Switching to full synthetic (not another oil brand thread)


15 replies to this topic
  • Goosedog

Posted July 18, 2007 - 08:58 AM

#1

After reading how good Amsoil synthetic does against all other oils I got a case today for my 426.

Since the bike was new I've run the Yamalube 4R 'blend'.

I know I'm upgrading to a better brand oil, but my question here is; are there any side affects for switching from a blend to a full synthetic on a bike that has lots of hours on it.

  • grayracer513

Posted July 18, 2007 - 11:02 AM

#2

No. You can switch from full syn to petro to blended and back with no consequences pretty much any time. The only oils to avoid swapping to without flushing are the castor based oils, and they're almost never used anymore.

Very rarely, a seal problem will surface with an old engine that has used Ester synthetics for a very long time and then switches to a petroleum oil or a PAO based synthetic. Ester oils have some very strong solvent properties, and over time, some of the components of the oil will work into the rubber of the seals. When you change to a non ester oil, these solvents slowly migrate out of the seals, causing them to dry out and shrink. Again, this is rare, and happens only when changing from esters to other oils on older engines where esters have been used for an extended period.

  • Goosedog

Posted July 18, 2007 - 01:30 PM

#3

Thanks GR.:thumbsup:

  • Racer24

Posted July 18, 2007 - 05:24 PM

#4

are you abusive with the clutch?

if you are you should run a Synthetic blend oil...i read somewhere that using a full synthetic can cause clutch plate slippage if you are abusive with the clutch...put def. run some type of synthetic oil, will last longer and dissipates heat better

  • grayracer513

Posted July 18, 2007 - 06:22 PM

#5

...i read somewhere that using a full synthetic can cause clutch plate slippage if you are abusive with the clutch...

What you read is wrong.

The "bad" oils are ECII (API Energy Conserving Group II) oils. These oils contain friction reducers that may cause a wet clutch to slip or behave badly. It also happens that nearly all of them are synthetics and blended for cars, too, ergo, "synthetic car oil is bad for your clutch". Bad logic.



  • jw yama 76

Posted July 18, 2007 - 06:35 PM

#6

Well I acn think of none for our spoey..However My 91 Chevy Took a Oil change from never to synthetic duralube and blew it all over my house when I started it up? I called the company ...Too bad for me.. All I can figure is the truck has 120,000 Ans when I put added the duralube it dissoleved the deposites and allowed the oil to blow right past the rings:thumbsdn: NICE:foul:

  • jw yama 76

Posted July 18, 2007 - 06:37 PM

#7

Sorry for the spelling errors I'm not A CPU wizzard..

  • grayracer513

Posted July 18, 2007 - 07:34 PM

#8

If you had a truck that old that had been that badly neglected, it wouldn't have mattered what you put in it, or even whether or not you changed it. That one is nobody's fault but your own.

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  • Octane250F

Posted July 18, 2007 - 09:26 PM

#9

As long as you use an oil thats approved for use with wet clutches, you should be fine.
My brother used to use Amsoil MCF in his '04 Polaris Predator and it worked just fine.

  • TeamPrecisionIT

Posted July 19, 2007 - 02:16 AM

#10

The main reason to switch to a synthetic oil is for temperature stability. It doesn't thicken up so much in the cold and it doesn't thin out as much in the heat. Yes, it will stay in its range (10w-40 or whichever) but yes there is an advantage. As far as clutch slippage, that shouldn't happen unless there is a problem in the clutch already. As long you do not use an 'energy conserving' motor oil, anything will work as long as it is clean and fresh.

  • TeamPrecisionIT

Posted July 19, 2007 - 02:18 AM

#11

However My 91 Chevy Took a Oil change from never to synthetic duralube...


That was the problem there, not the oil. The oil did its job by trapping the deposits left behind by an oil that had run its course a long time prior and most likely is what damaged your rings, not the new stuff.

  • grayracer513

Posted July 19, 2007 - 08:08 AM

#12

The main reason to switch to a synthetic oil is for temperature stability. It doesn't thicken up so much in the cold and it doesn't thin out as much in the heat.

What you describe is a feature of any multigrade oil, either petro or synthetic, regardless of the base stock used. Thin (low viscosity) base oils are enhanced with Viscosity Index Improvers to achieve this. Their function is to reduce the normal, heat related thinning (reduction of viscosity) that occurs, thereby allowing a 10wt base oil to be no less viscous at 200 degrees than a single grade 40wt. One advantage to synthetics in regard to this is that a good many synthetic base oils have a higher viscosity index to start with, meaning that they thin out less with heat, and as a result, they require less VII's to perform as a multigrade than natural petroleum oils need.

The thing with synthetics and heat is that they are generally less prone to oxidization and other forms of heat related damage than petro oils.

  • Type Gendy

Posted July 19, 2007 - 07:18 PM

#13

I dont mean to thread jack here, but also dont wanna start a whole new "oil" thread...

I did a lot of research this week on what type of oil to run in my new 426... and a lot of people recommend the mobil1 15w-50 red top full synthetic.

Now i went to walmart tonight and got a 5qt jug of it the synthetic 15w-50, but it had a grey top on it, no red ones in sight??

  • grayracer513

Posted July 20, 2007 - 07:32 AM

#14

I did a lot of research this week on what type of oil to run in my new 426... and a lot of people recommend the mobil1 15w-50 red top full synthetic.

That info is old, and that oil has been replaced by Mobil 1 Extended Performance 15W-50 (gold cap). While it is an excellent engine oil, it was not blended for use as a transmission lubricant, and could very well fail to maintain its viscosity for very long when used in a YZF. Mobil themselves states: "Mobil 1 motorcycle oils have additive packages balanced differently for motorcycle engine and transmission operation." Otherwise, it's a good oil. If you get it cheap enough to be able to change it out every other ride at the most, you might be OK with it. Then again, sending a sample of used out of for analysis could be quite startling.

  • Type Gendy

Posted July 20, 2007 - 12:18 PM

#15

I'll just return it and go for yamalube or the mobil1 bike oil if i can find it, thanks man

  • crazyal426

Posted July 28, 2007 - 01:47 PM

#16

Amsoil ROCKS!!!! That is all.





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