Does anyone use the GYTR needle?


16 replies to this topic
  • nickeenoo

Posted October 09, 2007 - 03:41 PM

#1

Hi,

Just wondering if anyone uses the GYTR needle? I am asking, because it just seems standard practice the everyone buys the JD jet kit. I am cheap and don't want to spend the money for another jet kit as I already bought one with the AIS removal kit. Is it worth trying to dial in the GYTR kit or is it a waste of time. And if you are running the GYTR needle what are your other jetting specs.

Thanks,

Nate

  • STLHDR

Posted October 09, 2007 - 04:04 PM

#2

I am in Utah as well (SLC) and usually ride up to 9000' I use the GYTR needle and the stock pilot, 45. the 48 in the kit was too rich for the elavation on my 05 WR450. I have opened the airbox, grey wire disconect, TT AIS removal, GYTR exhast insert, Zip-Ty fuel screw 1 1/2 to 2 turns out depending on elavation. The GYTR needle works great, I'm on the 4th clip.

  • WR450RICKO

Posted October 09, 2007 - 06:43 PM

#3

Everything STLHDR has done, I have also done to my 06 wr450. I did put in the 48 pilot that came with the kit. I also have my fuel screw out 2 3/4 turns. I run from Sea Level to 5000 feet on this setting with smooth power through the throttle range and no decel popping. I get 30+/- dirt mpg on average. I hit 96 mph on stock gearing. Bike is perfect and reliable.

  • gdm

Posted October 10, 2007 - 09:04 AM

#4

I also run the GYTR needle with no problems. Clip 4th slot, 165 main, 48 pilot, fuel screw 2.5 out, FMF Ti Powercore. I ride from 2000-8000 ft. and the bike is a rocket ship! :confused:

  • BajaFool

Posted October 10, 2007 - 09:45 AM

#5

You haven't told us what year motorcycle you have. However, for info, I installed the complete GYT-R kit in my 2006. I found that the kit jetting was a little on the rich side at 3,000ft and up, I got 30+ MPG. I switched to the jetting specs for the 2004 model and the bike runs great from below sea level to 5,000ft+. On a recent near 100 mile ride, which was a combination of tight single track, two track four wheel drive roads and graded dirt roads, I averaged 46 MPG --- pretty good mileage I think. This is better MPG than my friend's new stock jetted 2007 KTM450EXC on the same ride. We rode from 3,200-4,000ft in Baja California, Mexico.

Recent wisdom from the Dirt Rider magazine staff is to leave the jetting stock on the 2007 model and do all of the other GYT-R AIS mods. The result is a bike that runs well at the lower altitudes, great at 7,000ft+ and you will get phenomenal MPG (with no figure specified). On a recent ride to Laguna Hanson, in Mexico, a friend on a new 2007 with stock jetting averaged 60MPG on terrain as I described above.

  • nickeenoo

Posted October 10, 2007 - 10:08 AM

#6

Thanks All,

I have a 2007, sorry I forgot that small detail.

BajaFool,
When Dirt Rider left the jetting stock did that include the needle?

Thanks,

Nate

  • JSanfilippo

Posted October 10, 2007 - 11:16 AM

#7

Recent wisdom from the Dirt Rider magazine staff is to leave the jetting stock on the 2007 model and do all of the other GYT-R AIS mods.


I beg to differ. I ran the bike down the block with all the free mods done with the stock jetting (162mj, 45pj, the stock NFNT needle) and the bike had a nasty midrange bog before pulling hard again. Doing the 48pj, 165mj, and the JD red needle along with the o-ring mod makes it pull super hard across the RPM range.

On a free modded stock bike, the very least anyone should do (0-5000ft) is the YZ/AIS needle and the 165 mj. The 45 pj would be ok, but the fuel screw would have to be turned out at least 2 turns out.

  • JSanfilippo

Posted October 10, 2007 - 11:17 AM

#8

I'd like to add that the bike with stock baffle and closed airbox pulled very good with the stock jetting

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  • BajaFool

Posted October 10, 2007 - 07:37 PM

#9

Well there you go Nickeenoo, opinions are what make a horse race. You should be the judge, however of what is best for your situation.

What follows is the exerpt from the October 2007 Dirt Rider 450 shootout article entitled 2007 450 Off-Road Comparison: "Making the Yamaha Run. It is pretty easy to make the WR go from snore to score. Just buy the GYTR kit (GYT-5TJ93-69-01, $49.95) that includes the shorter throttle stop, a block-off kit for the Air Induction System (AIS) and a set of jets that bump the power by richening the jetting, then follow the included instructions. This is how we tested the bike in Costa Rica for its debut and in our first test. But in light of current standards and enforcements here in California, we also came up with the setting that we tested the bike in for this comparison. We used the shorter throttle stop, took out only the smallest stuffer from the muffler and removed the restrictor from the top of the airbox. We also disconnected the gray wire at the six-pin connector underneath the left sidepanel. We left the stock jetting in the bike and did not mess with the AIS, as it has no performance effect on the engine aside from causing the lean popping noises inside the exhaust. With this setting, we felt the bike was more ridable and smoother in the smaller throttle positions than the GYTR-jetted bike, and it got better fuel economy. Plus, it ran better at elevations above 7000 feet."

Finally, leaving the stock jetting alone as mentioned in the article would seem to imply that the stock needle was not changed. However, I would still get rid of the AIS, if you want to go with the Dirt Rider recommended jetting, because listening to it pop is annoying and may cover up a lean jetting problem.

  • nickeenoo

Posted October 11, 2007 - 06:00 AM

#10

Thanks All,

I think I will leave the GYTR needle in and mess with the jetting. If I understand correctly, the GYTR needle is slightly leaner than the JD needle.

When I got the GYTR kit, the kit was missing the 110 main air jet so I just left it out and did the rest of the kit as directed in the instructions. The bike actually ran quite well although slightly rich. I think I will remove the main air jet (I have since put it in), and run the jetting a little leaner than the GYTR kit says. I will report on my luck (or lack thereof).

Also, I just ordered a full DRD exhaust, so that should make it interesting.

It just seems foolish to buy the GYTR kit ($49.95) that comes with an adjustable needle and turn around and buy a JD kit ($72.15) to get another adjustable needle. Maybe there is a big difference in needles, but I haven't read anything where there is a good comparison, it just seems that the standard answer is "Buy the JD kit". Has anyone "really" tried to use the GYTR needle? Or, does everyone just get the JD kit because that seems to be the standard answer?

I don't mean to sound harsh, just wanting some answers.

Thanks,

Nate

  • nickeenoo

Posted October 11, 2007 - 06:07 AM

#11

Well there you go Nickeenoo, opinions are what make a horse race. You should be the judge, however of what is best for your situation.

What follows is the exerpt from the October 2007 Dirt Rider 450 shootout article entitled 2007 450 Off-Road Comparison: "Making the Yamaha Run. It is pretty easy to make the WR go from snore to score. Just buy the GYTR kit (GYT-5TJ93-69-01, $49.95) that includes the shorter throttle stop, a block-off kit for the Air Induction System (AIS) and a set of jets that bump the power by richening the jetting, then follow the included instructions. This is how we tested the bike in Costa Rica for its debut and in our first test. But in light of current standards and enforcements here in California, we also came up with the setting that we tested the bike in for this comparison. We used the shorter throttle stop, took out only the smallest stuffer from the muffler and removed the restrictor from the top of the airbox. We also disconnected the gray wire at the six-pin connector underneath the left sidepanel. We left the stock jetting in the bike and did not mess with the AIS, as it has no performance effect on the engine aside from causing the lean popping noises inside the exhaust. With this setting, we felt the bike was more ridable and smoother in the smaller throttle positions than the GYTR-jetted bike, and it got better fuel economy. Plus, it ran better at elevations above 7000 feet."

Finally, leaving the stock jetting alone as mentioned in the article would seem to imply that the stock needle was not changed. However, I would still get rid of the AIS, if you want to go with the Dirt Rider recommended jetting, because listening to it pop is annoying and may cover up a lean jetting problem.

Now that you post it I remember reading it. Thanks for looking it up.

Nate

  • JSanfilippo

Posted October 11, 2007 - 10:50 AM

#12

I think most people use the JD kit just because all the testing was done. Its a follow the instructions and drop it in deal.

  • nickeenoo

Posted October 11, 2007 - 04:40 PM

#13

I think most people use the JD kit just because all the testing was done. Its a follow the instructions and drop it in deal.

Fair enough. I suppose I'll guinea pig myself and see if I can get the GYTR needle to work. If so, everyone can take the $72 from the JD kit and buy a new rear tire. They definitely don't last long on these 450's.

Nate

  • TWILES

Posted October 12, 2007 - 03:01 PM

#14

I have an 05 and it ran like shit until I got the AIS off and changed to the stock 05 YZ needle (NFLR I think) and did that help! It has NO off idle problems and pulls perfect all the way till it drops off at the rev limiter.

  • Bleeds_Blue

Posted October 12, 2007 - 09:07 PM

#15

Anybody tried other jetting kits?

  • Fullbore4

Posted October 12, 2007 - 10:23 PM

#16

Hi,

Just wondering if anyone uses the GYTR needle? I am asking, because it just seems standard practice the everyone buys the JD jet kit. I am cheap and don't want to spend the money for another jet kit as I already bought one with the AIS removal kit. Is it worth trying to dial in the GYTR kit or is it a waste of time. And if you are running the GYTR needle what are your other jetting specs.

Thanks,

Nate


I haven't looked at a GYTR needle but an 06 needle with only one groove (no others for adjustment) measures about .001 inch bigger diameter throughout than a JD Red with clip in 4th slot from top. I found my 06 WR450 ran as good if not a little better, with the stock needle shimmed with 2 small washers (richer) than using the JD red in 4th slot. The JD needles claim to have triiple taper instead of double taper like stock needles so they might be a little more refined.

  • tmckeown

Posted October 13, 2007 - 01:49 AM

#17

You just go to the local dealer and get 4 needles which are on the manual-list.
Remember every bike is individual, so you need to check air-fuelratio either on a dyno or then have gizmo that records it while you're driving. Bying just a needle won't give you best result.
We can give you several advices but still the best result should be tested.
Once you get it right, it won't change too much and weather etc. is easier to calculate.

Timo McKeown




 
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