Front-end washing out or bike stand straight up..will springs help?


15 replies to this topic
  • TWILES

Posted October 22, 2007 - 06:40 AM

#1

I went to my first XC race yesterday and it would have been insain if the front-end didn't wash out or the whole bike stands straight up evey time I tried to turn it. I could have made it better but the trail was bearly wide enough for handlebars and you had to turn constantly so after a lap I gave up. I've never really noticed this before but I've never ridden trails that tight either. I'd try following a fast guy and do what he did and I could keep up until I had to turn 5 times in 20 feet and that was it. I'm like 80lbs too heavy for the stock one's and I've asked about suspension plenty of times but I'm finally getting an understanding of what I guess I've been asking about. I know my abilities are part of the problem aswell but I can fix that myself if I can get this straight.

  • WR_Dave

Posted October 22, 2007 - 09:31 AM

#2

It can't be stated enough to get the proper sag settings on your bike and it should fix some of your issues. To get the proper sag settings you may have to go to different springs and valving. WR Dave

  • JSanfilippo

Posted October 22, 2007 - 10:02 AM

#3

Is the front tire a D 739?

  • clark4131

Posted October 22, 2007 - 10:55 AM

#4

The problem your having is likely a combination of three things...tires, suspension, technique. I've found that these bikes like softer tires up front. For whatever reason, regardless of terrain, a soft compound up front will do wonders in eliminating washing out. Next, you've got to have the proper weight to spring ratio front and back, with the proper weight fluid and level, and the proper valving, though the valving is not as critical. I eliminated 99% of my issues with stiffer springs and 7.5 weight oil filled up a little higher than stock. Since I'm not jumping the thing more than 4 or 5 feet off the ground, I never touched the valving.

Once you've got the proper equipment, then your technique is the final piece of the puzzle. If you're not weighting that front wheel going into a turn, you're screwed, end of story. There's a reason that the seat goes up the tank...that's where your crotch goes when you hit a turn. I had the hardest time learning that, as I always had a tendency to keep the back tire weighted, because I run a lot of hills and a lot of loose DG and sand washes. Once I pulled my head out, I found myself railing the turns...the worst part is, I figured this out fairly recent.

Now there are some other issues that contribute like fork height in the triple clamps, and tire pressure, but those are more fine-tuning tweaks. Also, the above is just opinion based on my experience. I don't race and I don't have a bike shop other than my do-it-yourself version of Monster Garage. But, I've dealt with this exact issue for a while, so take it for what it's worth...SC

  • TWILES

Posted October 22, 2007 - 01:24 PM

#5

my do-it-yourself version of Monster Garage.


That hits home way too hard:applause:

You explained everything clearly. Would I be beating a dead horse by trying to get this bike set up for tight XC racing? It really reminded me of my first real bad-ass quad. I rounded up a 1987 500 Quadracer and talked Dad into letting me MX it when I was 16. It was the sh!t in all the places the WR prevails BUT in closed course racing it just wasn't ment to be so he bought me a 1989 Honda 250R later that year. Something about yesterday sparked something in me. I haven't raced anything since my dad died 4 years ago and I was good enough for Pro-Am atv MX on a national level. We sank a lot of money into that 500 before giving up and getting with the program like everyone else. I don't want to do that again.

  • Mutu

Posted October 22, 2007 - 02:39 PM

#6

I had the front end washing out problem when I first got my bike Twiles.
I changed the front tire to a Dunlop 952 (front and back) and that certainly helped stop it.

Ever since I got my suspension set up properly (springs and revalve) the problem is eliminated completely.
I cannot stress how great proper suspension set up is.

  • CORider63

Posted October 22, 2007 - 02:44 PM

#7

Ditto. Except I went with a Dunlop 756 front. It was like night and day in the washout department.

  • rapala3182

Posted October 22, 2007 - 08:57 PM

#8

my 06 450 washed out on every other turn when I got it. I replaced the front tire and that almost stopped the problem completely. I went with the Maxxis IT Front and rear best tire I have run yet.

Visit the ThumperTalk Store for the lowest prices on motorcycle / ATV parts and accessories - Guaranteed
  • kskyles

Posted October 23, 2007 - 09:42 AM

#9

i had the same issues that you are having. i'm about 215 lbs. i've got an 05 with a 5.8 spring on the rear shock, and i thought i had the sag set correctly. i had problems with the front washing out, so i adjusted the clickers and changed to a softer front tire - maxxis IT.

recently i had a serious fork leak, and decided to bite the bullet and get the forks rebuilt by a pro. it was money well spent. he revalved the forks, shimmed the springs, and went with a 7.5 weight oil. then he set the sag for me, correctly this time, and things are amazing.

it was the best money i've spent on the bike. it turns well, soaks up chop, and flies through whoops. i'm going to have him service the rear shock next, and i'm excited to have it done.

i'm not a racer, but i would think that the WR with a good suspension set up would compete with almost anything out there.

  • TWILES

Posted October 23, 2007 - 12:51 PM

#10

The weight of the bike is obviously not an issue because I saw 450X's, and the heavier 450KTM's flying along with a 07+ WR with an old fat guy on it.

  • suzukirmz450

Posted December 04, 2007 - 11:42 PM

#11

Weight your outside peg and if the bike drops give the throttle a squirt

  • SID013

Posted December 05, 2007 - 02:32 AM

#12

I had the same problem even after getting the suspension done professionally. After advice I went to a Dunlop 952 but the front end would still skip out about 3 foot then grab so I changed to the new Motoz Tracula tyres which are available here in Oz, They are a full motocross tyre for soft sandy stuff. This fixed it & I now have the confidence to go harder into the corners.

Tyres & suspension as Clarke says.

Cheers

  • TWILES

Posted December 05, 2007 - 10:09 AM

#13

I think I'm going to get the Maxxis SI's. It says they were developed for the GNCC's which is basically what kind of area's I ride in. Hot-Shot XC racer is on hold for now. Money is getting tight. My work is picking up but my wife's sales commision has dropped dramatically.

  • C-P

Posted December 05, 2007 - 08:30 PM

#14

I think I'm going to get the Maxxis SI's. It says they were developed for the GNCC's which is basically what kind of area's I ride in. Hot-Shot XC racer is on hold for now. Money is getting tight. My work is picking up but my wife's sales commision has dropped dramatically.



Ditto 6 times or whatever on the front tire. If you have Dunlop 739's on the front (don't think you mentioned?), start there - they plain SUCK. I went with a 756 frt/739rear which was fine until I raced my first mudfest this year. The rear 739 goes next as it pulls zero traction in mud.

  • muffinman

Posted December 05, 2007 - 10:20 PM

#15

i love the mich s12 on the front will not use any other tyre,it just does not wash, period. the second point id make is be more aggressive, i no this is hard to do,but just get out there find a patch of soft sand and start throwing, manhandling the bike around. once youve mastered turning in soft sand every other turn is easy:ride:

  • new2blu

Posted January 16, 2008 - 07:53 PM

#16

Ditto 6 times or whatever on the front tire. If you have Dunlop 739's on the front (don't think you mentioned?), start there - they plain SUCK. I went with a 756 frt/739rear which was fine until I raced my first mudfest this year. The rear 739 goes next as it pulls zero traction in mud.

The 739's really do suck--- they should be a dual sport tire!!




 
x

Join Our Community!

Even if you don't want to post, registered members get access to tools that make finding & following the good stuff easier.

If you enjoyed reading about "" here in the ThumperTalk archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join ThumperTalk today!

The views and opinions expressed on this page are strictly those of the author, and have not been reviewed or approved by ThumperTalk.