yamaha stealership) isn't paper mesh. It's pleated brass mesh.

When I did my recent oil change, I took the old filter off it had tiny bits of metal on it. In the box o' goodies the previous owner gave me there was a used oil filter in there and it too had a few tiny metal shavings stuck to it. In this thread I noticed on rider and several of his 426 buddies all claim they have this metal in their filter, then one person says there's no metal and never should be. I understand a bit of metal is normal, but where is it coming from?

  • grayracer513

Posted January 14, 2008 - 01:48 PM

#34

The brass mesh filter (1UY-13440-02-00) is OEM on all '02 and earlier models. It was replaced in '03 by the "paper" type (5TA-13440-00-00) that is now standard. They are interchangeable as far as fit and function, but the brass mesh does not filter well at all, and will only filter down to about 80 microns. They should not be used when there is an alternative available.

As to the source of the metal, probably 80 percent of the normal debris or more comes from the transmission gears, and from the edges of the clutch plates, basket and hub. "Some" (a very exact term, I know) is normal. "None" is just BS. :banghead:

  • mxchamps

Posted January 14, 2008 - 02:08 PM

#35

The OEM YZ426 filter (at least the one I got from the Yamaha stealership) isn't paper mesh. It's pleated brass mesh.

When I did my recent oil change, I took the old filter off it had tiny bits of metal on it. In the box o' goodies the previous owner gave me there was a used oil filter in there and it too had a few tiny metal shavings stuck to it. In this thread I noticed on rider and several of his 426 buddies all claim they have this metal in their filter, then one person says there's no metal and never should be. I understand a bit of metal is normal, but where is it coming from?


It is normal. It comes from all the gears slapping together most likely. Make sure you change the filter more than gray guy so it doesn't collapse. Cause that happens a lot I'm sure:bonk:

  • grayracer513

Posted January 14, 2008 - 03:11 PM

#36

It is normal. It comes from all the gears slapping together most likely. Make sure you change the filter more than gray guy so it doesn't collapse. Cause that happens a lot I'm sure:banghead:

How often do I service my oil filter? Provide the quote where I said oil filter collapse is a frequent occurrence.

  • todds924

Posted January 14, 2008 - 03:23 PM

#37

I've never seen or heard about an oil filter collapsing.....:banghead:


I have seen Kawasaki streetbike filters collapse...on there cruisers....Thats why they had a recall and redesigned the filter. It can happen. I have yet to see one on a modern 4 stroke dirtbike collapse but i'm sure it could happen....even more so with a 2.99 filter.

  • zdylanh

Posted January 14, 2008 - 06:51 PM

#38

Grayracer, I am so confused -- I don't even know what you are arguing any more. I think we are all wasting our time posting because anything we say is not valid and put down by your infinite knowledge. I hate to tell you this, but there are others in this thumpertalk world that have valid opinions and (as much as you don't want to admit it) FACTS.
This thread started as a discussion about oil filters. Several people have said they like the cheap filters and have not had any trouble with them. Some people say they don't. As far as I have seen, no one has actually had any trouble with the less expensive filters, they just say they don't "look" as high "quality".
I haven't had had any trouble with the less expensive filters in more than a year of use, no one can argue with that. My bike runs great and I run it hard. I would bet that anyone else that uses them would have similiar results. (with the exception of some freak situation that someone will bring up to prove me wrong) Yeah, there is some debris from the clutch etc in the filter after running the bike, but what is some? I suppose if you get out your microscope you will see some stuff. There is of course something, or else there wouldn't be a filter.
The important thing is that your filter works and your engine runs without any issues. My filter works great and has for quite some time and it doesn't cost me alot. Can you argue with that? Probably....

  • 642MX

Posted January 14, 2008 - 07:04 PM

#39

I think we are all wasting our time posting because anything we say is not valid and put down by your infinite knowledge.


I, for one, am thankful for Grayracers insight with this topic as well as other topics. We may all not agree, but I don't think anyone gets talked down to because of a difference in opinions.

There is a lot to be learned from everyone on this site. :banghead:

  • todds924

Posted January 14, 2008 - 09:08 PM

#40

The brass mesh filter (1UY-13440-02-00) is OEM on all '02 and earlier models. It was replaced in '03 by the "paper" type (5TA-13440-00-00) that is now standard. They are interchangeable as far as fit and function, but the brass mesh does not filter well at all, and will only filter down to about 80 microns. They should not be used when there is an alternative available.

As to the source of the metal, probably 80 percent of the normal debris or more comes from the transmission gears, and from the edges of the clutch plates, basket and hub. "Some" (a very exact term, I know) is normal. "None" is just BS. :banghead:


The 5ta-13440 has a new number now...I believe its 5D3-13440-00. I personally use the stock filters in my bikes........ but i pay 20 bucks for 20 filters......stock...OEM.





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