A beginners review of the WR450, second run at the trails.


26 replies to this topic
  • HollywoodMX

Posted September 27, 2007 - 02:25 PM

#1

This is a part 2 from my first thread were I was asking if it was possible to bascially go from 5 rides in a pit bike to a wr450 as my first real bike at 5' 8" 155lbs.

Original thread, From 140cc pit bike to 450f?? :
http://www.thumperta...ad.php?t=552517

Well my first time out on the trails I definately got owned. My second time out was definatelty a different story. The top heavyness does take getting used to and thats what I learned to control more on the second ride and gained some confidence with it as well. I did fairly well this time, dumped the bike less, got up and down hills better, better with the technical trails, and I can pick up the bike a lot easier this round too.

For the people say its too much power, its not the case if your not a total idot with the throttle.

I love this bike, the power actually saved me more times than I can remember. The simple fact is you point the bike to go up a hill and if you can hold on it WILL get you up the hill! I love that, you can be at some pretty slow speeds and the freeking thing just trucks up the hill with such little effort from the engine. It's actually quite rediculous the torque this bike makes.

In the end, its definatly possible to have a wr450 as ones first bike if the user is prepared to learn the hard way. A lighter bike like a KDX 200-220, cr230f, ttr230 may have been easier to learn on balance weight wise, but I would never trade that for the power I have to get up those hills at slow speeds when it gets hairier. The joke about go to the gym to make the bike feel lighter, rather than go too far stripping the bike is totally true an not be discarded. And take a thought if u really need a full tank of gas for the ride.

  • SJMC_DON

Posted September 27, 2007 - 06:43 PM

#2

And take a thought if u really need a full tank of gas for the ride.


You'll be doing 60 - 90 miles ride in no time and packing extra fuel just to get back:thumbsup:

  • JSanfilippo

Posted September 27, 2007 - 09:11 PM

#3

For the people say its too much power, its not the case if your not a total idot with the throttle.


That is becoming my biggest problem. Amplified by a fresh tire, better ground conditions, and better overall traction. :thumbsup:

  • erickdj

Posted September 27, 2007 - 09:19 PM

#4

That is becoming my biggest problem. Amplified by a fresh tire, better ground conditions, and better overall traction. :thumbsup:

Easy with the throttle Joe. :thumbsup: :thumbsup: :worthy: I think you may want to live long enough to enjoy that bike for years to come. j/k, ride it like it's your #1 b1tc#:ride: :bonk:

  • redswr

Posted September 27, 2007 - 09:38 PM

#5

That is becoming my biggest problem. Amplified by a fresh tire, better ground conditions, and better overall traction. :thumbsup:


your already on a new tire? you must ride alot more than me... i've got 600 miles so far and the tire looks pretty good still.

hollywood... i'm glad i got the 450 also... it is my second bike and i was considering the 250.

  • Mutu

Posted September 27, 2007 - 09:45 PM

#6

The missus preferred to ride my 450 to her 250 when she was learning.
Power or should I say torque is great for learners.

  • JSanfilippo

Posted September 28, 2007 - 12:07 AM

#7

your already on a new tire? you must ride alot more than me... i've got 600 miles so far and the tire looks pretty good still.

hollywood... i'm glad i got the 450 also... it is my second bike and i was considering the 250.


I got 430 miles on my first tire.

Bike has about 500 total miles

  • Mutu

Posted September 28, 2007 - 12:30 AM

#8

I got 430 miles on my first tire.

Bike has about 500 total miles

That's pretty good life out of the first tire! :thumbsup:

  • JSanfilippo

Posted September 28, 2007 - 12:34 AM

#9

That's pretty good life out of the first tire! :thumbsup:


It was so toasted. I've got it in the garage and its practically a slick. I'll see if I can get some pics tomorrow or saturday.

  • Mutu

Posted September 28, 2007 - 01:09 AM

#10

Yeah, I remember my first tire! I gave it a great death of smoke! :thumbsup:

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  • Charles De Mar

Posted September 28, 2007 - 07:03 AM

#11

This is a part 2 from my first thread were I was asking if it was possible to bascially go from 5 rides in a pit bike to a wr450 as my first real bike at 5' 8" 155lbs.

Original thread, From 140cc pit bike to 450f?? :
http://www.thumperta...ad.php?t=552517

Well my first time out on the trails I definately got owned. My second time out was definatelty a different story. The top heavyness does take getting used to and thats what I learned to control more on the second ride and gained some confidence with it as well. I did fairly well this time, dumped the bike less, got up and down hills better, better with the technical trails, and I can pick up the bike a lot easier this round too.

For the people say its too much power, its not the case if your not a total idot with the throttle.

I love this bike, the power actually saved me more times than I can remember. The simple fact is you point the bike to go up a hill and if you can hold on it WILL get you up the hill! I love that, you can be at some pretty slow speeds and the freeking thing just trucks up the hill with such little effort from the engine. It's actually quite rediculous the torque this bike makes.

In the end, its definatly possible to have a wr450 as ones first bike if the user is prepared to learn the hard way. A lighter bike like a KDX 200-220, cr230f, ttr230 may have been easier to learn on balance weight wise, but I would never trade that for the power I have to get up those hills at slow speeds when it gets hairier. The joke about go to the gym to make the bike feel lighter, rather than go too far stripping the bike is totally true an not be discarded. And take a thought if u really need a full tank of gas for the ride.


I'm 5'8" 155lbs as well, and I agree with what Hollywood has said. Awsome bike I love the power and I'm not wringing out a 250 to keep up. Plus when you ride gravel roads (W/plate) you can eat up YZF450, 450fR, and 250t's with that fith gear. bye bye! few miles down the road, and hey where did everybody go???

  • HollywoodMX

Posted September 28, 2007 - 12:10 PM

#12

I'm 5'8" 155lbs as well, and I agree with what Hollywood has said. Awsome bike I love the power and I'm not wringing out a 250 to keep up. Plus when you ride gravel roads (W/plate) you can eat up YZF450, 450fR, and 250t's with that fith gear. bye bye! few miles down the road, and hey where did everybody go???


Hahahaha ..."hey where did everybody go?"

The bike starts way easier in neutral when u have kick start it and estart it when cold. Plus I found only using half to 3 quaters of the hot start leaver range is best for estarting when hot.

  • Gandalf_WR450

Posted September 28, 2007 - 03:49 PM

#13

The bike starts way easier in neutral when u have kick start it and estart it when cold. Plus I found only using half to 3 quaters of the hot start leaver range is best for estarting when hot


I find that as well, mine sounds bad if I try to e-start it in anything but neutral, much less strain(not sure why) on the starter. I never would have thought about partial use of the cold start lever- I am going to have to try that! Thanks

  • TXOLDSCH

Posted September 28, 2007 - 07:05 PM

#14

I find that as well, mine sounds bad if I try to e-start it in anything but neutral, much less strain(not sure why) on the starter. I never would have thought about partial use of the cold start lever- I am going to have to try that! Thanks


That's because even though the bikes in neutral, you're still dragging all the clutch components and gear clusters inside.
Yeah, it's a strain on the starter.

  • Nostalgic

Posted September 29, 2007 - 06:00 AM

#15

My e-start won't function at all unless it's in neutral.

  • SPLATT

Posted September 29, 2007 - 09:52 AM

#16

My e-start won't function at all unless it's in neutral.


It should start in gear with the clutch lever pulled in.

Steve

  • Nostalgic

Posted September 29, 2007 - 11:03 AM

#17

It should start in gear with the clutch lever pulled in.

Steve


I wish it would but it doesn't even begin to turn over. It's like it's disengaged unless in neurtal regardless of the clutch lever being pulled in.

The guy I bought it from did the '04 starter upgrade (it's an '03).

Is this a problem??? The bike has run great all summer, bought it in spring.

  • TWILES

Posted September 29, 2007 - 12:14 PM

#18

I wish it would but it doesn't even begin to turn over. It's like it's disengaged unless in neurtal regardless of the clutch lever being pulled in.

The guy I bought it from did the '04 starter upgrade (it's an '03).

Is this a problem??? The bike has run great all summer, bought it in spring.


The "stopper" that goes into the clutch perch might have a problem. I completely did away with a couple for guys with YFZ's so they wouldn't have to have the lever pulled in for the starter to work. Chase the wires down and unplug it and see what happens. You might not be able to unplug it....I really don't remember how I did it on there's without looking it at but I did get them to start in gear with pulling in the clutch.

  • SPLATT

Posted September 29, 2007 - 01:53 PM

#19

Sounds like the override switch in the clutch perch is bad.What I did when I installed my Rekluse and removed the lever entirely was to cut the harness to the lever and join the two wires together.

Steve

  • SJMC_DON

Posted September 30, 2007 - 04:09 PM

#20

Sounds like the override switch in the clutch perch is bad.What I did when I installed my Rekluse and removed the lever entirely was to cut the harness to the lever and join the two wires together.

Steve


Good idea IF you have a rekluse but I have actually seen a bike and rider get thrust off a particularly tight piece of single track on a side hill. We were stopped watching others negotiate a switchback, he leaned forward and rested his forearm on the little grey button and they bike lurched enough to send them both rolling down the hill side :confused:

Without a rekluse, I would not jump out the clutch interlock switch :confused:




 
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