Which three of these chains is the best for the money


33 replies to this topic
  • CaptainKnobby

Posted June 04, 2007 - 10:08 AM

#1

Out of these three chains..... D.I.D, Renthal, RK,.......Which is the best one to get for the money and wear?

  • BergArabia

Posted June 04, 2007 - 10:11 AM

#2

not sure brand wise. But definitely you need an Oring or X ring chain.
I have an X-ring DID which I bought to replace the stocker before I even took the bike for the first ride.
That was 2 years ago. A couple of adjustments early in its life is all that it has needed.. :thumbsup:

  • 00YZ426FMRCD

Posted June 04, 2007 - 10:53 AM

#3

My vote would be for the RK - O-ring or X-Ring

  • grayracer513

Posted June 04, 2007 - 11:36 AM

#4

My answer would be the Renthal, sort of.

The Renthal R1 Gold O-ring chain is made for Renthal by Regina. It's a very good chain, but it costs about $15 more in most cases than the Regina ORN6, which is what the Renthal actually is.

The ORN6 is simply extraordinary. It is very free running for a sealed chain, costs about $60-65, and, if cared for in any reasonable manner at all, is nearly indestructible.

The one one my '03 is now over two years old, and still within wear limits, although it's getting close to being too long for me. In that time, it's been adjusted maybe 3 times total. All I do with it is wash it with Simple Green and a garden hose, let it dry, and spray it with Maxima Synthetic Chain Guard to lube the outer rollers and prevent rust.

There might be something better, I suppose, but why would I go looking for it?

  • CaptainKnobby

Posted June 04, 2007 - 11:42 AM

#5

Well!!! what is the advantage of going to an O-ring chain verses staying with a standard 520.

  • FLjoyride

Posted June 04, 2007 - 11:54 AM

#6

The extra O rings help keep the dirt out and the oil in (makes them last longer). There is a trade off, with the O ring chains you generally have a wider chain, slightly more mass, and apparently its not quite as free running as the standard chains.

  • CaptainKnobby

Posted June 04, 2007 - 12:05 PM

#7

The O-Ring chain is not so wide that it would scrub the changuide or rub the frame on the side would it?:thumbsup:

  • grayracer513

Posted June 04, 2007 - 01:16 PM

#8

The extra O rings help keep the dirt out and the oil in (makes them last longer). There is a trade off, with the O ring chains you generally have a wider chain, slightly more mass, and apparently its not quite as free running as the standard chains.

The ORN6 Regina O-ring chain is 3.3 ounces heavier than their comparable RX3 non-sealed chain, and is about 2mm wider overall. That's only .040" on each side.

The O-Ring chain is not so wide that it would scrub the changuide or rub the frame on the side would it?:thumbsup:

Normally, no, but some of the cheaper ones make up for low cost materials with additional mass, and those can be too wide.

  • CaptainKnobby

Posted June 04, 2007 - 01:38 PM

#9

Do you still clean the O-ring chain the same as you would a standard chain? eg.......wire brushing it,Taking it off ever so often to throughly clean it in solvent.

  • King_Air

Posted June 04, 2007 - 01:52 PM

#10

Do you still clean the O-ring chain the same as you would a standard chain? eg.......wire brushing it,Taking it off ever so often to throughly clean it in solvent.


You have to avoid the wire brush (use nylon) and most solvents are detrimental to rubber o-rings. As Grey stated above I use Simple Green, a grunge brush, and a garden hose, let it dry and spray it with chain lube. I am running an Regina ORN6 also.

Visit the ThumperTalk Store for the lowest prices on motorcycle / ATV parts and accessories - Guaranteed
  • Ga450owner

Posted June 04, 2007 - 02:35 PM

#11

Do you still clean the O-ring chain the same as you would a standard chain? eg.......wire brushing it,Taking it off ever so often to throughly clean it in solvent.




NO No Wire on ORing...ever ever ever and no Pressure washer either

BTW I am not a big supporter for oring/Xring chains on these MXbikes....More maint with oring/Xring, more HP drag off of the rear wheel and the problem of wider vs standard width chains......on a trail/woods/desert bike - sure but for pure MX NO NO ORing /Xring for me....

Here is my choice based on 3 years of using this combo with great results and little wear/streching:

My #1 choice is the DID ERT2 non oring chain. I have been getting close to 1.5 riding/racing seasons with this chain and Ironman Stainless Steel Sprockets. This is the lightest chain on the mkt and phenomenal wear...I am not a fan of mud riding so this works for me.

I use clean chain lube from both Belray and Silkolene and I use a pressure washer to blow all used lube and grime away and off chain every time....no problems period:thumbsup:

  • grayracer513

Posted June 04, 2007 - 04:42 PM

#12

Do you still clean the O-ring chain the same as you would a standard chain? eg.......wire brushing it,Taking it off ever so often to throughly clean it in solvent.

Uh, No.

All I do with it is wash it with Simple Green and a garden hose, let it dry, and spray it with Maxima Synthetic Chain Guard to lube the outer rollers and prevent rust.



  • grayracer513

Posted June 04, 2007 - 09:49 PM

#13

....More maint with oring/Xring, more HP drag off of the rear wheel and the problem of wider vs standard width chains......on a trail/woods/desert bike - sure but for pure MX NO NO ORing /Xring for me....

>Can you explain what you mean by "more maintenance"?

> Do you have any data to support your contention that any sgnificant horsepower is lost in an O-ring chain?

> Do you honestly think that the 2mm (.080") extra width causes any problems?

  • TeamPrecisionIT

Posted June 05, 2007 - 01:56 AM

#14

Significant horsepower lost, depends on who you ask. Personally, on my 2003 R6 I ran a test at a dyno one day (same dyno of course with no number tweaking) and ran at 90hp with a non o-ring chain and 93.5 with an o-ring chain. So no, it isn't an incredible number for say a street rider, but it is a significant number for a racebike and you are trying to eek the last few tenths of hp that you can from it. And yes, in some applications (Supermoto for example with the wider rear rims to accomodate street rubber) 2mm-5mm can be a problem. Maintenance is a little more delicate (you have to make sure you don't mess up those damn o-rings) with an oring chain, where as with a non o-ring you can just spray it with solvent/kerosene/pressure washer or whatever and then apply lube after scrubbing her clean. Just one guy's experiences/opinions in this post, I can be wrong.

Damian

  • Mutu

Posted June 05, 2007 - 02:09 AM

#15

Just from my experience -

I currently run a DID X-ring "520ATV" chain on my 450 and although it is the strongest chain I have ever used, it is also the heaviest by far.

I can definately notice the power loss by using this heavy chain on my bike.

http://www.didchain.com/specs.htm

  • grayracer513

Posted June 05, 2007 - 11:10 AM

#16

Significant horsepower lost, depends on who you ask. Personally, on my 2003 R6 I ran a test at a dyno one day (same dyno of course with no number tweaking) and ran at 90hp with a non o-ring chain and 93.5 with an o-ring chain. So no, it isn't an incredible number for say a street rider, but it is a significant number for a racebike and you are trying to eek the last few tenths of hp that you can from it. And yes, in some applications (Supermoto for example with the wider rear rims to accomodate street rubber) 2mm-5mm can be a problem. Maintenance is a little more delicate (you have to make sure you don't mess up those damn o-rings) with an oring chain, where as with a non o-ring you can just spray it with solvent/kerosene/pressure washer or whatever and then apply lube after scrubbing her clean.

So you gained 3+ hp with the O-ring chain? That's news. Here's a test on a bike a bit more suitable for comparison to a YZF:

http://www.thumperta...520#post4092520

The width of most of the sealed chains is not an issue on any of the YZ models I'm aware of outside of the SM example. As far as maintenance is concerned, I don't really find a need to do any more to it than what I listed above: Wash it off and lube it. One of the things that makes that work is finding the right lube. I selected Maxima Synthetic Chain Guard based on these criteria: It has to be very low tackiness, so as not to collect dirt; It has to stay on and do a decent job of lubing the chain and preventing rust; and also, it has to wash off with the cleaning agent I use, which in this case is Simple Green. Once you find that combination, there isn't a reason to do any more to the chain than that. It simply doesn't need it.

Just from my experience -

I currently run a DID X-ring "520ATV" chain on my 450 and although it is the strongest chain I have ever used, it is also the heaviest by far.

I can definately notice the power loss by using this heavy chain on my bike.

http://www.didchain.com/specs.htm

That's about the same weight as the Regina ORN6, only about 2 ounces heavier than the "Super NZ" non O-ring chain listed. Feel it? OK, but I don't think so?

  • NM_KDX200

Posted June 05, 2007 - 12:54 PM

#17

I have an X-ring DID which I bought to replace the stocker before I even took the bike for the first ride.
That was 2 years ago. A couple of adjustments early in its life is all that it has needed.. :thumbsup:


Have you changed sprockets under that same chain or are you still running the same sprockets too?

  • tnl

Posted June 05, 2007 - 03:39 PM

#18

more maintenance"?



> Do you honestly think that the 2mm (.080") extra width causes any problems?


What if one does not properly align their chain? Does the extra width of the chain become more of a problem than a properly aligned chain? .080" doesn't sound like much but it might be if a chain is not adjusted properly? I would bet that many people out there still use the owners manual method for adjusting chains (like me) which probably results in excess chain/sprocket wear? I have some wear on my Renthal chain on the outside of it that is raising my concern for possibly purchasing a new one but I can't find any specs that rate that kind of wear? I've had no sucess in the procedures listed here on T.T. on different adjustment methods so I've fallen back to the above procedure? I might spend the $30 for the aftermarket chain adjuster tool with a laser?

  • grayracer513

Posted June 05, 2007 - 04:59 PM

#19

What if one does not properly align their chain? Does the extra width of the chain become more of a problem than a properly aligned chain? .080" doesn't sound like much but it might be if a chain is not adjusted properly? I would bet that many people out there still use the owners manual method for adjusting chains (like me) which probably results in excess chain/sprocket wear? I have some wear on my Renthal chain on the outside of it that is raising my concern for possibly purchasing a new one but I can't find any specs that rate that kind of wear? I've had no sucess in the procedures listed here on T.T. on different adjustment methods so I've fallen back to the above procedure? I might spend the $30 for the aftermarket chain adjuster tool with a laser?

It's still only .040" on each side. It is that much closer, but only that much.

Exterior chain wear hasn't really ever been a factor because chains have never been expected to last this long. The top edge of the outer plates on my Regina is worn down nearly to the level of the inners as a result of dragging through dirt and sand in the lower guide. For a while, I was beginning to think that would be the only reason I would have for replacing the thing, but it has actually started to get close to my wear limit.

The laser is neat. Motion Pro also makes a simple gizmo that clamps onto the rear sprocket with the chain in place and uses a pointer rod to show alignment.

  • tnl

Posted June 05, 2007 - 05:13 PM

#20

Come to think of it, the wear is probably from the chain dragging too since my subframe isn't all chewed up... Good point!





Related Content

 
x

Join Our Community!

Even if you don't want to post, registered members get access to tools that make finding & following the good stuff easier.

If you enjoyed reading about "" here in the ThumperTalk archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join ThumperTalk today!

The views and opinions expressed on this page are strictly those of the author, and have not been reviewed or approved by ThumperTalk.