best oil


26 replies to this topic
  • char34

Posted September 14, 2007 - 10:36 AM

#1

Could one of you clever folks please tell me what the best oil is for a 2004 WR450, i.e. silkoline putoline. Is fully synthetic esther ok? I'm in the UK, so not all oil is available as in the states, cheers.

  • sidewinder2

Posted September 14, 2007 - 12:26 PM

#2

I use Motul 300V fully synthetic 10W40. If you do a search, you will find
many threads on this subject. :thumbsup:

  • dustinw

Posted September 14, 2007 - 12:33 PM

#3

oil = religion

buy oil, put in bike, change oil regularly

Leave it at that!

  • ccoates445

Posted September 14, 2007 - 01:00 PM

#4

esther based synthetics hold up better than anything else out there.

  • byggd

Posted September 14, 2007 - 01:21 PM

#5

Do a search. You will find days of reading material.

  • BajaFool

Posted September 14, 2007 - 02:09 PM

#6

Yamaha Motor Corp. paid an engineer a lot of money to ensure that Yamalube R for high performance 4 cycle engines worked to properly lubricate Yamaha engines in an offroad/competition/extreme environment when the oil is changed at the recommended mileage intervals. Why would you try to second guess the manufacturer's recommended oil? Yamahalube R, reasonably priced, recommended by the manufacturer and availabe at your neighborhood Yamaha dealer--- need I say more.

  • dustinw

Posted September 14, 2007 - 07:02 PM

#7

Yamaha Motor Corp. paid an engineer a lot of money to ensure that Yamalube R for high performance 4 cycle engines worked to properly lubricate Yamaha engines.....


You sure about that? Pretty big assumption really. I'm not saying there is anything wrong with Yamalube, but how much money do you really think Yamaha paid to research the oil? More than likely an Oil producer approached them and paid Yammie to relable thier oil.

  • clark4131

Posted September 14, 2007 - 07:52 PM

#8

Ah, yet another oil thread...the bain of any automotive message board...SC

  • JSanfilippo

Posted September 14, 2007 - 08:19 PM

#9

You sure about that? Pretty big assumption really. I'm not saying there is anything wrong with Yamalube, but how much money do you really think Yamaha paid to research the oil? More than likely an Oil producer approached them and paid Yammie to relable thier oil.


:thumbsup: :thumbsup:

  • BajaFool

Posted September 14, 2007 - 08:20 PM

#10

DustinW,
Interesting thought. Do you think that the oil company guy arrived at Yamaha for the contract negotiations aboard a black helicopter?

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  • Miotch

Posted September 16, 2007 - 10:33 AM

#11

actually, I work in automotive, and this is actually how it works. Do you know what GM pays for Mobile 1 in all their Vette's? Zero. Mobil gives them free oil as long as GM molds the Mobil 1 logo on the oil fill cap. this is not a guess, this is reality. I don't think yamaha is all that concerned about making sure our motor are perfectly lubed. if your engine lasts 20 years, how is yamaha going to expand sales???

  • clark4131

Posted September 16, 2007 - 06:37 PM

#12

Yamaha Motor Corp. paid an engineer a lot of money to ensure that Yamalube R for high performance 4 cycle engines worked to properly lubricate Yamaha engines in an offroad/competition/extreme environment when the oil is changed at the recommended mileage intervals. Why would you try to second guess the manufacturer's recommended oil? Yamahalube R, reasonably priced, recommended by the manufacturer and availabe at your neighborhood Yamaha dealer--- need I say more.

DustinW,
Interesting thought. Do you think that the oil company guy arrived at Yamaha for the contract negotiations aboard a black helicopter?


Baja, I think you been drinkin' too much of the Kool-Aid if you believe Yamaha went through that much trouble. For me, Amsoil is how I roll, even with a Rekluse on board...SC

  • BajaFool

Posted September 17, 2007 - 02:01 PM

#13

Actually, I used Yamalube for many years in both 2 cycle and 4 cycle motorcycles. I have a good friend who was one of the original partners in Maxima Lubricants. My deal with Maxima through my friend is too good to pass up, so I use their products and I have been very pleased. I've toured their facility and I've talked at great length with their chief blender and with the current owner as well. If I lost my Maxima deal, however; I would return to Yamalube in a heartbeat.

Yamalube has served me well in the past and I am sure that their products will provide the necessary lubrication that is required for my motorcycle, if I resume their use at some future date. And, while I won't dispute the comment that Miotch made about GM and Mobil1, I am sure that within the specification that GM developed (whether by contract or through the use of in-house engineers) for the Corvette motor, Mobil1 was probably one of several oils that met the specification and in addition Mobil1 offered the best deal to GM for oil. I refuse to believe that any manufacturer would agree to use a lubricant in their motor vehicles that did not meet a minimum performance specification, no matter how great the financial reward. A case in point. I have a 1999 Ford F250 Super Duty pickup. Any number of the major name manufacturers of transmission fluid will tell you with complete assurance that their transmission fluids fulfill a dual specification and are therefore labeled for use where EITHER Mercon or MerconV transmission fluid is specified. Ford tested these dual use fluids and rejected their use in the R100 transmissions installed in the Super Duty pickups. Now, if Ford wanted to make a buck, they could have just looked the other way and sold new transmissions to the owners of Ford pickups who used dual purpose transmission fluid. Instead they labeled the dip stick "Mercon only" and added an information page to the owner's manual stating that only Mercon transmission fluid should be used in these vehicles and the use of transmission fluids indicating dual Mercon/MerconV usage may result in transmission damage.

I love motor oil/ transmission fluid discussions!!!!! My next favorite discussion topic is who makes the best spark plugs. :thumbsup: Anybody know what the AC stands for in the AC Spark Plug brand name?

  • GCannon

Posted September 18, 2007 - 09:54 AM

#14

Yes! AC stands for Albert Champion.:thumbsup:
http://www.acdelcoca...s/history.shtml

I like and use the NGK Iridium Plug. I find that the bike starts easier which is very important to get even a slight advantage in this department when you are riding the "Venerable 426" :thumbsup:

You electric start weenies may not notice the difference and may want to save the money. I thought I read a test in an Automotive trade mag about how the iridium plugs worked better in high compression high cylinder pressure applications (which would be us) if i find the artical I will post it.:thumbsup:

How is this for a Hi Jack:bonk:

  • Mutu

Posted September 18, 2007 - 10:21 AM

#15

Could one of you clever folks please tell me what the best oil is for a 2004 WR450, i.e. silkoline putoline. Is fully synthetic esther ok? I'm in the UK, so not all oil is available as in the states, cheers.

Silkoline is one of the better oils around.
I run the silkoline pro4 now, switching over from motul 5100.
Fully synthetic is the best way to go!!! :thumbsup:

  • BajaFool

Posted September 18, 2007 - 11:40 AM

#16

GCannon,
Why to Go!!!!!! Your answer is correct. Although, a Champion Spark Plug salesman once told me that in his office, AC stands for "Almost Champions".

Mutu,
Yes, Silkolene products are excellent. But, don't be so confident that your choice of full synthetic motorcycle oil is the best choice. The reality is that any motorcycle oil that is formulated for wet clutches and meets or exceeds both proposed JASO-MA M/C specific 4T Specs and SAE Spec SG/CC are going to work just fine in your off-road motorcycle, whether they are formulated from full or semi-synthetic base oil. Remember, you should be changing your oil every few hundred miles. Yamaha says change your oil every 600 miles, I change my oil every 300 miles and there are those fanatics who change their oil after every race event or weekend trail ride. Again, returning to my discussion with the folks at Maxima. I asked them if it was their off-road motorcycle that was ridden in the desert (fast sand washes and crawling through axle deep sand dunes); ridden on nasty single-track trails (Mexico and Utah) and miles of 1st gear riding through all types of terrain while exploring for new trails, which of their products would they put in their motorcycle transmission--- the answer was Maxima 4 SYNBLEND 10W40, a semi-synthetic ester based blend lubricant. This seems to be equivilent to Silkolene's 4T Comp-4SX 10W40. Unless you have money to burn, that would be my choice of motorcycle transmission oil for a high performance off-road motorcycle within Silkolene's product line.

OK, GCannon, if you want to take another shot at highjacking the thread back to spark plugs have at it, I'm done with oil discussions.:thumbsup:

  • GCannon

Posted September 18, 2007 - 03:50 PM

#17

OK!

If you were the engineer in charge of designing an motorcycle engine which includes and engine oiling system.

Would you design it to the minimum required specification and then depend largely on engine oil quality to provide the required engine protection?:thumbsup:

In all forseeable conditions remember we have Frostbite riding his WR in the winter in Alaska and we have BOER riding his WR in the Arabian Desert.:thumbsup:

If I were the Oil System designer I would design it not to depend on oil quality since I have little control of that, similarly I have no control over riding conditions across the world.:thumbsup:

Besides I might loose my job if I had a significant amount of engine failures.:bonk:

Do you really think it makes that much difference which oil you use as long as it meets the requirments of the wet clutch? I tell you what I bet you that the transmission gears put a lot more stress (shear force) on the Oil than the motor does (as long as you don't overheat).:worthy:

So go buy a good brand of Motorcycle oil which is easily avalible to you. If you get it for a good price then good for you. Change you oil frequentlly mostlly to keep the engine clean and free of problem causing debris.

Now go ride like hell and then post pictures of the those awesome riding adventures you have been going on.:ride:

  • Beejay

Posted September 18, 2007 - 07:09 PM

#18

OK!

If you were the engineer in charge of designing an motorcycle engine which includes and engine oiling system.

Would you design it to the minimum required specification and then depend largely on engine oil quality to provide the required engine protection?:thumbsup:

In all forseeable conditions remember we have Frostbite riding his WR in the winter in Alaska and we have BOER riding his WR in the Arabian Desert.:worthy:

If I were the Oil System designer I would design it not to depend on oil quality since I have little control of that, similarly I have no control over riding conditions across the world.:thumbsup:

Besides I might loose my job if I had a significant amount of engine failures.:bonk:

Do you really think it makes that much difference which oil you use as long as it meets the requirments of the wet clutch? I tell you what I bet you that the transmission gears put a lot more stress (shear force) on the Oil than the motor does (as long as you don't overheat).:ride:

So go buy a good brand of Motorcycle oil which is easily avalible to you. If you get it for a good price then good for you. Change you oil frequentlly mostlly to keep the engine clean and free of problem causing debris.

Now go ride like hell and then post pictures of the those awesome riding adventures you have been going on.:bonk:


:thumbsup: Agree 100% with you here, although I use Maxima 4 synblend.

  • Mutu

Posted September 19, 2007 - 12:24 AM

#19

Do you really think it makes that much difference which oil you use as long as it meets the requirments of the wet clutch? I tell you what I bet you that the transmission gears put a lot more stress (shear force) on the Oil than the motor does (as long as you don't overheat).:thumbsup:

Don't fully synthetic oils provide better sheer strength and heat protection than dino and semi blends? :thumbsup:

That seems to be the common thought.

  • GCannon

Posted September 19, 2007 - 07:58 AM

#20

Don't fully synthetic oils provide better sheer strength and heat protection than dino and semi blends? :thumbsup:

That seems to be the common thought.


Yes as a rule. But many conventional oil and "Blends" perform just as well.
It all depends on the additive package. Friction modifiers like moly, molibdium disulfide (sorry for the spelling which are bad for the wet clutch) this is why Honda has different oil for the trans and engine since the systems have such different oil requirements. Thermal stabalizers and all kinds of great chemistry.

These additives raise the price of the oil. at what point do the blends become as expensive as the synthetics?:thumbsup:

You may get what you pay for:thumbsup:




 
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