chain cleaning


36 replies to this topic
  • Tireguy63

Posted July 24, 2007 - 08:02 AM

#1

It seems that the O-ring chain seems to rust easily, even when I lubricate it. Maybe some water happens to drip on it when I wash the bike. Any suggestions on how to prevent rusting? It is difficult to keep water off of the chain when I am washng it.

Thanks guys.

  • 06crf_er

Posted July 24, 2007 - 08:31 AM

#2

What are you using for lube? You should try spraying it down with WD-40 after the wash to disperse any water. Then wipe and apply your normal chain lubricant. You shouldn't have rusting issues if it's lubed properly.:prof:

  • Mutu

Posted July 24, 2007 - 09:12 AM

#3

wd-40 will penetrate the seals and break down the grease inside the chain.
Your chain will last a lot longer if you didn't use wd-40 on it.

  • 06crf_er

Posted July 24, 2007 - 09:24 AM

#4

wd-40 will penetrate the seals and break down the grease inside the chain.
Your chain will last a lot longer if you didn't use wd-40 on it.


A good point, I didn't see he was using an O-ring...this could be a potential problem. Nevertheless, if dried and lubed properly, it shouldn't rust.

Try taking it off when you wash, hanging it to dry, then applying the lube right after it's dried. This will shorten the time it's hanging without lube allowing oxidation to commence. Good luck man:thumbsup:

  • Mutu

Posted July 24, 2007 - 01:00 PM

#5

Agreed :ride:

  • Beejay

Posted July 24, 2007 - 04:05 PM

#6

WD40 does not damage the 'o' rings, but if you're concerned then use kero to wash your chain.
My chains wear out long before any 'o' rings are damaged, even if you use gas it still takes a long time before it deteriorates the 'o' rings.

  • ccoates445

Posted July 24, 2007 - 04:42 PM

#7

Chain Wax gives me the best results. It's recommended by many of the chain manufacturers and I have found that you get the least amount of fly-off and the build-up is without a doubt the least. I clean with Simple Green and a Grunge-Brush. Rinse with regular tap pressure and dry with compressed air being careful not to get too close to the chain with the air nozzle (8-10") and then lube.

Side note: WD40, Kero and the like don't necessarily damage o-rings. The lite petrol products will get past the o-rings and thin out the lube inside. They also carry abrasives past the o-rings which speeds the deterioration of everything.

  • CaseyWR450

Posted July 24, 2007 - 04:52 PM

#8

I use Primary drive chain lube and its working great for me no rust at all.

  • Mutu

Posted July 24, 2007 - 10:48 PM

#9

WD40 does not damage the 'o' rings, but if you're concerned then use kero to wash your chain.
My chains wear out long before any 'o' rings are damaged, even if you use gas it still takes a long time before it deteriorates the 'o' rings.

Agreed it does not damage them, as I said previously, WD-40 just penetrates them and melts away the grease. :prof:

  • farkawi

Posted July 27, 2007 - 05:16 AM

#10

WD 40 may indeed get into the rollers past the o-rings and dissolve the grease within....but I still use it to remove the water after washing. I use no chain lube at all on my o-ring chain. 1400 miles now and it is finally wearing out. My opinion is that the heavy chain lubes attract too much dirt and form a great grinding paste that causes excessive wear. Just my take on the whole deal. For the chains that I do lube; I prefer the Honda stuff in the red can. It is very light and attracts less dirt than heavy lubes. JMHO

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  • ccoates445

Posted July 27, 2007 - 08:23 AM

#11

WD 40 may indeed get into the rollers past the o-rings and dissolve the grease within....but I still use it to remove the water after washing. I use no chain lube at all on my o-ring chain. 1400 miles now and it is finally wearing out. My opinion is that the heavy chain lubes attract too much dirt and form a great grinding paste that causes excessive wear. Just my take on the whole deal. For the chains that I do lube; I prefer the Honda stuff in the red can. It is very light and attracts less dirt than heavy lubes. JMHO

Try chain wax. It sets up completely dry and protects like nothing else on the market. Great point on the other lubes. They are sticky. Chain Wax does not dry sticky. Great stuff.

  • cetris

Posted July 27, 2007 - 11:14 AM

#12

I do the same thing with the chain on my DRZ400, WD-40 only. I have 2300 miles on the original chain (70% offroad) and it still looks great. I understand the theory of it washing the lube out of the sealed links, but I just have not experienced it. I sold my last street bike with 10,000 miles on it and the original chain which I mainly did the same thing with, and the chain still looked good. Maybe I have just been lucky, but I don't think so.


WD 40 may indeed get into the rollers past the o-rings and dissolve the grease within....but I still use it to remove the water after washing. I use no chain lube at all on my o-ring chain. 1400 miles now and it is finally wearing out. My opinion is that the heavy chain lubes attract too much dirt and form a great grinding paste that causes excessive wear. Just my take on the whole deal. For the chains that I do lube; I prefer the Honda stuff in the red can. It is very light and attracts less dirt than heavy lubes. JMHO



  • Fullbore4

Posted July 27, 2007 - 03:14 PM

#13

WD 40 may indeed get into the rollers past the o-rings and dissolve the grease within....but I still use it to remove the water after washing. I use no chain lube at all on my o-ring chain. 1400 miles now and it is finally wearing out. My opinion is that the heavy chain lubes attract too much dirt and form a great grinding paste that causes excessive wear. Just my take on the whole deal. For the chains that I do lube; I prefer the Honda stuff in the red can. It is very light and attracts less dirt than heavy lubes. JMHO


Wow.......only 1400 miles and your chain is wearing out........I think I'll stay away from WD40.

  • 04WR450F

Posted July 27, 2007 - 07:53 PM

#14

After we wash our bikes, we take 'em for a rip up and down the street (we're in a rural area) to dry the chains and get the water out of places that the chamois can't get to . We don't lube our O-ring chains either. There are two schools of thought on this-lube or don't lube. Who knows?

  • TeXR

Posted August 01, 2007 - 09:30 PM

#15

Right after you wash your bike always run it up and down the street. You displace the water off your chain and heat up the brakes to keep them from rusting. I've used WD on my Oring chains for 20 years and my chains have always had a long life span...always clean...no rust...no breakdown of orings. Use it and nothing else! Maybe some 30wt motoroil bead down the center with an oil can but nothing else. Don't use any garbage "chain lube" unless you want to collect all the crap in the world and spend extra time keep your chain clean!

  • ccoates445

Posted August 01, 2007 - 11:29 PM

#16

As a chain lubricant, WD or any other penetrating lubricant will do what it says. Penetrate. Not good on o-ring chains. Granted it is always a good idea to give your bike a rip right after douching it off. Chain lubes are much better for the protecting the chain and sprockets than any other petroleum product but they do require more chain cleanings (almost every ride) which doesn't sit right with anyone. That is why so many use no lube at all, but that provides no rust protection, as well as less life to the sprockets. Parafin based "waxes" go on wet, the flow agent (non-aggressive solvent) dries and leaves the product behind to protect the chain and sprockets. Because the product is dry, there is nothing for the dirt to stick to. O-ring chains need no lubricant, but the sprockets do. Chains just need protection from the elements. Protection that doesn't wear off. So what to do. Do what works for you. But if you use standard chain lubes, use them sparingly. And thats not easy to do because it's so thick it's hard to get complete coverage with a quick pass over the chain. TeXR is right that chain lubes will "collect all the crap in the world" but only if they are sticky (petroleum based) and if you use too much of them. They still protect well but here comes the frequent cleanings. Dry protection keeps build-up away and protects the chain and sprockets.

Has anyone else used the "wax" products? I'd like to see some feedback.

Cheers, C

  • Mutu

Posted August 01, 2007 - 11:55 PM

#17

Im a wax man.

I found in my experience that id doesn't collect as much crap as the other tacky chain lubes. It still collects stuff, but not much.

I have read that silicone spray works just as good as the wax.

  • GCannon

Posted August 02, 2007 - 08:26 AM

#18

Chain Lubes are like Women! Everybody likes something different!:p :excuseme:

Bottom line Clean your chain get the dirt off the chain. Then put something on it to Protect,Dry,Lubricate.

The one common thing you find on "the Chain Lube Thread"
Is that the people having success have a system they clean their chain and they put something on it.

You to will need to finde a system that works for you:thumbsup:

  • ds_freak

Posted August 02, 2007 - 08:52 AM

#19

I put my bike up on the stand after a long ride. Start it up and put it in first gear. Leaving the clutch in, the tire will still spin a little. Then, I use the grunge brush on the chain while it is in motion and spray it w/ WD-40.

:ride:

  • waynus

Posted August 02, 2007 - 11:36 AM

#20

I spray my chain with a degreaser if it needs it and hose it off.

I then hit it with WD40 or CRC to displace the water.

Sorry to disagree Mutu, :p but I actually like the idea that it penetrates past the O rings to lubricate them and if it dilutes the grease, then we have a nice runny grease in there to do it's thing.

Chain waxes and the like contain tackifiers which have no lubricating properties. In other words, a gearbox oil will lube better but wont stay on as well.

If I am going on a wet ride, I will hit the chain with something substantial (cos I know there wont be dust) and hopefully it will remain within the rollers (which aren't sealed by the O rings!!!) and stop them from wearing from the inside out. Something like a lithium based grease in a spray can.:thumbsup:




 
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