what else do i need when replacing the base gasket?


9 replies to this topic
  • deputyperk

Posted September 07, 2007 - 10:12 AM

#1

i think this task maybe a bit much for me so i plan on taking the bike to a pro, either a shop or paying a tech on the side to do it, what should i expect to pay?

also what other gaskets or parts should i buy when buying the gasket to ensure a perfect no prob, no leak bike?

  • brianwheelies

Posted September 07, 2007 - 11:44 AM

#2

Not sure but I'm thinking of maybe doing mine too. Mine has been weeping after the really long rides. I wouldn't mind tossing the high comp piston in there while I'm at it. They include everything to do the job I think.

  • mxrob

Posted September 07, 2007 - 12:24 PM

#3

i think this task maybe a bit much for me so i plan on taking the bike to a pro, either a shop or paying a tech on the side to do it, what should i expect to pay?

also what other gaskets or parts should i buy when buying the gasket to ensure a perfect no prob, no leak bike?


Suzuki sells a top end gasket kit but I'm not sure if it includes the base gasket. I'd order this kit first to see what's in it. The only other things you'd need are piston pin clip(s) if you opted to leave the piston in the bore. If you are bringing it to a shop they will take care of getting all of the required gaskets and seals anyway. :thumbsup:

  • deputyperk

Posted September 07, 2007 - 11:39 PM

#4

how do you get a new base gasket on there without removing the cylinder from the piston? gasket is smaller than the cylinder in width right?

  • brianwheelies

Posted September 08, 2007 - 09:31 AM

#5

By exposing the piston pin and removing it. That's what Rob means by purchasing new piston pin clips.

  • mxrob

Posted September 08, 2007 - 09:32 AM

#6

how do you get a new base gasket on there without removing the cylinder from the piston? gasket is smaller than the cylinder in width right?


It was posted by another forum member awhile back. With the piston at TDC he lifted the cylinder up just far enough to access the piston pin. He removed the clips and pushed the piston pin out to remove the cylinder with the piston still in it and the rings still compressed. He then cleaned the cases and cylinder base, installed the new gasket and put the cylinder/piston back on the rod with new clips.

  • deputyperk

Posted September 08, 2007 - 11:51 AM

#7

you dont need to remove came or timing chains?

  • brianwheelies

Posted September 08, 2007 - 06:56 PM

#8

I haven't looked at the top end of the 650 yet. The timing chain will not need to be removed but when doing the job, you would be best served to wire it to the frame once you get it off the cam sprocket. You don't want to drop it in the case. The cam will have to come out as well. Taking it apart is easy though. Putting it back together takes the precision....getting the cam timing correct. If done incorrectly, you can tear up a motor! If the manual is followed to the T, you won't have problems.

  • mxrob

Posted September 08, 2007 - 08:19 PM

#9

you dont need to remove came or timing chains?


Well yes, you'll have to remove the cam sprocket and cam in order to remove the head and cylinder. I normally put a wire on the chain before yanking off the cylinder like Brian mentioned. No need to be to careful though. It isn't going to disappear into the abyss on you.... and it's pretty easy to tell if it's engaged on the crank or not once you start putting things back together. Certainly nothing to get your panties in a wad over... :ride: Just remain calm and things will flow back together nicely. :thumbsup:

  • deputyperk

Posted September 09, 2007 - 12:44 AM

#10

sweet deal, i am sure i could takle this but ill get a pro to do it locally




 
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