Whew! Just finished a 13 hour WR450 street legal lighting conversion


10 replies to this topic
  • Rich_in_Orlando

Posted October 06, 2007 - 08:36 PM

#1

Man, I'm beat. A friend of mine has an '04 WR450 with a tag that until about an hour ago had none of the accouterments that constitute what makes a bike "street legal". I don't like attracting attention while dual sport riding so I offered to convert his bike's lighting to meet minimum Florida requirements. So that means hi/lo headlight with high beam indicator, front and rear brake light switches and brake light, horn, tag light and have all of it wired to a battery that keeps the lights on if the bike is not running. I also installed a Trailtech computer for a speedo and odometer.

My first challenge had been with the bike's previous owner, who had rewired part of the lighting circuit to include a light on/off toggle switch. The problem was compounded by the fact that copy of the electrical schematic I had wasn't accurate and most of the wire loom wire colors in the schematic did not correspond with the wire colors on his bike.

Anyway, I eventually was able to accomplish all of my goals except for one; that is I wasn't able to connect the lights to the battery. I took the current from the headlight wires, rectified them, and fed that out to the rest of the lighting circuit. I needed to rectify the current because there were several LEDs in the lighting scheme and they needed DC to operate properly. Also, I intended to connect the current to the existing battery and run the whole electrical system from the battery. But I couldn't find a way to do this. Any current route I chose would have caused a short because I measured DC voltage on both the ground and the generator circuit (analogous to + and - DC current) of the lighting circuit. I think this is why on these bikes the ground has to be physically floated at the stator to be able to connect the rectified lighting circuit to the battery. I probed around looking for a way to connect but was unsuccessful.

I am soliciting comments form those who have tried this on their own. Am I right about floating the ground or are there other workarounds? This was much easier on the kickstart only bikes. I can always add a second small battery but I was hoping for a more elegant solutions. Thanks.

  • gregk

Posted October 07, 2007 - 04:32 AM

#2

I have exactly the same model, bought used and with only headlight and taillight on AC, and a broken hydraulic switch on the rear brake wired to the stop light (so no stop light...). I got quite far in the street legal stuff (stop light, head light with high beam, low beam, "parking beam" and turn signals. Basically for DC I just added new wires directly to the battery, negative directly on the battery - connector (mass), and the positive behind the battery fuse box (so that it is fuse protected). You could go to + and - direct connection to the battery connectors, but I would add an additional fuse in this case, to avoid fuseless wiring which may be dangerous imho...The new wires are simply routed under the seat, along the stock ones...
Used the DC for turn indicator (LED) and 1 of my head lamp (I call this "parking beam". The second lamp of the low beam and the 2 high beam lights (I have a 4 halogen headlight plate) are wired to the old AC. So I have 3 position: parking= 1low light, low = 2 low light, high = 2 high lamp + 1 low lamp. The tail light and stop light are both aslo wired to AC, so there is no big drain on the battery, but I still have 1 front lamp without the motor running, and the wiring is simple. The commodos is a used street bike commodo I bough on Ebay, I even used the horn switch as a new killswitch (my original kill switch has bad contact adn was becoming more and more difficult to use, I had to press like crazy on it to make it work :confused: ).
I have adapted a mechanical switch on the front break lever, and probably will replace the rear hydraulic switch when changing brake oil. Not sure as the front brake is the main brake on the street anyway :confused:

I guess this setup is not strictly street legal in your area, but may pass. Here in Belgium I guess it is, as the WR is sold with just front and tail light, not even stop light, as street legal here (We are lucky! but not so for land use regulation :confused: :confused:), I added all the stuff because I was tired of using my arm as turn indicators and it make it safer to drive at night if I am late coming back from a trail...having a stoplight is also a plus for security, even without rear brake (which would not show motor braking anyway).

No problem of drained battery or unreliable electric system, so I am quite happy with my simple solution (no rectifying diode needed, just a few meter of electric wires) and it can give you ideas even if you have more legal requirements than I did...

Greg

  • las_vegas_thumper

Posted October 07, 2007 - 01:38 PM

#3

Holy WRotten WRelish Batman! I am trying to find out some info on the "best" aftermarket D/S kit to get for my '05 450 and '03 250 and after reading this post I know you guys know this stuff well. Do you have any suggestions for the layman that does not have the ability to get into this technical stuff? I know Baja, but heard they are junk. Thoughts?

  • gregk

Posted October 08, 2007 - 12:46 AM

#4

Sorry, can not really help you on this: I never looked after "ready to plug" dual sport kit.
You may want to reconsider though, and think about making your own: you will save big bucks and it is not difficult...
I am a bad mechanic (mainly due to lack of experience and proper tools) and would not try for now anything complex like motor or fork disassembly. However, electric stuff on a bike that already have an AC and DC supply (alternator AND battery) is really easy, just access to wires, connect new derivations, add fuse for protection, and you are done. Basically you need wires, eventually new fuses, switches, 2 or 4 LED turn signal with the associated electronic on/off box (take the 2 wire variant, real easy to use), and a commodo (the stuff you mount on your bar with all the commands), that you can get from any street bike (check that it is the same diameter as your bars).
Compared to other task, electric is easy, clean (no grease!), dot not required a lot of strength (no sweat with bad screws or seized parts, no need to lift the bike on a stand), and require only a mutimeter and a cutter as special tools...with maybe the soldering iron as a nice to have.

It may be me only, but I wish all the other stuff are as nice as electric work, as long as you take your time, think about wiring before you cut, nothing bad can happen :confused: ....I tried to change a tire for example, and even if advices from the net and instruction video helped, I still ruined my tube and scratched my wheels...:confused:

  • Rich_in_Orlando

Posted October 08, 2007 - 05:54 AM

#5

Ahh, I get it...commodo = handlebar switch. I was confused by your first post.

Visit the ThumperTalk Store for the lowest prices on motorcycle / ATV parts and accessories - Guaranteed
  • gregk

Posted October 08, 2007 - 07:53 AM

#6

Ahh, I get it...commodo = handlebar switch. I was confused by your first post.


Oups, sorry...french only term I guess...I will remember the proper english term for next posts, thanks!

  • Rich_in_Orlando

Posted October 08, 2007 - 12:08 PM

#7

I am not a good person to ask for advice on ready-made DS kits. Years ago I got a Baja Designs kit and it turned out to be junk. This is why I do it myself anymore. There are a lot more choices out there these days and I even hear good things from time to time about Baja Designs. Many people swear by Trick Dual Sport kits but I have no personal experience with them.

I have bought quite a few things over the years from baja designs like turn signals, connectors and other small electrical parts and have been happy with their products in that regard.

  • CAlmride

Posted October 10, 2007 - 04:55 PM

#8

I bought mine from ElectroSport. It's worked fine for me with no problems. All the componets are mounted in the headlight shell. It was easy to install, all though the stator mod took sometime.

Rich have you looked at the Trick DS site? They have a widget that connects your headlight to the battery when the bike isn't running and to the AC circuit when the bike is running. I don't know if that would help you out.

  • Rich_in_Orlando

Posted October 13, 2007 - 03:20 PM

#9

I bought mine from ElectroSport. It's worked fine for me with no problems. All the componets are mounted in the headlight shell. It was easy to install, all though the stator mod took sometime.

Rich have you looked at the Trick DS site? They have a widget that connects your headlight to the battery when the bike isn't running and to the AC circuit when the bike is running. I don't know if that would help you out.


I looked on their website but was unable to find anything like that. That would be a pretty easy solution. It does give me an idea to make something like that myself...:crazy:

  • CAlmride

Posted October 13, 2007 - 08:58 PM

#10

Its on their Home page, lower left called a "Smart Chip"
http://www.trickdual...Smart Chip.html

  • Tuckd

Posted October 29, 2007 - 09:18 AM

#11

I looked on their website but was unable to find anything like that. That would be a pretty easy solution. It does give me an idea to make something like that myself...:worthy:


Hey Rich, Nice to meet online. We met on Saturday when you tech'd (and failed my '06 WR450 due to loud pipe) at DDS Cheaha. (BTW, I think I am going to solve the pipe with GYTR insert on a stock '03-'05 YZ450F pipe by next ride.)

In reference to running DC headlights, I would be interested in your solution. I have the Trick DualSport kit and it works great while bike is running (high/low beam with dash indicator, turn signals w switch and indicator, brake light sensor) but it doesn't have DC headlight capability. I would be interested in hearing about your DIY solution.
Regards,
Dane




 
x

Join Our Community!

Even if you don't want to post, registered members get access to tools that make finding & following the good stuff easier.

If you enjoyed reading about "" here in the ThumperTalk archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join ThumperTalk today!

The views and opinions expressed on this page are strictly those of the author, and have not been reviewed or approved by ThumperTalk.