Arc method of checking chain condition


16 replies to this topic
  • Huffa 2

Posted July 22, 2007 - 06:46 AM

#1

5000 miles on chain.

I just recently went on a 300 mile ride and didn't lose adjustment on my stock L chain at all. The trip was actually 500 but due to another problem I reajusted it up at XLR Daves house in NY, from his house on it was about 300.

With it properly adjusted you can not pull the links away from rear sprocket at all and am wondering what the rule of thumb is concerning how much of a arc till chain is no good.

I have approx 15" at the middle.

I did order a new one but am I wasting a lot of life left in this one yet or would this be considered shot ?

I can't recall what is acceptable using this method anymore :excuseme:

Posted Image

  • cleonard

Posted July 22, 2007 - 08:42 AM

#2

In my experience ringed chains wear in a completely different manner than standard chains. One note here though. I live in SoCal so I don't see a lot of mud. Your experience may be different since you do see mud.

Standard chains wear constantly and more or less evenly. O-ring/X-ring chains do not. As long as the an individual links rings are in good shape it does not wear much at all. When a ring fails some dirt/water/mud gets in there and starts wearing that link. The wear gets concentrated in those links.

For me a O-ring or X-ring chain needs a little adjustment when it is new. Say the first few hundred miles. After that there is a long service life where not much adjustment is needed. At the end of the life it will start needing more frequent adjustment. When that happens I take a real close look at each link. Almost always I find a few liinks where the rings have failed and a lot of wear has happened. As soon as I see this it is new chain time. In many years of riding I have never had a chain failure.

I'd say that your chain is still in good shape. I don't think that the "arc" method is really any good. I ran chains for years after that method said that they were bad. It may have been a good method back in the 70's when chains were crap.

What do your sprockets look like? Normally the sprockets reflect the wear on the chain.

  • Huffa 2

Posted July 22, 2007 - 09:06 AM

#3

Thanks for your info, will take that into consideration.

You asked how my sprockets were, the stock rear one was fine but I have a brand new one on now cause I geared it up.

:lol: The front one is or rather was a different story though, just to remind you .........

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  • HawkGT

Posted July 22, 2007 - 09:45 AM

#4

I've never heard of the arc method. What is it?

  • Huffa 2

Posted July 22, 2007 - 10:45 AM

#5

I've never heard of the arc method. What is it?


I guess you can see the pic in 1st post ?

Well it just means over a certain given amount of arc, the chain is considered shot but I don't recall how much it was.

I never really used that method much anyway, but my step bro would always ask "How much arc did it have?" UMMM, I don't know, was always my reply.

Just was curious if anyone else did this method.

  • Rockjockey

Posted July 22, 2007 - 11:23 AM

#6

I have never heard of the "arc" method either. Does that measure the amount of stretch or ?
It would seem to me that the more links you have the more "arc" you would observe.

  • Huffa 2

Posted July 22, 2007 - 11:29 AM

#7

I have never heard of the "arc" method either. Does that measure the amount of stretch or ?
It would seem to me that the more links you have the more "arc" you would observe.


Maybe it's all bull :lol: but I always thought the more play you get in each link the more it will arc ?

Once I get my new one, I'll compare. If my theory holds true, the new one should arc less for sure.

  • HawkGT

Posted July 22, 2007 - 04:19 PM

#8

Ok, now I think I get it. That chain is laying with side plates perpendicular to the ground. At first I didn't notice that and thought does that tell you. :banghead:

I could see "arc" increasing with chain wear. However, I've always thought the proper way to quantify chain wear was to measure the distance between a certain number of links. I believe all my Honda manuals specify drive chains' service limits in this manner.

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  • Huffa 2

Posted July 22, 2007 - 04:45 PM

#9

Ok, now I think I get it. That chain is laying with side plates perpendicular to the ground. At first I didn't notice that and thought does that tell you. :banghead:

I could see "arc" increasing with chain wear. However, I've always thought the proper way to quantify chain wear was to measure the distance between a certain number of links. I believe all my Honda manuals specify drive chains' service limits in this manner.


:lol: I should have mentioned that they are laying that way.

Normally my pic's are really clear but my wife :foul: screwed with the camera and now I have to figue out how to get the nice shots back again.

I never read that, will have to check it out. Thank You :thumbsup:

(of course I probably will never measure them anyway:busted: )

  • XR680RR

Posted July 22, 2007 - 07:09 PM

#10

Sprocket and chain wear together, should be all changed at the same time. This doesn't work well for me because of three different rear wheel setups I run. 46 tooth on the sand paddle wheel setup, 48 for the dirt setup and 47 for the street, all with 15 counter shaft sprocket. I was running 47 for desert, 49 for tight trial use but, I like the 15/48 better and use it for everything now. I have ran the 13,14,15 counter also, so in the end it is hard to keep what is wearing with what.

  • Denn10

Posted July 23, 2007 - 06:07 AM

#11

Sprocket and chain wear together, should be all changed at the same time. This doesn't work well for me because of three different rear wheel setups I run. 46 tooth on the sand paddle wheel setup, 48 for the dirt setup and 47 for the street, all with 15 counter shaft sprocket. I was running 47 for desert, 49 for tight trial use but, I like the 15/48 better and use it for everything now. I have ran the 13,14,15 counter also, so in the end it is hard to keep what is wearing with what.


That is a good point, if your gonna just change your chain you might just wait till your sprockets are starting to go and get a whole setup together as you may cause the chain to wear a bit faster with old sprockets. I wait till my sprockets are bad and get a whole new setup. If you not doing all offroad you will see that these will last quite a while. I have checked my chains with your arc method but not an oring chain only with my non orings of my MX bikes.

  • XR650L_Dave

Posted July 23, 2007 - 07:53 AM

#12

I don't know where you'd call the limit, but I think arcing the chain does indeed give you a good idea of wear.

15 inches, 110 links (ignoring the few you cut off), the ques. is what is the arc for a new chain?

I go through the chain and look for 'tight' links (failed O-ring), and I grab the chain just behind and ahead of a link and I do the arc test back and forth on just that link- that shows wear well, but again, how much is too much?

What seems to work well as an indicator is to pull the chain away from the rear sprocket, at the rear part of the sprocket. If you can see more than 1/2 the tooth, its worn.

Dave

  • Huffa 2

Posted July 23, 2007 - 09:24 AM

#13

Yea Dave, hear what your saying and I did just that, pulled it away, well I couldn't pull it away from sprocket at all so I would think it's still good yet.

Like I said, I'll compare the arc to the new one I get and go from there.

I don't know if I agree that the sprockets should always be changed at the same time, maybe the front but sometimes the back one will last the life of two chains , I think? :excuseme:

  • Denn10

Posted July 23, 2007 - 09:31 AM

#14

Ive layed down a new and old chain to see the difference i guess you just have to see a new one and old to see the big difference in them. I wait till the rear is wearing and just change it out then, i guess its a preference thing as some may not have the funds$$$ to do it all at once. Ive never had a chain break or come off so it all works out in the end. My bike has 11k on it and im not sure if its all stock chain/sprockets but there in good shape so hopefully thell last a long time. HUFFA you sure seem to be doing alot to that bike since youve got it LOL whats still the same? just the frame and motor only LOL

  • martinfan30

Posted July 23, 2007 - 09:33 AM

#15

welcome back Denn!:thumbsup:

  • Huffa 2

Posted July 23, 2007 - 09:52 AM

#16

Ive layed down a new and old chain to see the difference i guess you just have to see a new one and old to see the big difference in them. I wait till the rear is wearing and just change it out then, i guess its a preference thing as some may not have the funds$$$ to do it all at once. Ive never had a chain break or come off so it all works out in the end. My bike has 11k on it and im not sure if its all stock chain/sprockets but there in good shape so hopefully thell last a long time. HUFFA you sure seem to be doing alot to that bike since youve got it LOL whats still the same? just the frame and motor only LOL


It will most likely be a 1-2 year process of personalizing it and more then likely I'll never be done ! I'm the type guy that likes a lot of bling (my bike/your bike) and am always thinking "Well that would be cool, that's neat, that would work great, that would be a lot better and sometimes :rant: this part sucks! :busted:

Next on the agenda is these so very cool Moose foot pegs :thumbsup:

The polished sides and teeth are AWSOME man:jawdrop: NO WAY stock will do :thumbsdn:

I ordered them and wrote "NOT NOT for a CRF or CR these are for :blah: :blah: :blah: ........and what do they send me, :banghead: CR footpegs:rant:

Good deal for 70 bucks though, didn't get them from here but they have the largest pic.

http://www.amotostuf..._code=1620-0108

Yoe Denn If your bike does have the stock chain, it should NOT have a master link then.

I can't recall ever having a bike with out a master link and was spinning the chain around and around and around looking for one! :lol:

  • martinfan30

Posted July 23, 2007 - 10:12 AM

#17

It will most likely be a 1-2 year process of personalizing it and more then likely I'll never be done ! I'm the type guy that likes a lot of bling (my bike/your bike) and am always thinking "Well that would be cool, that's neat, that would work great, that would be a lot better and sometimes :rant: this part sucks! :busted:

Next on the agenda is these so very cool Moose foot pegs :thumbsup:

The polished sides and teeth are AWSOME man:jawdrop: NO WAY stock will do :thumbsdn:

I ordered them and wrote "NOT NOT for a CRF or CR these are for :blah: :blah: :blah: ........and what do they send me, :banghead: CR footpegs:rant:

Good deal for 70 bucks though, didn't get them from here but they have the largest pic.

http://www.amotostuf..._code=1620-0108

Yoe Denn If your bike does have the stock chain, it should NOT have a master link then.

I can't recall ever having a bike with out a master link and was spinning the chain around and around and around looking for one! :lol:


ya thought i was crazy too! no m.link! my dad did same thing!:crazy:





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