dr350 suspension settings


14 replies to this topic
  • jahn

Posted May 28, 2007 - 05:33 PM

#1

Hey guys,

I just bought a 1999 dr350se.. Its a daily commuter pretty much, never touches the dirt. I just put some 90/10 street tires front and back which have helped the stability on the pavement quite a bit. And I replaced my chain and both sprokets (went to 15/44 for a little more bite) which were beat up pretty badly from the previous owner... Just curious if anyone has some suspension advice?

Right now, the front forks (top and bottom) at 5 clicks from in all the way, but ive noticed a lot of bouncing on the front tire on uneven pavement (can get a bit hairy if you hit a bump at full lean).. Which makes me think my bound settings are ok but my rebound is a bit too light? Does that make sense?

And I have not even touched the rear settings yet, nor do I know how to adjust them. :)

I should probably invest in a manual (tell me to rtfm, its ok).

My goal is just a fun little semi'motard wheelie machine, any help will be greatly appreciated.

Thanks much,
John

ps: I noticed also that someone possibly drilled like (5) 1/2 inch holes in the top of the airbox. Could this cause any problems or did they do me a favor? I have noticed a flat spot right as you start to crack the throttle open, but its smooth as butter once its wide open, tho it could just be the nature of the beast right?!?

  • pookiebear

Posted May 29, 2007 - 08:54 AM

#2

Suspension for street, if you set them as hard as they will go it will still be too soft by a little. The 5 holes are ok if the jetting is on. the off idle stumble can be several things. the needle is in wrong position, float height is too low or high, or main jet is too big. Not fun for sure. Mine was the float height. It was too high causing a rich condition when the throttle was cracked open. Hope this helps.

  • kktos

Posted June 01, 2007 - 01:17 AM

#3

pookie

do I have to understand that having done the air mod only is not enough ?
I also have to change the carb needle ?

thanks in advance.


---
just re-read http://kientech.com/AirBoxMod.htm
<<Performing either the rejetting or air box mod alone will make your bike run worse>>

okay, so I __have__ to do the jet mod too.

/thierry

  • kojack

Posted June 01, 2007 - 09:28 AM

#4

OK John,
On the bottom of the forks under a black plug is the compression settings for the forks. Give those a few turns either way and see how that works. Keep a pen and paper handy so you can take notes on how the different settings react.
The large screw on the top is for all intensive purposes the "preload". Really though, all that does is compress the spring if you turn it in or the opposite. All it really does is change the ride height of the front.
Just FYI, you may want to pull the large nut at the top of the fork and check the amount of fork oil. This sounds strange but the DR's have a tendency to run a little shy of the recommended amount of oil in the forks.
On the rear shok is a resevoir. That is the compression setting. If you have a dirt model shock, on the right bottom of the shock is a screw that adjusts the rebound.
As far as the jetting, if you hae not already done so, go up a size on the main. IMHO, I would do the airbox mod and put in a 140. It's not hard and while you are there, do the t-vent mod also. If you don't know what that is, just ask and I can lead you through it.
Good luck and let us know if you need any other help.
Mike

  • TX-SANDMAN

Posted June 01, 2007 - 09:47 PM

#5

i have had several drs's ... the oil in the forks and shock is so light you can turn every clicker there is in all the way to the right and it will make a small difference. place 20w in your forks and 15w in your shock for the real deal - you will love it.

  • mxrob

Posted June 02, 2007 - 06:35 AM

#6

place 20w in your forks and 15w in your shock for the real deal - you will love it.


:ride: :thumbsup: :ride: :) Holy back ache dude!

  • jcalis

Posted June 02, 2007 - 10:42 AM

#7

I may be wrong but on street DR350's the rear shock compression setting is on the remote resevoir. Dirt Dr350's have the same compression adjuster and also a rebound (tension) adjuster at the bottom of the shock on right side.

  • jahn

Posted June 03, 2007 - 12:17 PM

#8

Thanks much for the input guys, I went all the way hard on all 4 adjustments front and back just for giggles and it actually feels a lot better. I'll look into heavier front fork oil too.

I thought I had the street model, but I do have a compression adjuster at the bottom right of my rear shock.

I believe the previous owner did do the airbox mod and rejetted it. I think fine tuning that might be my next task in familarizing myself with the bike.

Question for you kojack, the top screws on the forks: if its just ment for the fork height.. It would make sense that going all the way hard would raise them up correct? If it doesnt sound too loco, I may back that one all the way out.. and leave the rest at hard. Does that make sense at all?

  • kojack

Posted June 03, 2007 - 01:34 PM

#9

Question for you kojack, the top screws on the forks: if its just ment for the fork height.. It would make sense that going all the way hard would raise them up correct? If it doesnt sound too loco, I may back that one all the way out.. and leave the rest at hard. Does that make sense at all?



It's supposed to be a perload adjuster but it's really isn't much of one.
When you screw it in, it compresses the spring and makes it shorter and out takes all the preload off and makes the spring longerand makes the front end really bounce alot.
If you are looking for ride height, try and shorten the front and make the bike really plant in the corners. Lower the fork tubes in the clamps 1/2" then crank up on the compression setting on the bottom of the fork. This will lower the front end and really make it bite good and also allow you to play with the settings and see more of a difference.
Give it a shot. If you don't like it you can always raise them back up.
Mike

  • tonymorr

Posted June 11, 2007 - 01:57 PM

#10

OK John,
On the bottom of the forks under a black plug is the compression settings for the forks. Give those a few turns either way and see how that works. Keep a pen and paper handy so you can take notes on how the different settings react.
The large screw on the top is for all intensive purposes the "preload". Really though, all that does is compress the spring if you turn it in or the opposite. All it really does is change the ride height of the front.
Just FYI, you may want to pull the large nut at the top of the fork and check the amount of fork oil. This sounds strange but the DR's have a tendency to run a little shy of the recommended amount of oil in the forks.
On the rear shok is a resevoir. That is the compression setting. If you have a dirt model shock, on the right bottom of the shock is a screw that adjusts the rebound.
As far as the jetting, if you hae not already done so, go up a size on the main. IMHO, I would do the airbox mod and put in a 140. It's not hard and while you are there, do the t-vent mod also. If you don't know what that is, just ask and I can lead you through it.
Good luck and let us know if you need any other help.
Mike


Ummm, it's my understanding that the '98 and '99 SE (street) models have the dirt model suspension. This appears to be true on my '98 SE model. Here is a relply I got from rekhill on the Maximum Suzuki forum.

rekhill wrote....."The factory owners manual for a 99 DR350SEX (probably the same for the 98) says the factory settings for both rebound & compression on the front forks are set at 5 clicks out from fully screwed in. Rebound is located at the top of the front forks & compression at the bottom.

The rear compression is located at the reservoir tank & the rebound at the bottom of the rear suspension. Factory setting are: Turn in the adjuster fully and turn it out 2 1/4 turns for rebound & 1 turn out for the compression."

I purposely searched over the winter to find a '98-'99 SE model and did find a nice one for $1200 bucks. I haven't been able to get the suspension where I like it yet. It seems to loose contact with the ground on rocky roads too easily. I'm planning to get Eibach springs front and rear and try the 15 and 20 wt oil suggested by DR'sarenotjunk. I'm happy with the motor. It's adeqate for my inteded use.

  • griffg

Posted November 27, 2009 - 09:57 AM

#11

Carrying on with the discussions about settings, does anybody know what pressure is supposed to be on the rear shock resevoir, and also by changing this pressure what effect does it have on the shock?

  • jcalis

Posted November 27, 2009 - 01:49 PM

#12

Suzuki quotes 142psi nitrogen in the manual. You can go up to 175psi if you wish, more pressure will make the shock feel stiffer.
Racetech calls for 175psi if you do their gold valve conversion on the DR350 shock.

  • griffg

Posted November 28, 2009 - 12:03 AM

#13

Thanks for the reply. Any reason for nitrogen rather than air, only asking as nirogen means specailist equipment whereas I have a shock pump that can do the job but means using air.

  • jcalis

Posted November 28, 2009 - 09:02 AM

#14

Nitrogen in dry (no water vapor) and inert. Water vapor in the shock will cause a big pressure increase when the shock heats up.
Find a local shop who can do the recharge for you. They usually charge ~15-$20.

  • michealmolach

Posted August 27, 2010 - 06:11 AM

#15

i have had several drs's ... the oil in the forks and shock is so light you can turn every clicker there is in all the way to the right and it will make a small difference. place 20w in your forks and 15w in your shock for the real deal - you will love it.


Fellow biker,
Just a wee question; How does one change the oil (for a change of 'w') in the shock? I couldn't see instructions in the manual. Is this just a job for the experts rather than the diy mechanic?
Thanks,
Mìcheal




 
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