Check out these pictures? Advice XL600R Cylinder Head Removed? Rust or something?


30 replies to this topic
  • superior

Posted January 10, 2008 - 03:47 PM

#21

Here's another small thing that will make a big difference with top end oiling on the 600 motors, take the banjo bolts out, you will see that the one on the case has a larger hole in it.
Drill the center an the side port(jet) out to 1/8 in. Do the same to the one on the cylinder head as well. Also index the side port(jet) with a washer if necessary so the port lines up with the oil feed line hole.
This will help get oil to the head faster, it's not the cure all but I have had good results with just this mod an a lighter first number oil.


Thanks for the advice. I have already ordered a new oil pump and oil lines. I am now looking for a cam & rocker replacement. I'm not sure but hopefully I can find one that is in good condition that is used (I'm trying to spare the $$), but if not I'll have to fork out for new ones. Any idea on where I can find these in good condition used?

  • Nailpounder

Posted January 10, 2008 - 03:56 PM

#22

Web cam can hardweld your bad rockers an cam.
check them out at http://www.webcamshafts.com/
Or give them a call.
post some good pics of them so we can look at there condition first.
They may be alright. I dunno until I see them.

  • cleonard

Posted January 10, 2008 - 04:07 PM

#23

Not wanting to go off topic or derail the thread, but why the automatic "replace the oil pump?"

The manual specs the wear limits for the oil pump. If it is within specs why replace it? It is a rather simple thing. If the rotors are in good shape why toss it. On my last rebuild I did do a little mix and match between the three oil pumps that I have to get the best parts.

It really shows if your pump has tried to pump metal. I have seen some torn up rotors and housings. If torn up then I agree replace.

  • Nailpounder

Posted January 10, 2008 - 04:22 PM

#24

Not wanting to go off topic or derail the thread, but why the automatic "replace the oil pump?"

The manual specs the wear limits for the oil pump. If it is within specs why replace it? It is a rather simple thing. If the rotors are in good shape why toss it. On my last rebuild I did do a little mix and match between the three oil pumps that I have to get the best parts.

It really shows if your pump has tried to pump metal. I have seen some torn up rotors and housings. If torn up than I agree replace.



X2 on that info.

  • Horri

Posted January 10, 2008 - 04:40 PM

#25

Make sure that bearing near cam sprocket is a sealed bearing, because the oil needs to go thru the cam to oil the lobes and rockers.
if the head cover gasket surface are smooth and clean you dont need to
add silicone.


In reality the bearings at either end of the cam should only be sealed on the outer face of each one.The plastic or rubber type seal on the inner face of each bearing should be removed.
The guy who does a bit of work on my bikes told me that and hes being working on these engines for donkeys years.

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  • pwrpapa

Posted January 10, 2008 - 05:46 PM

#26

Here's another small thing that will make a big difference with top end oiling on the 600 motors, take the banjo bolts out, you will see that the one on the case has a larger hole in it.
Drill the center an the side port(jet) out to 1/8 in. Do the same to the one on the cylinder head as well. Also index the side port(jet) with a washer if necessary so the port lines up with the oil feed line hole.
This will help get oil to the head faster, it's not the cure all but I have had good results with just this mod an a lighter first number oil.


Great info Nailpounder.
I'm gonna give it a try on my 600. I never thought about indexing the banjo oil holes.

  • crmc33

Posted January 11, 2008 - 04:43 AM

#27

Bear in mind that drilling the holes bigger in the oil line banjo will mean more flow to the top end (cam) of the engine will mean less to the crank big end.

If the engines built right, you dont need to do it.

Im my experience, its the seal in the clutch cover (fits over the crank to maintain oil pressure) and the oil pump condn thats key (obviously as well as having regular clean oil). If the crank seal blows or is misplaced, the first thing to suffer is the cam of course.

Interesting to note that the older XBR/XR and XL models have a more defined cam troughs set into the heads. I think this helps oiling on start up too.

  • creeky

Posted January 11, 2008 - 06:53 AM

#28

About sealants....don't use sealant on the head gasket, install it dry, make sure that the gasket surfaces of the head and cylinder are clean, free of grease/oil, smooth with no burrs or gouges. Same for base gasket, no sealant, dry, clean surfaces, no gouges. You can use sealant on the cam cover if you want, but use it very sparingly, a very thin coat is enough. My comments are based on 24 years of riding, crashing, and repairing XRs.

  • pwrpapa

Posted January 11, 2008 - 08:00 AM

#29

Bear in mind that drilling the holes bigger in the oil line banjo will mean more flow to the top end (cam) of the engine will mean less to the crank big end.

If the engines built right, you dont need to do it.

Im my experience, its the seal in the clutch cover (fits over the crank to maintain oil pressure) and the oil pump condn thats key (obviously as well as having regular clean oil). If the crank seal blows or is misplaced, the first thing to suffer is the cam of course.

Interesting to note that the older XBR/XR and XL models have a more defined cam troughs set into the heads. I think this helps oiling on start up too.


I've done all that.
All new seals an pump, complete rebuild an the cam an rockers still take a dump on me. I'm gonna do the banjo bolt first an then a bigger feed line if that don't cure it. That itty bitty feed line will only allow so much oil to the head, by making the banjo bolt holes the same size shouldn't kill the crank I hope. I'll let ya know when I'm done with it.

  • martinfan30

Posted January 11, 2008 - 09:07 AM

#30

Bear in mind that drilling the holes bigger in the oil line banjo will mean more flow to the top end (cam) of the engine will mean less to the crank big end.

If the engines built right, you dont need to do it.

Im my experience, its the seal in the clutch cover (fits over the crank to maintain oil pressure) and the oil pump condn thats key (obviously as well as having regular clean oil). If the crank seal blows or is misplaced, the first thing to suffer is the cam of course.

Interesting to note that the older XBR/XR and XL models have a more defined cam troughs set into the heads. I think this helps oiling on start up too.



This was my concern when Nailpounder brought this whole thing up.

I do think i will try the banjo bolt mod, with indexing. Although the last time i had my valve cover off, every thing was looking perfectly new.

LOF every 1k miles.

  • pwrpapa

Posted January 11, 2008 - 09:11 AM

#31

I talked with XR's only an the banjo bolt was one of their mods that they recommend. They said that won't hurt the oil supply to the crank an it will help the cam an rockers live longer. At this point and time a new rod is cheaper than the cam an rockers are.





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