River Crossing gone bad


14 replies to this topic
  • alaskaayers

Posted August 15, 2007 - 09:18 AM

#1

Ok, so I dumped my 2003 WR450 in a creek here in Alaska. I can't seem to find any good information on exactly HOW bad this is for the bike (oil turned milky). Obviously I know this is not good for my ego or the bike, but I would like to know for myself how much damage I actually did by draining the cylinder and exhaust and riding out (we were 10 or so miles back). From what I can find on the oil manufacturer's websites, it isn't the water that ruins the engine per se (the water is supposed to evaporate off for the most part), but rather the rust that can be caused by water. I'll be changing the oil immediately, but does anyone know really how bad this is for the bike. I have anecdotal information from people that this kind of thing happens all the time. I just want to be informed.

  • xrmarty

Posted August 15, 2007 - 11:00 AM

#2

Just change the oil and flush the motor. Many people do different things to get the water out. Read this thread, it's got some good ideas.

http://www.thumperta...ad.php?t=540017

  • ETP

Posted August 15, 2007 - 11:16 AM

#3

Ok, so I dumped my 2003 WR450 in a creek here in Alaska. I can't seem to find any good information on exactly HOW bad this is for the bike (oil turned milky). Obviously I know this is not good for my ego or the bike, but I would like to know for myself how much damage I actually did by draining the cylinder and exhaust and riding out (we were 10 or so miles back). From what I can find on the oil manufacturer's websites, it isn't the water that ruins the engine per se (the water is supposed to evaporate off for the most part), but rather the rust that can be caused by water. I'll be changing the oil immediately, but does anyone know really how bad this is for the bike. I have anecdotal information from people that this kind of thing happens all the time. I just want to be informed.


I completely submerged my XR600 years ago and rode it 10 miles back to camp with milky oil. Then I changed the oil at camp, rode the rest of the weekend, then changed the oil again when I got home.
Didn't hurt the bike at all. Sold it years later when I got my WR...

  • byggd

Posted August 15, 2007 - 11:23 AM

#4

I hydro locked my 02 once with over 10 miles back to camp. Just do about 6-8 oil changes using either some cheap oil or ATF. You only need to use 1qt each time and run it for a min or two between changes. Once it looks clean do one final change changing the filter as well.

  • SJMC_DON

Posted August 15, 2007 - 12:11 PM

#5

I hydro locked my 02 once with over 10 miles back to camp. Just do about 6-8 oil changes using either some cheap oil or ATF. You only need to use 1qt each time and run it for a min or two between changes. Once it looks clean do one final change changing the filter as well.



Yes and no... I did the same thing but apparently the "cheap oil"
I bought had friction additives in it and my clutch fibers / plates had to be replaced :bonk:

I would do as byggd suggests above just make sure the oil you use meets or exceeds the spec in the manual :prof:

  • Gandalf_WR450

Posted August 15, 2007 - 12:58 PM

#6

That has always been one my fears- crossing water that is deeper than I thought and realizing if I lose it, I drown it.
I have hung it upside down about 5' up in a tree for about 20 minutes. I left it there because I didnt have a camera and went back to get my riding partner- had to let someone see it! I felt I might have filled the cylinder up with gas, so I slowly kicked it over a few times before I started so I wouldnt blow the head gasket, or worse. Id like to hear how many times you flush before all looks clean.

  • alaskaayers

Posted August 15, 2007 - 04:21 PM

#7

I'll let you know. We rode the Boulder Creek trail on Monday. It was absolutely gorgeous. Like the picture Homer has of Alaska from the Simpson's movie...

The trail was awesome as well. Lots of hill climbs and nice trail.

Visit the ThumperTalk Store for the lowest prices on motorcycle / ATV parts and accessories - Guaranteed
  • byggd

Posted August 15, 2007 - 05:08 PM

#8

Yes and no... I did the same thing but apparently the "cheap oil"
I bought had friction additives in it and my clutch fibers / plates had to be replaced :bonk:

I would do as byggd suggests above just make sure the oil you use meets or exceeds the spec in the manual :prof:


Are you talking about friction reducers? If so you are absolutely right, that’s something I should have mentioned. I did use oil without friction reducers because with a wet clutch those oils you never want to run.

  • NavyNuke

Posted August 15, 2007 - 07:50 PM

#9

i drowned my 06 in about 8 feet of water.

here's the video of it
http://media.putfile.com/swimtime

got it running on the trail, bought 1 gallon of diesel just to pour through the frame to flush it, and pour through engine.

put drain bolt in, fill with diesel, pull drain bolt, repeat. diesel is cheap, and picks up the mosture, then 3 or 4 more quick oil changes, and then half the normal interval for a couple oil changes, and all was good.

  • dmoney1074

Posted August 15, 2007 - 08:26 PM

#10

i drowned my 06 in about 8 feet of water.

here's the video of it
http://media.putfile.com/swimtime

got it running on the trail, bought 1 gallon of diesel just to pour through the frame to flush it, and pour through engine.

put drain bolt in, fill with diesel, pull drain bolt, repeat. diesel is cheap, and picks up the mosture, then 3 or 4 more quick oil changes, and then half the normal interval for a couple oil changes, and all was good.


Wow that was funny..... :thumbsup:

  • Brooks_Wackerman

Posted August 15, 2007 - 11:20 PM

#11

If the water was clean you should be right after a few oil changes

  • 450high

Posted August 16, 2007 - 05:26 AM

#12

Worked as a outboard motor tech for years.Drowning motors is no big deal and shouldn't affect the life of motor if dealt with quickly and properly.1- you need to get the majority of water out a.s.a.p. 2 - remove plug and air filter then tip upside down and crank to get the water out of bore.Ring out air filter then re-install both.3- if you have fresh oil change it if not change a.s.a.p ,you can ride out if you have to.4 - THE IMPORTANT PART get the sucker running no matter what this is the most important part.5- if it wont start repeat the first 3 steps.6- Once started ride ride ride as this will evaperate the water out with heat and it's the best way to do it.7- finally change the oil and ride for 15 mins then drain oil , refill and repeat as many times as needed until the oil is no longer needed.THATS ALL YOU NEED TO DO. If you drown the motor turn off a.s.a.p as if it get water in the cylinder when running it will hydrylic the piston and can bend conrods and do major damage.

  • alaskaayers

Posted August 17, 2007 - 11:18 AM

#13

It took 5 oil changes to get a clean drain. I used Walmart 20W50, ran it for a couple minutes to heat it up and drained it. I am pretty sure that oil has the same specs as the Yamalube, but just to be safe I run Yamalube since it only takes 1 quart and isn't worth the risk for $3-$4.

  • AkRider

Posted August 17, 2007 - 10:10 PM

#14

Which creek? Both me and my friend have dumped our bikes in creeks up here. You'll be fine if it's normal after a few changes.

  • 450high

Posted August 20, 2007 - 01:44 AM

#15

Should be right if your oil is no longer milky.




 
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