2007 yz450f turning issues


34 replies to this topic
  • allen2569

Posted July 21, 2007 - 04:27 PM

#1

Hi everyone, In stock form I hated the way the bike would turn.:mad: I played with the rebound and raised the forks 10mm. This helps but I wonder what anyone else tried. Any other tips? Thanks!:ride:

  • grayracer513

Posted July 21, 2007 - 04:47 PM

#2

Just curious, what did you ride before? How much do you weigh? How tall are you?

  • vpmx

Posted July 21, 2007 - 06:18 PM

#3

I had a problem with my 2007 as well. This might not work for everyone - set up is so personal. I set my rear sag at 100mm, pulled my bars back a little, raised the forks 14mm, soften the forks compression slightly for initial travel, use Applied's 24mm off-set clamps and install my trusty Dunlop 756RR (like glue) tires.

It took some time, but now it is really good. I can cut inside and hold a line without that wash feeling.

  • meyermetal

Posted July 21, 2007 - 06:26 PM

#4

I just sold my 06 YZ450, one of the reasons was because of the handling.

I did everything but change the tri-clamps even set the sag at 85 to increase the rake. The bike just won't turn without pushing the front end but it is stable.

Picked up a 07 YZ250 and it made a world of difference. Maybe the key is to spen $500 on new triple clamps.

  • 02YZ426

Posted July 21, 2007 - 07:55 PM

#5

I wasn't super happy with the corning of my 06 even with the forks raised. Seems like the 07 is much better. I'm liking the 07 and wouldn't give it up for any other bike... the thing is one solid package. Offset clamps may help it even more, but they are pricey and not sure if the performance gain would be worth it? :excuseme:

  • Polar_Bus

Posted July 22, 2007 - 05:07 AM

#6

I wasn't super happy with the corning of my 06 even with the forks raised. Seems like the 07 is much better. I'm liking the 07 and wouldn't give it up for any other bike... the thing is one solid package. Offset clamps may help it even more, but they are pricey and not sure if the performance gain would be worth it? :excuseme:


The 07 has a slightly longer shock, which was supposed to help cornering. I just added Millville front tire in place of the vague feeling stock Dunlap 739, and that worked for me awesome...

  • allen2569

Posted July 22, 2007 - 09:19 AM

#7

Which millville tire is that?

  • vpmx

Posted July 22, 2007 - 09:39 AM

#8

Which millville tire is that?


Kenda makes that tire. You can check it out here: http://www.kendausa....orcycle/mx.html

  • grayracer513

Posted July 22, 2007 - 10:51 AM

#9

I am 6'3, 212 lbs. Before this bike I had a 2003 yz 250. Love the four stroke power but must say I miss the flickablility of the 2 smoke!

OK, here's what I think.

First, if you haven't gotten rid of the stock 739 front, and you ride anything other than real hard pack, you'll be disappointed. Replace it with a 745 for hard to mid-soft, or a 742FA for mid-hard to soft. The Pirelli Scorpion Pro is also popular, as are some others. The 739 is widely despised.

Second, as much as it gets said that the new YZ feels as light as a two-stroke, it won't to someone that just got off one. 4-strokes are fundamentally different in how they steer, and even though I really like the way the new YZ450's handle when set up correctly, they are different than a two-stroke, so some adjustment needs to be made on your part.

To those of us who have spent a lot of time with modern 4-strokes, and the older YZF's in particular, the newer YZ450's are great.

In your particular case, you're a big guy. Tall, for one thing, and tall guys tend to be a little cramped on the new bikes. This will have you tending to sit rearward on the bike, which is the wrong way to ride it; you've got to get forward entering the turns.

The next thing is your weight. At 6'3" and 215, your hardly qualified as fat, but you are heavier than the bike was actually sprung for (170-185), and with your height pushing you back on the bike, you have too much rear sag and not enough front end dive, thus, the push.

Here's what I would do. Replace the stock bars with a set of Windham bends from Pro Taper, or something similar. That will raise the grips and give your arms a far better angle on them. If you can, get a top clamp at least that lets you move the bars forward some.

Get a tall seat, not so much for the height as for the fact that it flattens the seating area and makes it easier to scoot up.

Get the right springs for your weight. You may find that this improves the suspension so much that you don't need to consider any further suspension work at all. Set the rear sag at 95mm, and raise the forks 5-10mm.

I think that you'll see a big improvement. For perspective, you might want to take a ride on a CRF, or an older than '06 YZ450, just to see what we're saying. Then it's just a matter of adapting to a little different riding style.

Good Luck, :cheers:

  • bigred455

Posted July 22, 2007 - 01:09 PM

#10

Good tip on getting rid of the stock front and get a dunlop 756 or equilvalent tire. Then do your testing,I also believe the recommended race sag at 95mm is way off. Sure with less race sag a bike should turn better,but I have found out with the 07 running it at 95mm, the rear traction sucks coming out of corners, also tracking straight through the rough is suffered.108mm of race sag is what I run on my 07,I also ran it on my RMZ450,the 4 strokes like more race sag than usual,regardless of what the mags and manuals say.

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  • Climber

Posted July 22, 2007 - 02:46 PM

#11

I did most of the things that Grayracer metioned, except for the seat (I'm 6' tall). Tweaked and tuned the suspension (2006 yz450). They all helped. But, I finally got the suspension done and it helped more than all the other things, combined. The bike pushes, still. But that is how they are. However It is easily handled now. I like to push the bike with the front pushing, alot. If there is not a roost off the front tire, your not trying hard enough. With the new revalve, it is very predictable (now) and allows me to push it harder without washing out. It does not like to climb out of the ruts like it did.

Also, where your body is on this bike is critical to how well you can make it turn. If your on the wrong side of the seat when you start the turn, or you are not laying it over soon enough, you might as well stop. Try loading the front with a little front brake, going into the turn, let off the brake and push down on the bars, and oversteer it until it pushes, all the while easing onto the throttle. Try not to use the back brake so much and try not to blip the throttle on and off through the turn. The more power the better they steer...within reason.

  • grayracer513

Posted July 22, 2007 - 03:14 PM

#12

I also believe the recommended race sag at 95mm is way off. Sure with less race sag a bike should turn better,but I have found out with the 07 running it at 95mm, the rear traction sucks coming out of corners, also tracking straight through the rough is suffered.108mm of race sag is what I run on my 07,I also ran it on my RMZ450,the 4 strokes like more race sag than usual,regardless of what the mags and manuals say.

The manual doesn't specify this, and for a long time, the only magazine recommending reducing the sag on the '06 was MXA, so it's not as if everyone hopped on the first bandwagon that went by. (MXA, in fact, is one of the very few magazine test crews that bother to make any attempt to adjust out the undesirable tendencies of the bikes they test the way a real-world owner might)

The RMZ has a steeper head angle than the YZF, and that's one of the reasons it turns in better. Reducing the rear sag by going to 95 from the standard 100-105 is one way to steepen the head angle. It's easily reversible if you think you'd like to try another setting, so there's little point in debating it, but for most of the guys that have taken that approach, 95-97 has been what they liked best.

Also, Climbers tips on riding style are pretty good ones. Once it's set up, and your tires are working, you'll find the YZF is a delightfully neutral chassis; you can push the front, swing the tail out, or drift both ends at once. It has no mind of its own; it will do whatever you want. But it is different than riding a pinger, no doubt.

  • bigred455

Posted July 22, 2007 - 03:36 PM

#13

The manual does specify 95mm-100 race sag,page 7-16 07 service manual.No biggy,everyone has thier preference,just trying to state that more race sag is needed then what everyone thinks.

  • grayracer513

Posted July 22, 2007 - 03:59 PM

#14

The manual does specify 95mm-100 race sag,page 7-16 07 service manual.No biggy,everyone has thier preference,just trying to state that more race sag is needed then what everyone thinks.

It's worth noting that the rear shock used on the '07 is longer, which, by the time you factor in the lengths of the swing arm, etc., results in the bike being higher in the rear than an '06 at any given sag setting, too. Another example of how Yamaha adopted virtually every "field fix" recommended by Doug Dubach and MXA.

I won't disagree that you like 108 better on your bike, because, after all, I don't know you or your bike, or your riding style. But I will disagree with the general statement that 4-strokes need more sag. The balance and power characteristics of a thumper puts more emphasis on steering with the front wheel, particularly at the start of the turn, and the shallow head angles necessary for stability over rough ground that are common to MX bikes are not conducive to reducing understeer at turn in (push). Increasing sag makes the head angle shallower yet, and so runs counter to what's needed, in most cases.

But as you say, to each his own.

  • jeffboyd47m

Posted July 22, 2007 - 04:21 PM

#15

I am a taller and heavier rider @ 6-4 and 220lbs. Once I had my suspension set up for my size by "Enzo" and set my sag to 105mm as per their recommendation, my 07 handles and turns quite well. One thing that I have noticed is that the bike likes to be ridden aggressively and responds well at speed. The only time that I feel the front push is when I am not paying attention to my body position.

  • NM_KDX200

Posted July 22, 2007 - 05:25 PM

#16

EDIT: moved question to MX Technique...

  • meyermetal

Posted July 22, 2007 - 05:35 PM

#17

All this talk about adjusting the 06 YZF450 to turn is academic at best.

I’ve rode Hondas for years then a couple Suzukis and my old 06 YZF was my first Yami no green but rode quite a few KTMs. I bought it mainly for the engine but soon found I could not come to terms with the turning. Yes I changed the front tire (4 different ones) and the suspension but the chassis just likes to run flat out and stable over quick turning and twitchy. Yamahas have always been like this to some extent just like Suzukis always turn like they are on rails.

Bottom line I will always buy a bike for its handling traits for now on. It’s easier to build a rocket of an engine than to reengineer the chassis.

Just my .02 :prof:

  • Polar_Bus

Posted July 23, 2007 - 01:52 AM

#18

One other option that seems to work for me is tinkering with the fork rebound. Weight transfer is a big factor in cornering, and it seems most of us agree YZ's tend to wash rather than tuck under cornering. If your rebound is too firm it tends to not allow needed weight transfer to the front end entering a corner. I always tune my rebound a little soft to "hold" the front end down in the turns. As always some other facet of handeling will be negitively affected by softer rebound, and everything is a compramise, so I guess just try it and see if you notice a difference...

  • matts06yzf

Posted July 23, 2007 - 05:45 AM

#19

I went up on sag after Enzo did my suspension. They recomended 103mm on my 06 it seemed better at 105mm but, I am still not happy with the turning. The faster I get the more pissed I get. I have been riding 4-6 days a week and my speed as increased alot and I notice the "push" more and more

  • grayracer513

Posted July 23, 2007 - 07:51 AM

#20

One reason that the sag dimension can and will vary from stock suspension vs. those with suspension work is that taken by themselves, the sag numbers don't say anything about the amount of front end dive that occurs at the turn entrance. That does often change once the forks are redone. Some people, especially those who rely heavily on the rear brake, or who don't brake very hard entering a fast turn, will have more trouble with the front end pushing that those who brake hard. Rule of thumb, the more the front compresses, the better the turn in.

Some might want to read this as well, or not:

http://www.thumperta...663#post5050663





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