Grease me up



25 replies to this topic
  • Mike

Posted May 30, 2000 - 04:48 PM

#1

What are the areas on the bike that need to be greased and how long is the process? I have always had someone else do this stuff, but now I am going to try. Any tips would be great. Important areas, time frames, difficulty in getting to these areas etc.

Thx

Mike

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98WR White Bros E Series stock head pipe, IMS Tank/seat Pro Tapers Works Connection guards. Stock timing

  • Guest_Guest_*

Posted May 30, 2000 - 04:59 PM

#2

Depending on what kind of conditions you ride in would make a difference on how long between greasings. If you ride in sand a lot, I would do a through greasing every three or so weeks. If you spend a lot of time in water, I would probably go no longer than a couple months and other conditions than that I would probably let it go as far a 3-4 months.
The areas I consider high maintenance would be the swingarm-linkage and the steering head bearings. (I simplified this area by putting a grease zerk on the steering head so you no longer have to take apart the triple clamp to put grease in) The swingarm has a bit more to it. Just follow what your manual tells you to do and you shouldnt have any problems. The easiest way to learn how to do it is just dig in and if you have any questions, I think this forum will have you covered. Good luck!

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Darin from Missouri WR400F Pro-Tapers, Applied TC, Clarke 3.3, YZ seat, Scotts Shark Fin, FMF PC IV S.A., One Industries Hannah Retro Kit, WER Steering Dampner,Pacemaker Computer, Andrews Powder Coating-painted gloss black

  • jj

Posted May 30, 2000 - 07:34 PM

#3

Milkman, what are the odds of you posting instructions for putting a zerk fitting on your steering head in the tech section?

JJ

  • Kevin_in_New_Hampshire

Posted May 31, 2000 - 08:03 AM

#4

You don't want to say, "Grease me up" the next time you are in prison for the weekend!! :)

  • Mike

Posted May 31, 2000 - 08:12 AM

#5

At least it got a little attention. Got out of prison a few years ago and never dropped the soap. HA :)

Thanks for the tips and info on the zerk fitting would be great. Has anyone taken photos of the lubing process (not prison photos)for the tech section that would help or could they

Mike

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98WR White Bros E Series stock head pipe, IMS Tank/seat Pro Tapers Works Connection guards. Stock timing

  • James_Dean

Posted May 31, 2000 - 08:32 AM

#6

Lubed my linkage and swingarm last weekend, it took about 3 hours without rushing. Cleaning dirt/mud off stuff takes extra time above the actual greasing up the bearings. Be sure you have a good selection of large sockets and a torque wrench is a good idea. The factory didn't put much grease in the bearings, so you shouldn't put it off if you are riding in mud or wet conditions.

I hate doing it and only tear it apart about once per year. I've put zerks in before, and they are nice to have, but the time and money adds up to more than it's worth if the bike gets sold after only 2-3 years.
James Dean

  • Guest_Guest_*

Posted May 31, 2000 - 08:51 AM

#7

A zerk on the steering head isnt really too much of a problem. All you have to do is go to your local hardware store and get one that is self-tapping and is not an angled zerk.
After you completely disassemble the steering head (leave bearing races in), find a suitable place that nothing is going to rub agianst it. (I put mine in front of the CDI Black box)
Drill (starting with a small bit) a hole in the steering head and step up to the next drill bit untill you get the hole big enough to snug the zerk in tightly. Re-assemble everyting and fill with grease.
I dont have a digital camera but I will se if I can get one and if Bryan is intrested I will send them on to him to post.

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Darin from Missouri WR400F Pro-Tapers, Applied TC, Clarke 3.3, YZ seat, Scotts Shark Fin, FMF PC IV S.A., One Industries Hannah Retro Kit, WER Steering Dampner,Pacemaker Computer, Andrews Powder Coating-painted gloss black

  • jj

Posted May 31, 2000 - 02:19 PM

#8

Milkman, you said in your last post to leave the race in while installing the zerk, why?
I'm ass-u-"me"-ing that you say this so you can make sure you drill above the races.
How much dirt and grime did you find inside the steering head? Enough that it's still worth pulling it a part and cleaning it twice a year anyway? If so, I probably skip it and just deal.
I was also thinking that with a zerk you'll be squeezing alot more grease in than you really need simply because the zerk isnt at all directional. I guess it wouldnt hurt though.
Thanks!

JJ

[This message has been edited by JJ (edited 05-31-2000).]

  • Guest_Guest_*

Posted May 31, 2000 - 02:52 PM

#9

JJ, I am refering to the bearing races. There is a upper and a lower and there is no reason to remove the races to tap a zerk in. If you pull out the lower triple tree w/steering stem you will see what I am talking about. The bearings will just fall right out but the races (what the bearings run against) will stay in place. You will drill inbetween the 2 races.
I didnt waste any time taking care of mine. I done it as soon as I bought my bike off the showroom floor. So, no there wasnt any dirt in there. But, because it came from Japan, and since they have never heard of grease, there wasnt any of that in there either.
My main reason for doing it was I heard that the hot oil circulates though the frame and actually heats up the frame and therefore causes the grease to actually melt out of the steering head.
Also, to answer your last question, yes, you will be putting in a lot more grease than you actually need. It has to fill up the entire cavity before it will push it out the top or bottom. You might add 4 oz. of weight to your bike, but its worth it to me.

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Darin from Missouri WR400F Pro-Tapers, Applied TC, Clarke 3.3, YZ seat, Scotts Shark Fin, FMF PC IV S.A., One Industries Hannah Retro Kit, WER Steering Dampner,Pacemaker Computer, Andrews Powder Coating-painted gloss black

  • James_Dean

Posted May 31, 2000 - 07:36 PM

#10

Milkman, Have you gotten your bike really hot yet? If the grease actually does melt, will the seals keep it in? The last time I had a zerk fitting on the steering head, (a Honda), it would slowly leak grease on the front fender. The steering head seals usually don't amount to much more than a dust cover.

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  • Guest_Guest_*

Posted June 01, 2000 - 08:35 AM

#11

My bike has never really gotten that hot. But if its scorching out here in the Midwest then I tend to lean toward the air conditioned places. Plus, I also prefer the short courses to the long in races so it may not have as much time to heat up.
But your right, they arent more than a dust cover. The premise to me is, if some leaks out due to temperatures, just pump some more in.

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Darin from Missouri WR400F Pro-Tapers, Applied TC, Clarke 3.3, YZ seat, Scotts Shark Fin, FMF PC IV S.A., One Industries Hannah Retro Kit, WER Steering Dampner,Pacemaker Computer, Andrews Powder Coating-painted gloss black

  • jj

Posted June 01, 2000 - 05:14 PM

#12

Just took my steering head apart. I found the top bearing was completely rusted over. It looks like the top dust seal was nicked up. If you look at the dust seal from the bottom you see that there is a lower seal that comes down over the top of the bearing, that is the portion that appeared worn most. I found a fair amount of dirt and gravel inside. I definately waited to long. Hell, I only bought my bike last July!

Here's the big problem, I cant seem to get out the top race, or the bottom bearing! What gives, I've pounded and pounded, nothing! Any advise?

Milkman it looks like your zerk idea is really the ticket. The inside of the head is starting to RUST. I'm heading to the hardwear store!

JJ

  • mcarp

Posted June 01, 2000 - 06:50 PM

#13

I went bizerk greasing, loctite/torque bolts, and every other detail you can think of before riding the WR. Definitely take everything apart and use high temp grease on everything. high temp grease won't ooze as much when hot. You;ll be amazed how little grease is present EVERYWHERE. It has the consistentcy of Elmers Glue. You need a 30, 27, 22 mm sockets for everything, I think you need two 22's for something, not positive. All long sockets won't work. (Also 24mm long socket for the frame mounted oil filter)


All the greasing took a long afternoon, wasn't a big deal just lay out the parts and refer to the manual often. If you have all the tools, you shouldn't get stuck :)

  • Mike

Posted June 01, 2000 - 07:12 PM

#14

thanks for all the remarks. Next weekend is my first go at this. If I fail I will let you know.

Mike

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98WR White Bros E Series stock head pipe, IMS Tank/seat Pro Tapers Works Connection guards. Stock timing

  • Guest_Guest_*

Posted June 02, 2000 - 08:57 AM

#15

Just remember Mike, dont drill to big to start. Start small and work your way up untill the zerk taps in tightly (as I mentioned in earlier post)
Go to big and you will have a hole in your steering head for no reason! :)

JJ, the bottom bearing should have come off with the steering stem (its pressed on) Im not sure what you mean, unless you mean you cant get the bottom race out. A long screwdriver should take care of both ends.
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Darin from Missouri WR400F Pro-Tapers, Applied TC, Clarke 3.3, YZ seat, Scotts Shark Fin, FMF PC IV S.A., One Industries Hannah Retro Kit, WER Steering Dampner,Pacemaker Computer, Andrews Powder Coating-painted gloss black

[This message has been edited by milkman2544 (edited 06-02-2000).]

  • Mike

Posted June 02, 2000 - 11:57 AM

#16

Milkman,

I am going to wait a bit on the Zerk. I want to learn the other stuff first, make sure I know what I am doing, then maybe try your technique down the road. But I have it printed and stored for that future try.

thanks again

Mike

  • jj

Posted June 02, 2000 - 05:39 PM

#17

Its actually the bottom bearing I cant get off, its pressed on. A local dealer is goin to press it off for me for a 1/2 rack of Henrys. I just cant get over how much dirt was in the top of the head!
The more I think about it the less likely I think I am to put in a zerk. Here's why; If I fill up the whole cavity with extra grease it definately would stop the rusting and keep the bearings greased but it wont stop the dirt and grime from getting in. I sure dont want to have to clean up all that extra grease everytime I take it apart to clean out the grime. I think what I'll do is grease it up extra well and just be sure to check it every six months, maybe even more...

JJ

  • James_Dean

Posted June 02, 2000 - 08:50 PM

#18

JJ,
Make sure the top seal is in good condition and NEVER pressure wash near any bearing seals. It shouldn't get much dirt around the seal normally with careful washing.

  • jj

Posted June 02, 2000 - 09:14 PM

#19

Actually, I think that has been the problem, or at least a contributing factor. I wash my bike using my hose with a nosel on it. It's definately not a pressure washer but I think it's enough to get inside the wimpy seal on top of the head.
Ponder this; What about a small silicone bead laid around the top of the seal, in a effort to completely seal out any moisture or grime. A silicone bead could be easily removed when you discide to check you bearings. What do you think?

JJ

  • James_Dean

Posted June 02, 2000 - 09:33 PM

#20

JJ,
I think the silicone would fall off or just get more dirt around it. For a CR500 I tried making a second dust cover with a plastic bottle about the same diameter as the steering head. I cut about 1/4 inch off the bottom and cut a hole in it about the size of the top dust cover. Made 1 cut to split it. Turned it upside down and slipped it over the dust cover and just under the top triple clamp. This shed most of the water off before it could get to the factory seal and worked pretty good.
These seals really should overhang the top of the steering head and come down about 1/8 inch to keep water from getting in so easily.




 
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