stainless steel oil filter or paper???


31 replies to this topic
  • dmoney1074

Posted November 14, 2007 - 02:26 PM

#21

Grayracer.... where are you??? I've seen you post a bunch of technical info on this before...

  • byggd

Posted November 14, 2007 - 02:54 PM

#22

I bought my 01 WR 426 used and when I went top change the filter, i noticed there was a stainless steel filter behind the cover. Are there other brands of pleated SS filters? It is pleated. I put in a new ss filter that is not pleated but looked okay to me. I will try to post a pic.

Thanks

The 426 uses a different filter than the 450. I think the 450 uses a paper filter stock where the 426 came stock with that looks like a very fine metal mesh with pleats.

-Don

  • RickSanson

Posted November 14, 2007 - 05:19 PM

#23

Have a look at most general aviation aircraft engines...

No filter only screen...

  • risktaker

Posted November 14, 2007 - 06:06 PM

#24

Thanks for the response. I cleaned it and it looks like new. So now I have 2 SS filters. Good to go. Thanks again.

  • JVP

Posted November 19, 2007 - 01:03 AM

#25

My first Yamaha was a 92 Warrior. It had a steel mesh oil filter. The Dealer said it was reusable and should be good for 10 Oil Changes. I replaced it as needed. It never had a problem. When I bought my 04 WR450 it came with a paper filter. However, it was identical in size as the Warrior filter. When I questioned the mechanics at the Dealer, they said they switched over to paper because it took more time to clean the metal filter than just replacing it. On the Shop side, time is money and mechanics want to work fast. On the Parts side there is a big mark up. I now use the Scotts in both my WR450and YFZ450. I change the old myself, so there is no time-money issues. I do burn up a can carb cleaner, but overhaul the results and cost are worth it.
I think the Scott filter is a good product. With the 450 cc line needing oil changes often, I do not worries about the filter failing or not working.

  • stillsun

Posted November 24, 2007 - 07:46 PM

#26

Using a CRT stainless here in the YZ, paper in the 600 since I haven't found stainless for it.

For those who say it's hard/takes to long to clean the stainless, maybe they are doing it wrong. A little carb cleaner and a good rinse under the faucet gets it nice and clean and looking like new, then I spray it out one more time with carb cleaner and let it dry before putting back in... I do other things on the bike for maintenance while it dries, no biggie and I'm not adding to the massive landfills of oil filters and hard to recycle junk.

Go stainless.

J

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  • quicksilver

Posted November 26, 2007 - 09:44 AM

#27

I saw the ad for a Stainless Steel oil filter (Scots Performance) which the manufacturer claims cleans down to 30um . I had worked in an industry that utilizes particulate measurements in this arena and I am not convinced what-so-ever that 30um is an effective level of filtration.

Dust particulate is not measurable in that "dust" can be most anything airborne from 60um to sub-micron particles. However many industries utilize metal powder that is 2 micron and less!!!! Paper, if designed correctly would easily filter 2um particles. That being said, is it ideal to filter to a 30 micron level or filter to the lowest level of filtration possible?

I have an engineer friend that I posed this question to and he spoke of the exact same filter issue (co-incidence caused me to post this!)..... There is no way in Hell I would use that filter. It is a good idea in that one could clean the filter but in a motor that is in any manner new or would shave during it's operation, such a filter would be a very poor idea. However, if the motor was very well broken in, it may pay to have this cost savings (a "beater bike", perhaps?). To use this filter in a motor that is below 10,000K would be too risky.

  • JVP

Posted November 26, 2007 - 07:15 PM

#28

Wow! What is that all about:confused:

  • stillsun

Posted November 27, 2007 - 07:18 AM

#29

I saw the ad for a Stainless Steel oil filter (Scots Performance) which the manufacturer claims cleans down to 30um . I had worked in an industry that utilizes particulate measurements in this arena and I am not convinced what-so-ever that 30um is an effective level of filtration.

Dust particulate is not measurable in that "dust" can be most anything airborne from 60um to sub-micron particles. However many industries utilize metal powder that is 2 micron and less!!!! Paper, if designed correctly would easily filter 2um particles. That being said, is it ideal to filter to a 30 micron level or filter to the lowest level of filtration possible?

I have an engineer friend that I posed this question to and he spoke of the exact same filter issue (co-incidence caused me to post this!)..... There is no way in Hell I would use that filter. It is a good idea in that one could clean the filter but in a motor that is in any manner new or would shave during it's operation, such a filter would be a very poor idea. However, if the motor was very well broken in, it may pay to have this cost savings (a "beater bike", perhaps?). To use this filter in a motor that is below 10,000K would be too risky.


The average paper does is higher (it will let by the 40, 50, up to around 90 on the first pass).....I'll take the absolute (guaranteed if you will?) 30 over that any day of the week.

  • RickSanson

Posted November 27, 2007 - 02:27 PM

#30

Let me repeat myself...

Most general aviation engines use (or have used since Orville and Wilbur) brass screens to remove particulates from the oil. These engines were designed with a the less is more mentality. Less complexity means fewer things to go wrong which improves reliability. Reliability is everything in aviation. In an airplane ya just can't pull off the trail and call momma to ride the quad to come and drag ya home.

If I can fly over the Canadian and Alaskan bush with a mesh screen oil filter that was designed 100 years ago I can ride 20 miles from my truck on my 2007 WR450F with a Scotts SS oil filter...

  • splitpunk

Posted November 30, 2007 - 06:56 AM

#31

I run stainless no problom. even if i bought a new stainless filter every year it would be cheaper than buying one a week at 52 weeks a year. and I spray my filter out and blow it clean and have never had a problem. + it is better for the land fill issue in california. because I know you all take your filter to the dealer to get rid of it for you right!

  • Tough Guy

Posted December 06, 2007 - 07:43 PM

#32

I have an SS filter too. It makes sense to use one...




 
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