08 YZ450 Countershaft seal leaking


22 replies to this topic
  • 08YZ450Rider

Posted December 27, 2007 - 05:57 AM

#1

OK, I made a goon mistake. I think I got the pressure washer too close to my seal, but it confuses me because there is a metal cover on the seal and it is very tight against the case. It started leaking and was simply dripping so I could add oil as I rode at the MX track. I got a new seal and put it in but now it leaks like a sieve. I could not get the metal collar off so I simply put the seal on over the collar. The seal is not exactly flush with the case. could this be the problem? Does the sprocket need to be on and tightened to help with the seal of the collar o-ring. I am so bummed because I have this brand new bike and am afraid to ride it now because all the oil will leak out before I get 10 laps in. Any help would be greatly appreciated. By the way, i do not use a pressure washer anymore.

  • grayracer513

Posted December 27, 2007 - 08:22 AM

#2

To remove the collar, with the sprocket removed, insert a punch into the center drill hole of the output shaft and give it a couple of moderately light taps with a hammer. This should push the shaft back in the bearing a little, breaking the adhesion between the collar and the O-ring under it. Then, put the trans in gear and grip the end of the collar with a pair of pliers. Rotate it as you pull, and it should come right off.

Replace the O-ring and inspect the collar for any damage in the area where the seal runs. Then replace the seal again. The seal itself does not have to be completely flush with the case, but it should be close, and even more importantly, should be square with the shaft.

BTW, the flat side of the sprocket goes out, the grooved side, in.

  • BIG HAL

Posted December 27, 2007 - 08:26 AM

#3

I use a Magnet I wouldn't beat on it cause you don't know how much to beat on it.. It just "floats" on the shaft so to speak.. you must put the seal on before the collar.. Also put some bearing grease on the lip of the seal and the oring. Work slow and easy and you'll be fine..:banghead: Good luck..

  • grayracer513

Posted December 27, 2007 - 08:39 AM

#4

I wouldn't beat on it cause you don't know how much to beat on it..

Who said to "beat on it?"

  • BIG HAL

Posted December 27, 2007 - 08:49 AM

#5

Who said to "beat on it?"


using a hammer constitutes beating.. I never hit my bike with a hammer.. A rubber mallet yes.:banghead:

  • usmcpaul

Posted December 27, 2007 - 09:00 AM

#6

Be sure to lube the sealing lips of the seal and the o-rings(if any) with clean oil before you install them to prevent tearing/cutting them. I personally don't use grease due to the fact that it has a tendency to trap dirt, but I know others that use it.

  • BIG HAL

Posted December 27, 2007 - 09:02 AM

#7

if you use grease it helps prevent burning the rubber lip of the seal and not to mention slips right in..

  • grayracer513

Posted December 27, 2007 - 09:11 AM

#8

Using a mallet when a hammer is called for is counterproductive, potetially hazardous in its own right, and not something a professional would do. Striking the shaft directly with a mallet is one approach, however, when a punch is used, as I recommended, a mallet is pointless and defeats the advantage of using the punch.

A punch situated in the center drilling of the shaft puts even less stress on the top threads of the shaft than a mallet does, and the "sting" of steel on steel (or brass, if a brass punch is available) is what does most of the work here. The shaft can be nudged back with far less actual force using a steel or brass hammer and punch that with a mallet, because the mallet will not deliver the same shock.

All that is required is a light, sharp tap or two. When you see the shaft move inward at all, that's all that's needed to unstick the collar. You can't move it too far with any remotely reasonable effort, nor damage anything in the process, unless you really get carried away.

  • BIG HAL

Posted December 27, 2007 - 09:30 AM

#9

Grayracer Your talkin to these people on the forums here like they're a pro ASE tech such as yourself and I too am ASE Cert. But you must keep in mind what you say to most of these newbies here on th TT forums most of these folks cant repair the stuff in the correct manner ya know thus keeps the techs workin.

  • 08YZ450Rider

Posted December 27, 2007 - 09:56 AM

#10

Dear Thumper Freinds;

I genuinely appreciate the tips you all left. I have good news, a mechanic freind of mine just happen to drop over and said that my new seal was not "uniformly-positioned" in the case. The seal position was adjusted, too slight to notice with my eye, and it leaks NOTHING now, not even a drop. I will take the collar removal techniques you guys gave me to heart and remember them for the next time.

By the way, I don't know if any of you have a new 08YZ450 but it is the absolute best 450 I have ever ridden, especially comparing it to other Yamahas. I have ridden Kawa, CRF, RMZ, and KTM, and this bike is by far the easiest to throw around as far as top heavy feeling. I will conceed that it is slower than my 06' YZ450, but I am actually faster on this bike because it is so much easier to ride and "flick" around.

A rider acquaintence of mine has an 05 YZ450 and I said, "hey steve, why don't you take my bike for a ride to feel the diferences in the bikes". He rode it 5 laps, and bought one 2 days later; albeit the white one so it did not look like a clone of my blue baby.

Anybody else have an opinion on it?

Visit the ThumperTalk Store for the lowest prices on motorcycle / ATV parts and accessories - Guaranteed
  • grayracer513

Posted December 27, 2007 - 10:04 AM

#11

I will conceed that it is slower than my 06' YZ450, ...

I don't know if you should concede that until after a heads up race. They said the same about the '06 vs. the '03/4 model, but I can tell you for a fact that the '06 is actually faster, whether it "feels" that way or not.

On your seal, that's what I meant when I said it was important that it sit square with the shaft. :banghead:

  • todds924

Posted December 27, 2007 - 09:16 PM

#12

I use a Magnet I wouldn't beat on it cause you don't know how much to beat on it.. It just "floats" on the shaft so to speak.. you must put the seal on before the collar.. Also put some bearing grease on the lip of the seal and the oring. Work slow and easy and you'll be fine..:busted: Good luck..


If you cannot take off the collar with your fingers, a magnet isn't going to do it either. They are tuff sometimes because of the o-ring and get stuck to the shaft. Like Gray said, put it in gear and work it with the pliers, it should pop off the shaft.:banghead:

  • todds924

Posted December 27, 2007 - 09:21 PM

#13

Grayracer Your talkin to these people on the forums here like they're a pro ASE tech such as yourself and I too am ASE Cert. But you must keep in mind what you say to most of these newbies here on th TT forums most of these folks cant repair the stuff in the correct manner ya know thus keeps the techs workin.


ASE Certified??????? Oh you must be talking about Automobiles.....My bad. That has nothing to do with working on bikes. :banghead:

  • grayracer513

Posted December 28, 2007 - 12:16 AM

#14

Grayracer Your talkin to these people on the forums here like they're a pro ASE tech such as yourself and I too am ASE Cert. But you must keep in mind what you say to most of these newbies here on th TT forums most of these folks cant repair the stuff in the correct manner ya know thus keeps the techs workin.

As a life long pro wrench with a 33 year career in the trade that has included custom bikes, race bikes, fabrication, and cars from dealerships to race cars (and multiple certifications, since you mention it), one of the things I have learned is that even though there is a certain amount of manual skill involved, by far most of what makes a really good mechanic is between his ears. I cannot give someone good hands, but I can tell him the right way to approach a problem, and why it works. I have faith in the intelligence of the average individual. I've made too many good technicians out of ordinary mechanics to believe otherwise.

  • BIG HAL

Posted December 28, 2007 - 06:21 AM

#15

Todd yes an Automobile Mechanic.. Duh. Gray as a life long pro for myself since 81 Drag racing, Assembly, fabrication,welder, Senior Master Ford Tech Honda,Toyota, Mercedes, Jag, Chevy, Cadillac, I've done it all from the Transmission to the engine and then ended up as a Drive ability Tech which takes more thinking and troubleshooting. I started racing X/C in 96 and working as a track support guy for the local Yamaha shop anyway I'm not here to try to compare here with you guys because the majority of y'all are not mechanics but defensive riders and people that can type. I stated earlier in the post about getting the seal out, I never had an issue getting the collar out so thats fine if you need to hit it for encouragement. That being said every time I post here ya'll get your feelins caught up in it, This is A FORUM for helping one another for the do it yourselves people right? Not for trying to act like an elementary kid and attack people here on the forum!!! Having faith in any individual is ok but you know as I do there are not very many good techs out there and I've seen em come and go as you have.. This is the profession with the most uneducated people and you get a bunch of dumb guys trying to accomplish but can't. That goes for the Motorcycle dealers too, there's usually only 1 good tech in each shop out of 6. You cant have faith in everyone Gray 3 out of ten guys on these forums can do the stuff right! yeah 30% not very many. Shoot how many can fix a check engine light on their own car? Yes Todd the cars and bikes engine are all made up of the same components. Amazing huh.. Gray are you filling in for Cannon I don't see him anymore??

  • Wiz636

Posted December 28, 2007 - 11:52 AM

#16

Shoot how many can fix a check engine light on their own car?


Hal, the 'service engine soon' light just came on in my '02 Chevy Duramax...how do I diagnose that?

  • SJMC_DON

Posted December 28, 2007 - 01:01 PM

#17

[quote name='Wiz636'][quote name='BIG HAL'] Shoot how many can fix a check engine light on their own car?QUOTE]

Hal, the 'service engine soon' light just came on in my '02 Chevy Duramax...how do I diagnose that?[/QUOTE]

1. Turn the key to the on position
2. Depress the gas pedal 18 times (rapidly)
3. Depress the gas pedal again 7 times (slowly)
4. Turn the key off.
5. Drink a beer.

Repeat until light goes off :busted:

The countershaft seal unless changed since 04' was never a problem for me to service, seemed pretty straight forward and I'm only a certified smart a**:banghead:

  • todds924

Posted December 28, 2007 - 03:59 PM

#18

Big Hal!!! I was just ribbin ya a little!!!!!!!:banghead: I agree with most of what you say but as far as the parts between a motorcycle and a car being the same?//// You havent been inside a new Kawi Concours 14. I have been doing this professionally for 26 years. I have seen "ASE" certified techs "MUCK" up some pretty simple operations on a bike, then bring it to me to fix. its just like me working on a car, i could get through it but just not as proficient as yourself.:busted: And one other thing, as far as saying the motorcycle profession has the most uneducated people? i've seen many more shady "car" mechanics in my lifetime. Like anything though there is good and bad in everything.

  • Wiz636

Posted December 28, 2007 - 04:02 PM

#19

[quote name='SJMC_DON'][quote name='Wiz636']

1. Turn the key to the on position
2. Depress the gas pedal 18 times (rapidly)
3. Depress the gas pedal again 7 times (slowly)
4. Turn the key off.
5. Drink a beer.

Repeat until light goes off :busted:

The countershaft seal unless changed since 04' was never a problem for me to service, seemed pretty straight forward and I'm only a certified smart a**:banghead:[/QUOTE]


Thanks Don, I knew about the beer part but not the rest! :D

  • soudry

Posted December 28, 2007 - 04:22 PM

#20

this is getting good....





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