Transformed: XR600sm


18 replies to this topic
  • FoolishMortal

Posted November 11, 2007 - 10:54 PM

#1

Hey - get away from my bike! :ride:

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Oh, it's just Paul. :thumbsup:

Paul works with me. He's been with Cycle Gear for 22 years and I'm damned lucky to have him on my team. In addition to everything else he's done, he used to run the CG salvage yard (when there was one) and has R&R'd many, many bikes. He agreed to help me with the transformation. That means he did most of the work and I fed him.

The project: Turn a '94 XR600r into a supermoto. I (we) used the following:

Eibach springs, front and rear
Race-Tech gold valves, front
Love from Phil at Aftershocks (heal up!)
Warp 9 wheels, laced to stock hubs with Buchanan heavy-duty spokes
BikeMaster tubes inside Pilot Power tires (120 front, 150 rear)
Renthal 520 chain, front and rear sprockets
EBC Pro-Lite Contour 320mm front rotor
EBC stock-size Contour rear rotor
EBC sintered front pads

It still needs some work on the plastics and the electrical system, but it should be a blast! I also have an oil cooler to add (so that I can do some distance) and a new headlight bracket to get fabbed up.

Details:

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  • sploogemonkey

Posted November 12, 2007 - 04:55 AM

#2

Nice lookin bike. :thumbsup:

Been thinking about installing a set of Gold Valves on my XR600 also. mine is staying dirt only, though.

  • martinfan30

Posted November 12, 2007 - 10:03 AM

#3

nice tard! whats the gold valve? valve stem?

  • FoolishMortal

Posted November 12, 2007 - 10:24 AM

#4

The Gold Valve Kit is part of the internals for the front forks. The XR has a cartridge-style valving system and the old valves were horrible. In short, the valves work with the associated shim stack to control the flow of oil in the fork to provide "damping" - a way to influence how a spring compresses and rebounds.

From the Race Tech site:

"Gold Valve Fork Kits

Race Tech's original bolt-on fork valving system for cartridge forks.

Stock valving pistons have very restrictive ports. This makes it impossible to get the ultimate results with the stock pistons. Gold Valves triple the flow area putting valving control on the shim stack instead of the overly restricted stock piston. This results in outstanding tuneability, improved control, traction, plushness and bottoming resistance."

I rode it to work today and although things (brake pads, rotors, suspension, tires) aren't seated/bedded/broken in yet, it definitely rides far better with the suspension done. :thumbsup:

  • sploogemonkey

Posted November 12, 2007 - 10:57 AM

#5

I installed a set of GV's on my street bike and it made a world of difference in how the forks worked over rough sections and hard cornering.

Here's what the kit looks like pre-installation:
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And here's the Gold Valve installed with the new shim stack, and the old stock valve (black) sitting off to the left.
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I recently bought some heavier springs for my XR from Race Tech, and was considering GV's for both the forks and the shock, but money is gettin kinda tight right now. Maybe in the near future?

  • martinfan30

Posted November 12, 2007 - 11:33 AM

#6

is it an easy install? cost?

  • FoolishMortal

Posted November 12, 2007 - 11:42 AM

#7

Cost is about $180. Installation is dead easy - remove the fork legs, take them to your local suspension shop and hand over your credit card. :thumbsup:

  • sploogemonkey

Posted November 12, 2007 - 12:14 PM

#8

Cost is about $180. Installation is dead easy - remove the fork legs, take them to your local suspension shop and hand over your credit card. :thumbsup:


:ride: :busted:

I think the key phrase there is "suspension specialist".

I installed the gold valves myself. There is no way I would trust a wrench in an average shop who works on commission to do a shock or fork modification for me.

Either do it yourself, or spend the money and have a suspension expert do it for you. For gawds sake, don't expect a local motorcycle shop to take the time or have the expertise to do it right.

  • martinfan30

Posted November 12, 2007 - 12:28 PM

#9

i am actually a toyota tech. so my mech. inclination is better than most(not to sound big headed!). so would i need any special tools?

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  • sploogemonkey

Posted November 12, 2007 - 01:25 PM

#10

Here's a photo showing all the tools I needed to do the install on my Kawasaki ZRX1100.

Only thing not showing is the shop vise on my work bench. I imagine the tools necessary for an XR will be about the same. Whole job only took a few hours. easily an afternoon job.

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  • martinfan30

Posted November 12, 2007 - 02:38 PM

#11

whats the striker for? and the wire under it?

  • FoolishMortal

Posted November 12, 2007 - 03:15 PM

#12

:ride: :busted:

I think the key phrase there is "suspension specialist".

I installed the gold valves myself. There is no way I would trust a wrench in an average shop who works on commission to do a shock or fork modification for me.

Either do it yourself, or spend the money and have a suspension expert do it for you. For gawds sake, don't expect a local motorcycle shop to take the time or have the expertise to do it right.


Good point. I wasn't clear. :thumbsup:

I didn't mean to let the shop-monkeys have at it. I meant to suggest that you go to (or send the parts to) someone who knows suspension, especially since you might as well have the shims checked while you're in there... I sent my bits to Aftershocks, but there are any of a number of competent suspension shops out there, including Catalyst Racing, Evolution, Lindemann and a host of others.

  • sploogemonkey

Posted November 12, 2007 - 03:21 PM

#13

whats the striker for? and the wire under it?





The striker is for the torch (it's pictured above the hammer in my photo), and the wire is about an 18" length of flexible speaker wire that I used to suspend the damper rod assembly up in the air while I threaded the fork cap onto it. (Good ol' backyard mek-a-nik technology there.:thumbsup: )

Remember! These photos are from when I did my ZRX1100. I have not installed a gold valve on my 600.....yet.

So these photos are just a possible representation of what is necessary to do a set of XR forks.

If and when I do mine, I'll take a bunch of photos and do a step by step tutorial. It really isn't all that hard, especially for someone like yourself who is an actual Tech.

In my ZRX's case, I had to heat up the bottom of the cartridge tube in order to release the stock valve assembly. Since the cartridge tube is aluminum, you really can't effectively hold it in the vise without damaging it, and the factory loads up the threads with some seriously strong thread locking compound, so heating it up is the only way to go.

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This image shows the valve assembly (silver unit) removed from the bottom of the cartridge tube and ready to be replaced with the gold valve and the new shim stack.

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  • martinfan30

Posted November 12, 2007 - 03:31 PM

#14

:thumbsup: very cool! thx.

  • Slim Shadetree

Posted November 12, 2007 - 09:52 PM

#15

what kind of oil cooler set up are you using on your 600 ?

  • FoolishMortal

Posted November 12, 2007 - 09:59 PM

#16

what kind of oil cooler set up are you using on your 600 ?


It's not on yet and likely will require some fabrication for the lines. I picked up a very clean cooler from a Honda TRX400 (ATV). I think I'll take it to a radiator shop and see what can be done about using or creating some universal fittings.

I'm going to re-wire most of the bike to clean things up. While I'm at it, I'll dump the stock headlight (sucks) and have a friend fab up a bracket to hold the cooler, a pair of lights and a slightly larger screen.

I'll post about it when it's done. :thumbsup:

  • sploogemonkey

Posted November 12, 2007 - 11:06 PM

#17

Lookin' forward to hearing about your oil cooler fab' project.

I'm planning on fabricating my own mounts to hook up an oil cooler also, just haven't decided on the materials yet. It'll probably be a while until I get to it though.

In the meantime, I'll be checkin' out how other people do theirs so I can borrow some ideas.

  • Newxrowner

Posted November 14, 2007 - 08:44 AM

#18

The bike looks great! I sure hated to get rid of it, but it found a good home to say the least!

  • FoolishMortal

Posted November 14, 2007 - 10:31 AM

#19

The bike looks great! I sure hated to get rid of it, but it found a good home to say the least!


Hey, it's good to hear from you! Yes, the bike has gone to a loving home...

<<< For more info, check out My Garage.

:thumbsup:





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