Lessons learned greasing the 07


22 replies to this topic
  • FastRides

Posted May 06, 2007 - 09:47 PM

#1

Hey all, just wanted to share a few observations from greasing my 07 and thought the update might be helpful for my fellow newbies out there (if you're not familiar with this topic, read the FAQs and you'll understand why I'm writing a thread about greasing a brand new WR). I recently completed the swingarm and all associated linkage as well as the steering shaft (and it wasn't difficult at all). Here's what I saw:
1. Much like ARin's tutorial on the carb, Wrooster's thread on this subject was most excellent and quite helpful- many thanks to him for his efforts. http://www.thumperfaq.com/swingarm.htm
I had not done this before, so the pics gave me a lot more confidence as the needles started raining everywhere...
2. Not sure when Yamaha quit using the "string cheese" mentioned in Wrooster's thread, but the 07 did not have any of this, which made the task even easier.
3. Generally speaking, most major bolts were fairly dry (in serious need of grease) while most bearings were fair. In fact, the pivot shaft already had corrosion on it and the bike had only been wet (from washing) a handful of times (bike was only 3 months old). I would also rate the steering shaft and associated bearings as fair WRT factory greasing.
4. To help account for all the bearing needles, I used a small magnet mat (got one at SEARS) and placed my plastic cleaning container and paper towel on top- that way, none of the needles could bounce off my work bench on to the floor while in the cleaning and re-greasing process (i.e. the magnets in the mat quickly caught any fumbled needle). This worked well. :applause:
5. New guy mistake- got a little grease on the thread of the top bolt for the rear shock absorber and managed to strip it while applying the prescribed torque (bike was crippled for a week while I waited for the new $2 bolt to come from Yamaha). Doh! :applause: My wife really appreciated the irony as I had just explained what a torque wrench was for 3 hrs before this happened. Go figure.
6. Put it all back together, double-checked all torque settings and have been riding since with no problems.
That's it. This wasn't bad and I got to know my bike a lot better. Thanks again to Wrooster and TT for brining this issue to our attention- would have never guessed a new bike would need this work done right off the bat.
MG

  • xrmarty

Posted May 07, 2007 - 09:16 PM

#2

This wasn't bad and I got to know my bike a lot better.


This is the reason I tore into my bike when I was rejetting it, instead of letting someone else doing it. It really gave me a good idea how this bike was put together. My next project was greasing up all the linkages. However, I just recently had my suspension done at a local suspension shop.
They only charged my 60 or 70 bucks for it while they had the bike apart. It would have been much more if I came back later to have all the bearings/ linkages greased up.

Good write-up FastRides!

  • TWILES

Posted May 08, 2007 - 01:28 PM

#3

I feel you on the needles raining down. I traded for an '87 500 Quadracer when I was 15. Needless to say that Dad was superpissed. The swing-arm bearings were bad so I took it to my friend at his shop to fix it. I left it and when I got home they had BAD news. All the bearings in the linkage had poured onto the shop floor. That was 10 years ago and I dug around the other day and still found a couple needles under a bench. It cost me $300 and he didn't charge me labor. He just kept the profit off the parts. He didn't dick me either. I thought he did untill me showed me the order form. They had done this before. I have never greased my 05. Of all the quads I've had, the only thing I greased was the swing-arm bearings and bolt and it would squirt out when I put it back together. I always put a skim on the places where the bearing rode and that was it. The only bearings I ever had go bad were axle bearings. Once "I" replaced the swing-arm bearings and greased them, I never had to replace them. I never really rode in water but an MX track is hell on a quad and no problems.

  • WR_Dave

Posted May 08, 2007 - 07:14 PM

#4

First thing to do when you bring the bike home is to grease steering head, swingarm, linkage and wheel bearings. Don't forget the rear brake pivot either. I do the steering head every year and the rest every 2 months minimum. My '02 WR 426 had about 13 000 kms on it and I only replaced the original non sealed wheel bearings once. Again--- this is just my own, personal , for none else but me, method of maintaining my bike. I have to go put on my firesuit now so the flaming can begin. :applause: WR Dave

  • FastRides

Posted May 08, 2007 - 08:14 PM

#5

First thing to do when you bring the bike home is to grease steering head, swingarm, linkage and wheel bearings. Don't forget the rear brake pivot either. I do the steering head every year and the rest every 2 months minimum. My '02 WR 426 had about 13 000 kms on it and I only replaced the original non sealed wheel bearings once. Again--- this is just my own, personal , for none else but me, method of maintaining my bike. I have to go put on my firesuit now so the flaming can begin. :applause: WR Dave


Thanks for the feedback, Dave, though I can't imagine juggling those needles every two months. :p I was thinkin' more along the lines of 3-4 times/yr. Like anything else, I'm sure this procedure gets faster / more efficient with repetition.
Again, thanks for the input. I've already learned an incredible amount from TT, which helps since my last dirt bike was a classic yellow and black YZ80 way back in '78! :applause:

  • WR_Dave

Posted May 09, 2007 - 04:03 AM

#6

If you keep plenty of grease in the bearings the needles will stay in there and no juggling is needed. We ride in some fairly wet conditions so I do more maintenance. Drier climate can get away with alot less greasing. WR Dave.

  • Sycamore

Posted September 20, 2007 - 10:49 AM

#7

I tore apart my never ridden 07 450 and found MANY dry bearings. If you haven't done your bike yet..you need to NOW!! :thumbsup:

  • jpoehls

Posted September 20, 2007 - 06:10 PM

#8

Has anyone ever though of drilling these out and adding grease zerks where possible? Perhaps I am oversimplifying, but why wouldn't it be possible (yes, I know your going to let me have it now...give it to me good!):thumbsup:

  • chevytrkn1

Posted September 20, 2007 - 06:28 PM

#9

I greased all of mine up also while i was rejetting and other mods, The sterring head seemed like it had enough grease but the linkage and especially the rear brake pedal were almost dry. hard to beleive Yamaha cant squeeze another few ounces of grease into these areas. I ride mostly dry areas so i figure ill grease probabely twice a year.

Good info on TT.

  • clark4131

Posted September 20, 2007 - 06:45 PM

#10

Has anyone ever though of drilling these out and adding grease zerks where possible? Perhaps I am oversimplifying, but why wouldn't it be possible (yes, I know your going to let me have it now...give it to me good!):thumbsup:


Not gonna flame you 'cuz it's already been done. Somebody posted it a while back...SC

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  • Sycamore

Posted September 20, 2007 - 08:39 PM

#11

Not gonna flame you 'cuz it's already been done. Somebody posted it a while back...SC


A buddy of mine is doing it now on hes wr400

  • Kahuku Spoiled

Posted September 21, 2007 - 09:36 AM

#12

First thing to do when you bring the bike home is to grease steering head, swingarm, linkage and wheel bearings. Don't forget the rear brake pivot either. I do the steering head every year and the rest every 2 months minimum. My '02 WR 426 had about 13 000 kms on it and I only replaced the original non sealed wheel bearings once. Again--- this is just my own, personal , for none else but me, method of maintaining my bike. I have to go put on my firesuit now so the flaming can begin. :thumbsup: WR Dave


Dave, i inquired into pulling wheel bearings last week or so and was advised to just beat them out with a screw driver...bought the bearing kit but haven't done it yet...what is the best way to remove them? Thank you sir...Regards, KS

  • WR_Dave

Posted September 21, 2007 - 12:07 PM

#13

I use a bearing puller that adapts to a slide hammer, but I have spent over 20 years as a Heavy Equipment Mechanic and have a few tools in my collection that most people don't have. You can use a long punch to knock the bearings out from the opposite side of the wheel. I don't usually use a screw driver unless it is a previously damaged one. When I install the new bearings I take a pick tool and CAREFULLY pry the side seals off the bearing, put grease in the new bearing and then put the side seals back on. When installing the new bearings I lightly lube the outside of them to help them slide into place easier to avoid galling the hub material. I use a bearing driver to install them , but a large socket that is the same size or slightly smaller than the outside race of the bearing will do if you drive them in squarely. Good Luck and have fun learning to do bike maintenance on your own. :thumbsup: WR Dave

  • Kahuku Spoiled

Posted September 21, 2007 - 03:04 PM

#14

Thank you sir...am having fun learning how to be a bike mech...installed rad guards on my wife's WR250 yesterday after untwisting her forks and felt like I conquered the world!...simple pleasures :thumbsup:!...Regards, KS

  • WR_Dave

Posted September 21, 2007 - 03:54 PM

#15

Start with the small things and as the confidence grows so will the skills, and remember that TT is a priceless source of info. WR Dave.

  • SXP

Posted September 26, 2007 - 11:56 AM

#16

Finally got around to greasing the swingarm and linkage bearings of my 07. All the bearings were adequately lubed, but the bolts had started to rust, and one actually needed a sharp knock with a hammer to break it free.

  • mks yz

Posted January 01, 2008 - 09:25 PM

#17

A buddy of mine is doing it now on hes wr400

how did it go? , im thinking of doing the same to my 07 250t

  • beezer

Posted January 02, 2008 - 06:41 AM

#18

I have been told when you grease the seals with zerk fittings it pushes the seal lips out and they don't come back.

Then water and dirt can get in.

Cleaning them and greaseing the bearings is a good winter project.

  • WR_Dave

Posted January 02, 2008 - 04:25 PM

#19

I'm sure you can damage the seals if your not careful , but I don't use an air greaser and I only go till I hear the grease making the slightest popping sound at the seal lip. I have been doing this for over 20 years and have had no seal problems so far. Doing this service IS a good winter project , but I do mine every month during the ride season, as we have to ride through a fair bit of water on most rides and once a year won't cut it for me. I'm not telling anyone to do this much service , I'm just letting you guys know what I do and you can judge it from there for yourselves. :banghead: WR Dave.

  • SJMC_DON

Posted January 02, 2008 - 04:56 PM

#20

Yeah it's good practice to routinely lube and / or change your swingarm bearings... I know two guys last year that both ended up with their hands in a cast after/during changing out swingarm bearings :banghead:




 
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