Screwed the thread right out!! (come on everyone does it at some stage)


47 replies to this topic
  • 426 boy

Posted November 19, 2007 - 11:54 PM

#1

well!!!! What an embarrassing story. I bought a 2002 YZ426F and went to put a new oil filter in and found the bottom (allen key) bolts thread was getting a bit sloppy. Then a week later i screwed the whole thread out. (don't ask).:ride:

So i was wondering how i would go about fixing this??

the two top bolts threads are fine.

Thank you for your time.:thumbsup:

  • shawnspawn

Posted November 20, 2007 - 12:53 AM

#2

I think what you are saying is that you stripped the threads (on the block) by over-tightening the allen keyed bolt?

If that is what you have done, then you probably will have to use a Heli-coil to fix it. Basically it involves drilling out the bolt hole to a bigger specific size. Then adding a heli-coil which become the new threads.

I believe this the the best and strongest solution, as using thread lock or something else will only result in a poor filter cover seal.

http://www.helicoil.in/

Anyone else?

  • Ga426owner

Posted November 20, 2007 - 06:01 AM

#3

A TimeSert is much better for this


http://www.timesert.com/

  • grayracer513

Posted November 20, 2007 - 07:44 AM

#4

Heli-Coils make a good repair when done right, but any time a Time-Sert can be used instead, I highly recommend it, especially in any application that must be disassembled frequently or depends on the bolt seating squarely, as drain plugs do.

The insert should be between about 10mm long to as long as the threaded section of the lower bolt. It MUST be AT LEAST long enough to completely close off the drain hole that is drilled across the threads, or a loss of oil pressure will result.

See also: http://www.thumperta...ad.php?t=634724

  • tnl

Posted November 20, 2007 - 08:06 AM

#5

I'm due for one of those on the bottom 5mm bolt oil filter hole. I think that the timesert is the best method right?

  • Ga426owner

Posted November 20, 2007 - 08:19 AM

#6

I'm due for one of those on the bottom 5mm bolt oil filter hole. I think that the timesert is the best method right?


I have found that for this bottom oil filter hole...the TimeSert is a permanent fix

Hey btw do you know how to avoid this from happening on every Yami 400-450?
never over tighten this bolt - it is rather soft and will stretch especiially on 98-05 models. Once stretched it is toast
- also, always clean the threads of the bolt and hole with contact or brake cleaner with changing oil. Fine metal particles start the process of eating up the threads eventually causing them to strip out. The little hole in there also can be filled and will be with a TimeSert - it holds metal particles.....:thumbsup:

  • albertaguy

Posted November 20, 2007 - 08:34 AM

#7

my comment was to always have brake cleaner on hand. I use it around the area first then to flush the drain hole and bolts. If it's feeling gritty when threading back in then stop and clean it. I usually try threading it in by hand as far as I can first. I've never heard of the timesert before but that sounds like something worth having in the tool box just incase.

  • grayracer513

Posted November 20, 2007 - 08:45 AM

#8

Hey btw do you know how to avoid this from happening on every Yami 400-450? ...

Let me add this:

The manual tells you to back that bolt out and use let the oil filter well drain out through it. This is possible because the threads are cross drilled into the filter well. This clever procedure lets oil from the filter well, which is full of all that wonderful crap that didn't get past the filter, to run into those threads. Then, as GA correctly points out, they damage the threads a bit at a time as you run the bolt back in. "Draining" the filter well that way doesn't work well anyway, since the well isn't vented.

My solution to that is to not follow the manual procedure on that point. What I do instead is to remove the upper two bolts first, then get the lower one out as quickly as I can, and just let the oil run to the outside. You should find, especially after a while of doing it this way, that the bolt will thread back in much more smoothly without having to "chase" the threads in the hole with a tap each time.

Interestingly, this is another benefit to the Time-Sert for this repair; it closes off the cross drillway in that hole.

  • shawnspawn

Posted November 20, 2007 - 09:26 AM

#9

Wow I had never seen a TimeSert before, little more work but a better product for sure. :thumbsup:

  • Wiz636

Posted November 20, 2007 - 11:34 AM

#10

I remove the filter cover the way Gray describes. Before reassembly I clean out the threads using a couple q-tips and then check it by gently threading the bolt in by hand and feeling for any roughness. Sometimes I will carefully run a 6 X 1.0 tap through the threads also.

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  • bkklett

Posted November 20, 2007 - 12:36 PM

#11

I had a XR250 I once striped the drain on. I found a rubber drain plug insert from an automotive place. (IT may be what yuo discribed earlier- not sure) It lasted for 5 years. I would change oil often.

  • Ga426owner

Posted November 20, 2007 - 12:41 PM

#12

I had a XR250 I once striped the drain on. I found a rubber drain plug insert from an automotive place. (IT may be what yuo discribed earlier- not sure) It lasted for 5 years. I would change oil often.


Please no offense meant, :ride:
Glad this worked for you and your XR.....but there is no way a rubber expandable boat plug will cut it except to get me back to my truck.....
and there is always the option for a rubber cork from Home Depot......they cost about 45cents
:thumbsup:

  • todds924

Posted November 20, 2007 - 06:06 PM

#13

Please no offense meant, :busted:
Glad this worked for you and your XR.....but there is no way a rubber expandable boat plug will cut it except to get me back to my truck.....
and there is always the option for a rubber cork from Home Depot......they cost about 45cents
:thumbsup:


Thats FUNNY!!!!:ride:

  • 642MX

Posted November 20, 2007 - 06:18 PM

#14

I lay my bike on the side to change the filter. Oil doesn't run out of the hole and get all over the motor, and no particles get caught in the threads. Once I pull the filter out, I use a couple paper towels to absorb the oil where the filter sits.

  • grayracer513

Posted November 20, 2007 - 08:51 PM

#15

Laying the bike down doesn't bypass the chip problem. The threaded hole is cross drilled into the filter well, and is open at the bottom. In that position, the oil will run slowly from the well through the threads, and into the primary case. It may be that because the hole is vertical, the chips and debris do not tend to gather in the threads as when they are horizontal, however.

  • 642MX

Posted November 21, 2007 - 06:35 AM

#16

It may be that because the hole is vertical, the chips and debris do not tend to gather in the threads as when they are horizontal, however.


Maybe thats it. When the bike it up right oil comes out of the hole along with shavings. When its on the side there isn't any oil or shavings in the hole.

  • grayracer513

Posted November 21, 2007 - 08:42 AM

#17

Maybe thats it. When the bike it up right oil comes out of the hole along with shavings. When its on the side there isn't any oil or shavings in the hole.

The oil is running into that hole at a point halfway down the threads and out the bottom, into the engine, though, so some of the junk is going back into your engine.

  • 642MX

Posted November 21, 2007 - 09:07 AM

#18

The oil is running into that hole at a point halfway down the threads and out the bottom, into the engine, though, so some of the junk is going back into your engine.


Interesting. But, it hasn't caused any problems.....yet. I guess, since I change my oil every ride, maybe it doesn't matter.

So, in order to properly drain the filter cavity, one should actually lean the bike over on the right side to make sure all the dirty oil comes out....right?..

  • grayracer513

Posted November 21, 2007 - 09:14 AM

#19

That's what makes the most sense to me. Of course, it's messy.

  • 642MX

Posted November 21, 2007 - 09:22 AM

#20

I bet it would be messy. I may give it a shot next time and see how it goes.

So I wonder why manufactures don't locate the filter under the motor? The skid plate would have to be removed, but you would have an easier way to get the filter out (and the old oil) without making a mess.

Or maybe they could use a mini spin on filter like an ATV has?

Maybe I should go back to school and become an engineer.......:thumbsup:





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