Does having the IMS tank stink up your garage?


18 replies to this topic
  • bigboy292000

Posted July 16, 2007 - 05:24 AM

#1

Hi,

I am wondering - seeing that the IMS tank is not a DOT approved tank and has a breather pipe on the cap (unlike the stocker) - do you guys find that having the IMS tank your garage smells like gas all the time?

  • mxrob

Posted July 16, 2007 - 06:16 AM

#2

Hi,

I am wondering - seeing that the IMS tank is not a DOT approved tank and has a breather pipe on the cap (unlike the stocker) - do you guys find that having the IMS tank your garage smells like gas all the time?


Your stock cap is vented unless you have a CA model. Otherwise there would be no way for the fuel to leave the tank. As far as fuel smell in the garage goes you have the same chance of that from lawnmowers, trimmers and the like.

  • bigboy292000

Posted July 16, 2007 - 07:18 AM

#3

Thanks mx_rob - that makes sense...

I guess then I am trying to figure - I guess there is no difference between the IMS and stock tank smell-wise?

I know it sounds like a silly question but - as my wife's car and my kids toys are in the garage too and I get this and it's gonna stink more than the stock (which really smells just after a ride and then it goes away) - they will not like me for it. I'd like to be able to set expectations properly :thumbsup:

  • truck6driver

Posted July 16, 2007 - 07:18 AM

#4

I have had an IMS on an XR650L for 7 years and have not had a problem with the vented cap. If you are worried about it you can buy a check valve that goes inline on the vent tube and only allows air in and not out. This also helps keep the fuel from going out the tube if you lay the bike down. You can get them from any cycle shop or catalog.
As far as DOT rated goes, it deals with crash worthiness not fuel venting.

RH

  • mxrob

Posted July 16, 2007 - 07:29 AM

#5

Thanks mx_rob - that makes sense...

I guess then I am trying to figure - I guess there is no difference between the IMS and stock tank smell-wise?

I know it sounds like a silly question but - as my wife's car and my kids toys are in the garage too and I get this and it's gonna stink more than the stock (which really smells just after a ride and then it goes away) - they will not like me for it. I'd like to be able to set expectations properly :thumbsup:


Remember your carb is vented as well so there are plenty of ways for fuel smell to eminate from your bike with or without a plastic tank. My motocross bikes have had plastic tanks for a long time. I don't remember the garage smelling any worse when the tanks changed from steel and aluminum to plastic.

  • sharpblade

Posted July 16, 2007 - 07:58 AM

#6

I noticed after installing my IMS tank that the garage did smell of gas every time I open the door. Did not notice this with the stock tank. I believe the ims tank is porous and breathes, emiting the odor.

  • NordieBoy

Posted July 16, 2007 - 01:40 PM

#7

I noticed after installing my IMS tank that the garage did smell of gas every time I open the door. Did not notice this with the stock tank. I believe the ims tank is porous and breathes, emiting the odor.


On mine it's the fuel tap the causes the smell.
Not enough leakage to drip but just enough to smell.

  • Sundog

Posted July 16, 2007 - 01:44 PM

#8

Hi,

I am wondering - seeing that the IMS tank is not a DOT approved tank and has a breather pipe on the cap (unlike the stocker) - do you guys find that having the IMS tank your garage smells like gas all the time?


What aftermarket tank is DOT approved?:thumbsup:


My 4.25 gallon IMS tank smells no more that any of the other bike tanks...as far as letting out gas smell.

  • bigboy292000

Posted July 16, 2007 - 03:33 PM

#9

What aftermarket tank is DOT approved?:thumbsup:


That is a fair question... I guess the DOT approval here is not the key, but I was rather interested in the experience with - well - how smelly it is.

I still feel silly starting a thread about how smelly the bike is in the garage but hey - it's something I need to consider. :thumbsup:

  • rpeterk

Posted July 16, 2007 - 09:52 PM

#10

in order to be dot approved an aftermarket tank needs to be made of steel just like the original

the other thing you need to consider is if the tank holds let say twice as much it is going to breath basically twice as much also

  • NordieBoy

Posted July 17, 2007 - 01:24 AM

#11

the other thing you need to consider is if the tank holds let say twice as much it is going to breath basically twice as much also


Only if it had twice the surface area of a tank made of the same materials.

  • Sundog

Posted July 17, 2007 - 05:03 AM

#12

in order to be dot approved an aftermarket tank needs to be made of steel just like the original


Urban Legend..........if you really believe this please find and quote a federal, state or local statute that requires a gas tank to be DOT. I have been searching for quite a while and have never had anyone find one yet. I have talked with highway patrol and city cops that swear it is there somewhere.....but can never find anything.

KTMs and Huskys come with plastic tanks and are plateable bikes right out of the crate. Some cars also come with plastic tanks......so I chalk the steel tank thing up to an urban legend.

  • rpeterk

Posted July 17, 2007 - 05:30 AM

#13

Only if it had twice the surface area of a tank made of the same materials.


well the heat effects the fuel and if there is twice the fuel then there is twice the expansion right plus the expansion or contraction caused by the tank itself


Urban Legend..........if you really believe this please find and quote a federal, state or local statute that requires a gas tank to be DOT. I have been searching for quite a while and have never had anyone find one yet. I have talked with highway patrol and city cops that swear it is there somewhere.....but can never find anything.

KTMs and Huskys come with plastic tanks and are plateable bikes right out of the crate. Some cars also come with plastic tanks......so I chalk the steel tank thing up to an urban legend.


I talked to 2 different bike shops and to the dmv here is jersey and they all said the same plus I have read it on many different sites. I am glad to hear that the ktms come that way and the next time I am at that dealer as they also sell the dr I will check and verify that myself

thanks for the info

  • Sundog

Posted July 17, 2007 - 05:37 AM

#14

I talked to 2 different bike shops and to the dmv here is jersey and they all said the same plus I have read it on many different sites. I am glad to hear that the ktms come that way and the next time I am at that dealer as they also sell the dr I will check and verify that myself

thanks for the info

I hear ya....I hear it from everybody. But once I started checking in to it not a single person, including law enforcement, could find the 'steel tank law'.

If you, or they, ever find one then please forward me the link or cite the appropriate statute...I would appreciate it.

Other road legal machines with plastic tanks:
Aprilla
Triumph
Husky TE610E
Harley V-Rod
Buell Cyclone
Honda Pilot - Truck

  • SSonnentag

Posted July 17, 2007 - 08:17 AM

#15

My 2006 Silverado has a "plastic" tank.

Here's some interesting info from a website Google found for me:

" One characteristic of plastic fuel tanks is that they allow small amounts of fuel to permeate through the tank walls. The amount of fuel lost this way is quite small and is not usually missed by the owner. However, if one adds up the small amounts of hydrocarbon losses from the hundreds of millions of plastic fuel tanks in use in the U.S., this represents a substantial amount of air pollution. Therefore, various Federal and State agencies continue to enact legislation to increasingly reduce this source of pollution. In fact, new legislation is scheduled for enactment in the next few years that will affect millions of plastic fuel tanks made each year for various non-automotive applications. Existing technologies for increasing the fuel-barrier properties appear to not be sufficiently effective for all of these tanks. Fluoro-Seal has developed two different types of technologies for significantly increasing the barrier properties of plastic fuel tanks. The company is working with tank manufacturers and plastic resin suppliers to optimize these technologies. With the combination of these two different approaches, the company is confident that all types of plastic fuel tanks, independent of the molding process used to make them, can be made compliant with new evaporative loss regulations."

http://www.fluorosea...ntumescent.html

  • SSonnentag

Posted July 17, 2007 - 08:48 AM

#16

Most recent EPA regs:

http://www.epa.gov/E...Day-15/a006.htm

Various comments found on the net:

"In 2008, the EPA will implement standards that will require the use of low permeability fuel tanks and fuel hoses on all motorcycles (2010 for small manufacturers). Though the fuel tanks installed on most American street motorcycles are metal, which is considered impermeable, Harley’s V-Rod and the Buell Blast both sport plastic gas tanks."


"Patterned after California’s tiered approach, the Tier 1 Federal standards will take effect with motorcycles produced in 2006, and Tier 2 Federal standards will be implemented in 2010. Small motorcycle manufacturers, defined by the EPA as those producing less than 3,000 units per year in the US and having less than 500 employees, will not have to comply with Tier 1 Federal standards until 2008, and are exempt from the Tier 2 standards. There are 42 manufacturers that certified motorcycles in 2003, and of those, 30 manufacturers are considered “small” by the Small Business Administration definition. The certification data shows that all of these manufacturers are currently meeting the Tier 1 exhaust emission standard."


"There is a one-time exception from the rule for individual owners who build custom bikes or kit bikes. A consumer can build one motorcycle for his own use that will be exempt from emission standards. This exception applies if the consumer purchased the kit and built it or had someone build it for him. The exception does not apply if a shop buys or builds a custom bike or kit bike, and then offers it for sale. Also, there are limitations, such as the motorcycle can’t be modified and it can’t be sold for five years."


"A concern of many is whether the new rule will affect what can be modified on a bike you currently own. The “tampering” prohibition, added to the Clean Air Act over 20 years ago, remains unchanged. Parts manufacturers can still create parts, dealers can sell and install parts, and owners can customize their motorcycles in any way, as long as they do not disable emission controls or cause the motorcycle to exceed the emission standards. However, that’s exactly what happens when an owner installs performance-enhancing modifications to his engine, such as changing the exhaust pipes."

  • SSonnentag

Posted July 17, 2007 - 08:51 AM

#17

So, in summary, if your motorcycle came with a metal gas tank, you are in violation of federal law when you install a plastic tank. You are in violation if you swap out your exhaust system for a high-performance one. You are in violation if you strip off your California evaporative emissions CR4P. You are in violation if you install a jet kit. Basically, you're all crimanals! Now go turn yourselves in to your nearest police department.


PS Have a nice day. :thumbsup:

  • Sundog

Posted July 17, 2007 - 09:42 AM

#18

PS Have a nice day. :thumbsup:


:thumbsup:

Yep, am aware of those regs. Still looking for the 'steel tank' specific requirements though...

  • truck6driver

Posted July 17, 2007 - 02:34 PM

#19

It has been told to me that the DOT tanks must meet crash worthiness test. It does not state what type of material it is made of. The aftermarket tanks are made of the same material as most automotive tanks. The difference is it has not been tested to crash testing. DOT tanks must meet requirements for puncture resistance, spliting and heat resistance. Basically if you crash on the street and the tank ruptures, they can get you for a fuel spill clean up. That said, if a hazardous materials team has to come clean up a spill from a DOT tank you still get charged for the clean up. So who cares? If I get into a crash where my tank ruptures and catches fire, I don't think I will be in any condition to give a sh#$. I will still run a NON-DOT tank until it cost me more not too.

Soap box time over.

RH




 
x

Join Our Community!

Even if you don't want to post, registered members get access to tools that make finding & following the good stuff easier.

RegisterSign InClose
If you enjoyed reading about "" here in the ThumperTalk archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join ThumperTalk today!

The views and opinions expressed on this page are strictly those of the author, and have not been reviewed or approved by ThumperTalk.