Still stuck on the oil thing! (overfull, Drain a bit out?, hhhhmmmm I don't know?)



10 replies to this topic
  • BlueHondaEater

Posted May 01, 2000 - 02:25 PM

#1

OK if I loosen the drain plug and let some of the oil out will this cause damage to my engine? Or shall I just drain out all the oil and get a new filter (since I just cleaned the old one with gas and put it back in) and do it over the correct way?

  • Kevin_in_New_Hampshire

Posted May 01, 2000 - 02:51 PM

#2

BlueHondaEater Dude,
If you want to be safe and HAPPY, drain the oil out both drain plugs keeping your filter in. Put in the amount needed (1500 - 1600 cc's?), start it up for 2 minutes, shut her down and check the oil. It should be OK. Note the level on the dipstick since now you know what the level is supposed to indicate. Castrol GTX is only $1.50/qt. That is a pretty cheap good nights sleep.

  • Matt_Porritt

Posted May 05, 2000 - 02:28 AM

#3

Castrol GTX is only $1.50/qt. That is a pretty cheap good nights sleep.


How can you sleep good at night after putting car oil in you bike?
Its not designed for bikes.
Being a Castrol dealer myslelf, the motorcycle equivilant to straight GTX (not Protec or Magnatec) is Grand Prix.
Both these oils are a mineral oil, but GTX is designed for cars made up to the mid 80s.
Grand Prix is designed for motocycles operating under everyday condtions.
The oil I recommend (If you want to use Castrol) is GPS.
Its semi syn and designed for use in performance offroad motorcycles.

Hope this is is help to someone...

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**Ride it like you Stole it!**
Matt Porritt
99 YZ400F
Rubber Chicken Racing

  • Ron_in_SoCal

Posted May 05, 2000 - 06:51 AM

#4

BHD,

I would use Torco MPZ 20-50 in your Blue Honda Eating Machine. Do yourself and your clutch a favor and keep the car oil in your car.

  • Kevin_in_New_Hampshire

Posted May 05, 2000 - 09:55 PM

#5

I have been using Castrol GTX in my bikes since 1980. I have NEVER had any clutch problems, abnormal wear or any reason not to use it. I raced a CR250 Honda from 1990 - 1996 on the original STOCK clutch. I also fanned the crap out of the clutch. I normally shoot berms a gear high and clutch out of them. I also just read an article written by a (physisist/Chemical Engineer?) at USC who had performed tests on oils. He rides bikes. He found out the Castrol GTX OUTPERFORMED the special motorcycle oil of Spectro. The Spectro broke down quicker thereby losing it's lubricating abilities. I am very content using my GTX. I have no reason to change. Thank you gentlemen for the concern however.
Kevin


[This message has been edited by Kevin in New Hampshire (edited 05-05-2000).]

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  • Eric_in_WA

Posted May 05, 2000 - 01:21 PM

#6

If you look in the latest MXA in the YZ250 setup tips they claim that Yamaha RECOMMENDS Yamahas oil OR Castrol GTX for the transmission. If Castrol GTX was bad for clutches would Yamaha recommend it???

Eric in WA

  • Kevin_in_New_Hampshire

Posted May 05, 2000 - 01:35 PM

#7

Thanks Eric. I have given out enough bum dope related to our 4 strokers on this web sight. All my knowledge is based upon riding and wrenching on 2 strokes since 1972. Maybe I am wrong on this also, but until I actually see something, I'll stick to my guns. This oil thing reminds me of medical doctors and psychiatrists. These guys only know what they are TAUGHT. They do not know different. In the middle ages, the doctors use to cut their patients open to drain out blood. They thought they could rid the body of the ailment by draining blood. Up to the late 60's, the Dr.s would cut the meniscus (cartilage) out of athletes knees, if torn. They had no clue the cartilage absorbed the impact of the joints to prevent damage to the bones themselves. Dr. Sigmend Freud thought anything to do with the brain was sexually based, psychologically. Their students felt the same. They only know what they are taught.
Thanks again, Eric. You are now in my will!

  • Matt_Porritt

Posted May 05, 2000 - 11:43 PM

#8

If you look in the latest MXA in the YZ250 setup tips they claim that Yamaha RECOMMENDS Yamahas oil OR Castrol GTX for the transmission. If Castrol GTX was bad for clutches would Yamaha recommend it???


No one said it was bad for clutches.
My point was that there is a motorcycle desgined oil made by Castrol that is similar as far as price and being mineral based but is DESIGNED for use in a motorcycle.
There are certian adative that cars need and bikes don't and visa versa.
Is it not more piece of mind using a product thats designed for a bike?
Another thing is GTX is 20-50 while Grand Prix is 15-40.. little nicer to have a freer running oil when the bike is 1st started up.

My $0.02 worth as a retailer though.

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**Ride it like you Stole it!**
Matt Porritt
99 YZ400F
Rubber Chicken Racing

  • Matt_Porritt

Posted May 05, 2000 - 11:50 PM

#9

If Castrol GTX was bad for clutches would Yamaha recommend it???


How would they know??
Most factory backed racers only do 1 moto on a clutch..
How would they know if it was anygood or not?
GTX 'may' have no friction modifiers and the like in it.. but when you KNOW Grand Prix doesn't then 'That is a pretty cheap good nights sleep'

If anyones interested email me porrittm@anet.co.nz and I'll contact the Castrol Lab here and get the techies to fax me some info on the difference etc.

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**Ride it like you Stole it!**
Matt Porritt
99 YZ400F
Rubber Chicken Racing

  • MotoGreg

Posted May 06, 2000 - 03:45 PM

#10

This question always comes up and yet does anyone know of any clutch trouble due to oil in recorded history? My street bike puts out 136hp at the back wheel and I've never had a clutch problem. I had one street bike that I sold with 46,500 miles and it had the original clutch. I've never used any kind of special "motorcycle oil" and the majority of the people I know don't either. If you plan to leave the oil in for a really long time then it's good because the motorcycle oil has additives to increase the shear strength to keep it from breaking down under the stress of the trans gears. If you change your oil on a regular basis then you don't need the extra shear strength. Who ever said the oil had anything to do with the clutch in the first place, the difference is because a bike uses the engine oil in the trans. It is much better to change your oil more often than it is to try and get it to last longer by using motorcycle oil.

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'99 WR400
'92 GSXR 7/11
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  • Matt_Porritt

Posted May 06, 2000 - 04:12 PM

#11

does anyone know of any clutch trouble due to oil in recorded history?


Its a fact that oils containg friction modifiers will damage clutches.

It is much better to change your oil more often than it is to try and get it to last longer by using motorcycle oil.


Oil change times wasn't the argument.
The argument was oveer using an oil designed for motorcyles or using an oil designed for cars.
Both the oils in mention are the same price.
So I suppose the point is using the correct 'tool' for the right job.


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**Ride it like you Stole it!**
Matt Porritt
99 YZ400F
Rubber Chicken Racing




 
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