Small Trailer tire pressure.


11 replies to this topic
  • carajean

Posted 20 April 2007 - 10:28 AM

#1

I have a small 4x7 trailer with wheel chock. Its a tractor supply company trailer( http://www.mytscstor...dTitle=CARRY-ON TRAILER™ EXPANDED METAL FLOOR UTILITY TRAILER ). I was wondering what the tire pressure should be at?? And is there a way to keep the trailer from bouncing so much?? I will be picking up a rm 125 this weekend and its a 3 hour drive each way so Im trying to make this trip as trouble free as possible.

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  • RhinofromWA

Posted 20 April 2007 - 10:55 AM

#2

Have you tried the suggested level printed on the side of the tire? :thumbsup:

  • lucky_logger6

Posted 20 April 2007 - 12:46 PM

#3

The recommended tire pressure is for the max load capacity. If you are near the max load of the tire then run the recommended PSI, however with one 125 and the trailer weight you probably don’t need the max pressure. With out knowing the total trailer weight, the tire size and load rating you cant calculate the needed pressure.

  • lucky_logger6

Posted 20 April 2007 - 01:07 PM

#4

http://www.thumperta...t=tire pressure

Here is a discussion that may help.

  • BlackBuzzard

Posted 20 April 2007 - 01:16 PM

#5

The question is a good one.

Most of us know inflating to max pressure with only the load of one or two dirt bikes on a trailer that rated for 2000pounds of cargo, results in a trailer that bounces considerably......these things only have leaf springs with no shocks.


So how far down from the sidewall marked tire pressure can one go? I've taken my 15" wheel single axel trailer down to 20 psi before the tire sidewalls even hinted at squating........I didnt haul at that pressure though, but I have towed at 27psi for a tire thats rated for 55psi max.

I dont think tire makers would touch this topic with a 10ft pole. Imagine a chart showing tire pressure values as a function of load.

BB

  • carajean

Posted 20 April 2007 - 02:18 PM

#6

The trailer tire size is 12". the recommended psi is 90. the trailer i have no idea how much that weighs. i just want a nice smooth ride with not a whole lot of bounces.

  • Trail Rider 7

Posted 20 April 2007 - 05:40 PM

#7

The trailer tire size is 12". the recommended psi is 90. the trailer i have no idea how much that weighs. i just want a nice smooth ride with not a whole lot of bounces.


Are you sure on the 90 psi?

I have a 14k trailer with e rated tires that only hold 80 psi at 3500 pounds.

  • Chickenhauler

Posted 20 April 2007 - 11:55 PM

#8

One thing to keep in mind, is that speed + low tire pressure = high internal tire carcass temperatures (premature failure)

This is exactly what caused the Ford-Firestone debacle of failed tires.

Ford was having a plethora of complaints about harsh ride on Explorer's, and their "fix" was to lower tire pressure, but this caused tire temps to rise, especially at speed, causing premature failure. Firestone got pimp-slapped, while it wasn't their fault, it was Ford's for not having the cajone's to tell the customer they didn't buy a Caddilac, but a SUV.

One way to help keep the tires from bouncing so much is to have them balanced-many times trailer tire/rim combo's are not balanced, and hop very badly-you'll be surprised how much they settle down after balancing.

  • BlackBuzzard

Posted 21 April 2007 - 09:44 AM

#9

One thing to keep in mind, is that speed + low tire pressure = high internal tire carcass temperatures (premature failure)

This is exactly what caused the Ford-Firestone debacle of failed tires.

Ford was having a plethora of complaints about harsh ride on Explorer's, and their "fix" was to lower tire pressure, but this caused tire temps to rise, especially at speed, causing premature failure. Firestone got pimp-slapped, while it wasn't their fault, it was Ford's for not having the cajone's to tell the customer they didn't buy a Caddilac, but a SUV.



Good points.

However would you inflate your 3/4ton truck's (assuming you have one) ten-ply, LT, load range E tires to the recommended pressure of 80 PSI for all driving? On washboards road with an empty truck the ride and slide will be maddening.


So where is the pressure compromize, if there is one? OEM's and tire makers never comment on this.


BB

  • Chickenhauler

Posted 21 April 2007 - 02:02 PM

#10

Good points.

However would you inflate your 3/4ton truck's (assuming you have one) ten-ply, LT, load range E tires to the recommended pressure of 80 PSI for all driving? On washboards road with an empty truck the ride and slide will be maddening.


So where is the pressure compromize, if there is one? OEM's and tire makers never comment on this.


BB


I keep mine aired to 80 PSI all the time, and it rides like crap loaded (1980 Chevy), but I don't use it for going to the movies, I only use it when I need to haul something-it's soooo much cheaper to take the car to the kids ball games.

If you ask a tire manufacturer, there is no compromise on tire pressure, it's all or nothing, since the tire was designed to operate at that pressure, and running it at a lower PSI creates a exponential rise in tire temps, and treadlife is greatly diminished. Lower PSI will cause the casing to flex more which can lead to premature cord failure.

If you don't need a tire that calls for that pressure, get a lighter truck, trailer, or tire that will ride better-HD tires are not designed for premium ride or comfort, their purpose is load carrying.

Carajean-have you hauled any weight on this trailer before, or is this the maiden run? One way to help prevent bouncing is to add some weight to the trailer-some concrete blocks (tie them down securely). The trailer's springs are designed to haul the rated capacity, and when underloaded, they produce a rough ride. Just like a HD truck, it will ride better when hauling closer to it's rated capacity than lightly loaded.

  • cleonard

Posted 21 April 2007 - 09:30 PM

#11

There is a lot of good discussion here, but I feel that most of it only applies to the larger tires. On small trailer tires like this, I have found that running them at pretty high pressure makes them last longer. Go for 80 to 90.

  • MX813

Posted 21 April 2007 - 09:36 PM

#12

I Just like a HD truck, it will ride better when hauling closer to it's rated capacity than lightly loaded.


So true...my chev hd2500 rides much better with a big load in the back than empty

My 30' trailer, max tire pressure is 60lbs.

I used to have a 4x8 landscape trailer w/15" tires. Empty, any bump...darn thing like to hop, but I kept tire pressure at max load specs




 
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