Raising the forks up? & shorting the wheel base?



8 replies to this topic
  • William

Posted April 10, 2000 - 09:36 PM

#1

Like MotoGreg did 13 mm,will this cause my bike to handle at different at higher speeds or jumping the bike, or will it just make the bike handle better in tight stuff.

Ho ya and how about moving to rear wheel as close to the engine as possible by removing a like in the chain, how will this speed, jumping ect. ect.

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2000 WR400F

  • William

Posted April 10, 2000 - 02:00 PM

#2

Will this cause head shake?

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2000 WR400F

  • Mitch_from_Oz

Posted April 10, 2000 - 02:08 PM

#3

Hi Wiliam,

A shorter wheel base will casue additional head shake in bumpy/rutted high speed conditions. You can aleviate the shake with a steering dampner. But, the steering certainly is improved.

Mitch

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Motard Mitch

  • MotoGreg

Posted April 10, 2000 - 04:30 PM

#4

Mine is plenty stable at speed. Also make sure your sag is set right. If you are heavy the rear will sag that kicks the steering head angle out and slows the steering. Mine is really ripping around through the trees on the tight stuff now, I couldn't be happier. I was thinking about getting the Scotts clamps that pull the forks back but now I'm not going to bother, it's perfect now :)

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'99 WR400
'92 GSXR 7/11
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  • Dan_in_pa

Posted April 10, 2000 - 04:59 PM

#5

Hey Motogreg,I'm still frustrated with my 99 WR washing out and pushing through wet turns. I weigh 182 and have made no changes to my bike yet. What do you suggest first. My inclination is to replace the dunlop 739 first.

  • mcarp

Posted April 10, 2000 - 06:00 PM

#6

Raising the forks will help with turning. A shorter wheelbase will also help. I raised my forks about 10mm, felt a slight difference and no adverse high speed headshake. The fastest I have gone is maybe 60 or so. The WR is so darn stable, slight changes won't make it that much less stable.

I will be shortening my wheelbase slightly as well. Take one link out of the chain to start, this will increase the wheelbase by 1/2 the length of the link.

I wouldn't go too drastic, too short of a wheelbase will make it hard to handle on steep hills. The desert guys probably like the long wheelbase, on the trail a slightly shorter one can only help!

Go for it, let us know what happens. I am going to try 13/50 (I believe what you have) and try 1 link shorter first. Chances are two links will be just right, but I prefer to make slight changes 1 at a time.

  • MotoGreg

Posted April 10, 2000 - 06:34 PM

#7

One link is 32mm so that moves your wheel 16mm. That is as far as you can go, the tire is almost touching the mudflap. I don't know about washing out the front, all I know is that I couldn't get the thing to feel nimble and toss it quickly through the twisty singletrack we ride. With the few adjustments I've done it's finally perfect now.

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'99 WR400
'92 GSXR 7/11
Visit my photo album AT YOUR OWN RISK!! My photo album
Anyone here a sportbike fan also? Then visit us here at www.insanespeed.com

  • William

Posted April 10, 2000 - 06:55 PM

#8

Dan, i changed my tires to pirelli mt 16 at 13 lbs pressure it's like night and day and pirelli grip really well and seem to hold up on the hard stuff too, it's a very good all around tire, next i might try a pirelli mt 44 on the front just to get it perfect.

But get rid of those stock wash out 739's

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2000 WR400F

  • Kevin_in_New_Hampshire

Posted April 11, 2000 - 01:35 AM

#9

Prior to removing a link in the chain, be sure you have enough slack to allow the shock to stroke all the way through. The chain achieves maximum length when the swingarm is completely horizontal to its mount. My Brother didn't realize this in 1976 on his TS185 Suzuki. When the suspension compressed, he RIPPED the teeth off of his sprockets! Initially, he thought his transmission went when the bike just sat there. It was his chain spinning around on his toothless sprockets!
To see for yourself how much slack you really need try this. Remove the shock from your bike, keeping the wheel/chain on the bike. Now move the wheel through it's arc. You can see at which point the chain is most taut. My trick is to tighten the chain to it's tightest point WHILE still allowing full movement of the swingarm. When you find this point, put the shock back on. With the bike on a stand and the shock fully extended, find a convienient spot on the swingarm to measure the chain slack you now have. Write it down or commit it to memory. This way you can quickly check if your chain is fat (that would be fat, dumb and happy).




 
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