Re-Mounting front Wheel


11 replies to this topic
  • dl19

Posted June 24, 2007 - 07:56 PM

#1

I searched and could not find the answer on this. I saw/read somewhere on re-mounting your front wheel. It covered things like a cerain order to do things including spinning the wheel, pushing against the forks, and tighten and loosen the re-tighten the bolts in a certain order. The premise was it caused the front wheel to be centered and true when you finally tightend all bolts. I know this is all messed up but any help would be appreciated.

  • xrmarty

Posted June 24, 2007 - 08:19 PM

#2

which bike? do you have the owner's manual?

  • dl19

Posted June 25, 2007 - 12:12 PM

#3

This applied to any bike. Yes I have the manual, but there are all kinds of tricks and techniques that the manual will never cover. Just asking no worries if no one has the link or info.

  • WGP

Posted June 25, 2007 - 12:26 PM

#4

Basically, you install the axle, put the large nut on and tighten it hand tight, NOW, push down on the forks and I usually apply the front brake too..
Then torque the axle nut, then the pinch bolts last.
What will happen if you don't do this is the forks will be closer together at the bottom and bind up when your railing down the trail and they are not straight up and down.


Here's what Factory Connection says:

"When installing your forks torque the triple clamp pinch bolts to the manufacturer’s specifications (generally 15-16 foot lbs.) After you have installed the front wheel and slide the axle through, push down on the handlebars a few times to insure the axle lugs are seated squarely on the axle before tightening the axle pinch bolts. Improper installation can cause binding in the forks and harshness/stiffness in fork action. "

  • SID013

Posted June 25, 2007 - 01:57 PM

#5

Hiya, This was in the latest edition of the Australian Dirt Action Magazine. Hope its what you are looking for.

Posted Image

Cheers from Oz.

  • dl19

Posted June 25, 2007 - 07:19 PM

#6

Yeah that was pretty much it. Thanks for the info. The manual says the same thing, but the explanation of why and how makes it nice. Thanks again.

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  • clark4131

Posted June 27, 2007 - 01:53 PM

#7

Here's how I do mine...

Mount the wheel with the axle through the pinch bolts without the axle nut tight at all, but with the unthreaded end flush. While looking at the front of the bike, tighten only the left-most pinch bolt to 17ft/lbs. Take the bike off the rack, apply the front brake and cycle the suspension 7-10 times using the majority of your body weight. Eyeball the front wheel to make sure things aren't obviously screwy, tighten the left pinch bolts, alternating between the two until you hit a consistent 17ft/lbs for both. Repeat on the right side, then tighten the axle nut, go ride...SC

  • dl19

Posted June 27, 2007 - 05:48 PM

#8

LESSONS LEARNED!!! I just finished mounting a new Dunlop 756 to replace my stocker 739. This is what I found on riding some fairly fast back roads with hard surface and loose 2-3" sand over hard surface. Decent flat corners with good traction material in center and sides and some fairly straight road in between. Running 14 miles in 16 minutes.

First remount procedure: Left all pinch bolts loose, tightened axle nut, cycled/compressed forks numerous times, then tightened right pinch bolts then left pinch bolts. Bike had crazy high speed wobble even under accelaration and decelaration. While cruising mid 5th gear it was freaking scarry a couple times. Corners were good but it would dip or straighten and back would kick out regular.

Second remount Procedure: Loosened all bolts, but just finger tightened axle nut, cycled/compressed forks numerous times, tightened right pinch bolts, cycled/compressed forks a few more times, tightened axle nut, cycled again then left pinch bolts. Bike had some/more thenb the 739 tire high speed wobble a few times while cruising but corners were smooth with no sudden dips or rises from the front end. NOTICEABLY MORE STABLE!!!!

Now I just hope it is the tire difference that is causing the high speed increase in wobble. The 756 is a better turning tire on hard pack, and amazingly better in the softer and thicker areas.

  • GlennR

Posted November 16, 2012 - 06:25 PM

#9

Here's how I do mine...

Mount the wheel with the axle through the pinch bolts without the axle nut tight at all, but with the unthreaded end flush. While looking at the front of the bike, tighten only the left-most pinch bolt to 17ft/lbs. Take the bike off the rack, apply the front brake and cycle the suspension 7-10 times using the majority of your body weight. Eyeball the front wheel to make sure things aren't obviously screwy, tighten the left pinch bolts, alternating between the two until you hit a consistent 17ft/lbs for both. Repeat on the right side, then tighten the axle nut, go ride...SC



This is an old thread, but exactly the info I was looking for. :thumbsup:


btw, What does the axle nut actually do? It seems like the pinch bolts secure the alxe on both sides.

Edited by GlennR, November 16, 2012 - 06:29 PM.


  • MANIAC998

Posted November 17, 2012 - 03:47 AM

#10

Glenn, the axle nut really doesn't do much. It's on there because the lawyers want it there! Double or even triple redundancy, when it comes to items such as this is the norm.

  • MaxPower

Posted November 17, 2012 - 05:19 AM

#11

Having your forks lined up so they compress parallel is so important.
I had just bought a new stupid 250f in 01 or 02 whenever they first came out.
As as kid I would buy a new bike, take it apart to grease and tighten everything. As a busy adult, I checked the tires, oil and air filter , adjust the bars and go out there.
New bike, 3 laps on it I pin it though the SX whoop section and the next thing I knew the paramedics are standing over me not knowing where I was.

Apparently I ate it bad and I didn't know why, I've been through those whoops a millions times.
A month later with my shoulder healing I was pulling the forks. I loosened the pinch bolts on the axle and they sprung out almost 1/4 inch. The kid at the dealer just jammed my front wheel on and tightened the bolts . Never attempting to push on the forks and line up the stroke. So my forks compressed , they bound and I hit the ground And broke my shoulder.
So take the time to line up the forks. You don't need a broken shoulder. I always hated that bike

  • mikewrf18

Posted December 03, 2012 - 10:15 AM

#12

Having your forks lined up so they compress parallel is so important.
I had just bought a new stupid 250f in 01 or 02 whenever they first came out.
As as kid I would buy a new bike, take it apart to grease and tighten everything. As a busy adult, I checked the tires, oil and air filter , adjust the bars and go out there.
New bike, 3 laps on it I pin it though the SX whoop section and the next thing I knew the paramedics are standing over me not knowing where I was.

Apparently I ate it bad and I didn't know why, I've been through those whoops a millions times.
A month later with my shoulder healing I was pulling the forks. I loosened the pinch bolts on the axle and they sprung out almost 1/4 inch. The kid at the dealer just jammed my front wheel on and tightened the bolts . Never attempting to push on the forks and line up the stroke. So my forks compressed , they bound and I hit the ground And broke my shoulder.
So take the time to line up the forks. You don't need a broken shoulder. I always hated that bike


Not to mention you can damage your fork seals. Don't ask me how I know! :rolleyes:




 
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