Clutch Plates/Basket Replacment Advice?


8 replies to this topic
  • NDC

Posted April 03, 2007 - 05:32 AM

#1

Hi all,

Going to be putting a Hinson clutch basket and new plates in my 06 450F this weekend. Although I have done suspension, valves and piston replacements before, I have never done clutch work.

I have the common tools (torque wrench, etc), and the service manual, but am just looking for any "tribal knowledge" from the more experienced.

Such as:
Do I have to replace the lock washer with a new one? Looks like it will be a week or so to get a new one?

Is all the mounting hardware standard thread (i.e. nothing to turn to the right to loosen, etc)?

Is the "special clutch tool" shown and used in the manual a must have?

I think I've read some about having to drill out some rivets that are holding the stock basket on? Is that correct or did I miss-read something.

Any type of special break-in procedure?

I have been told that soaking everything in oil overnight before installing helps seat the clutch initially.

Anything else anyone has to offer will be greatly appreciated.

:bonk:

  • grayracer513

Posted April 03, 2007 - 07:59 AM

#2

To answer your questions in order:

> Best practice, yes. However, you don't strictly have to. When you fold it back up on reassembly, bend it in a new place.

> Yes, all right hand threads.

> No. If you own an air or electric impact wrench, you can hold the clutch boss by hand with a rag. You can also place the transmission in 4th and put a board through the spokes across the swing arm (use hand tools if doing this).

> Yep. The instructions that come with the basket are pretty clear and well written. The primary drive gear/cushion unit gets transferred to the new basket, and it's riveted from the factory. It's not a tough job to do. Be very certain to use red Loc-Tite on the supplied bolts and torque them as recommended. I like to stake them a little, too.

> Sort of. Don't do any clutch burning, rocky hill climbs or 3rd gear slipper starts until after the first hour.

> Soaking is ideal, but simply coating the plates completely with fresh oil is adequate.

Watch out for the thrust washer between the basket and the boss. It is splined to match the main shaft, and has to be removed before the basket will come off, and has to be placed back on the splines before the boss can be installed.

  • dwnlowx

Posted April 03, 2007 - 08:08 AM

#3

i would buy the clutch basket tool just because it really works and it will be a fast switch instead of trying to break it loose with the wrong tools

id say change your oil right after your first few rides and get a magnetic drain plug to catch some of the stuff

and you have to drill out your gear on the back of the hub it sucks but its easy

  • dwnlowx

Posted April 03, 2007 - 08:15 AM

#4

> No. If you own an air or electric impact wrench, you can hold the clutch boss by hand with a rag. You can also place the transmission in 4th and put a board through the spokes across the swing arm (use hand tools if doing this).


thats a great way right there i wish i knew that

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  • NDC

Posted April 03, 2007 - 06:26 PM

#5

First of all thanks to you guys for the replies.

Second, I tore into it this afternoon was was pleased to find it suprisingly easy (probably easier than changing sprockets/chains and definately easier than a valve job).

But, I'm not sure if I should be concerned that the factory clutch basket came out with no more force than a loose bolt. I didn't have, need or use the special tool.....

Also, here is a picture of the wear on the flanges of the basket:

http://members.cox.n...ee/DSC01417.JPG

Based on the manual, it should be replaced right? I'm getting a new one, and this will be the third clutch pack going into this bike, but the basket is stock. I'm thinking this is one of those "I should do it now while I'm in there" deals right?

Also, can stock rivets be pressed out? They look like they were orginally pressed in. I have a press and it looks like that would be much easier and clearner than drilling them out.

  • grayracer513

Posted April 03, 2007 - 07:48 PM

#6

The rivets absolutely cannot be pressed out, no. Are you sure you understand how a rivet works? The heads on one side are larger than the shank to begin with, and the other end is hammered or pressed to expend it larger than the shank. It would be the same as trying to press the head of a bolt through the hole it goes in.

Drilling the rivets off from the back side is actually a piece of cake. Use a drill larger than the rivet shank, and drill just until the heads come off. Then, tap the rest of the rivet through with a pin punch. Nothing to it.

  • NDC

Posted April 04, 2007 - 10:30 AM

#7

The rivets absolutely cannot be pressed out, no. Are you sure you understand how a rivet works? The heads on one side are larger than the shank to begin with, and the other end is hammered or pressed to expend it larger than the shank. It would be the same as trying to press the head of a bolt through the hole it goes in.

Drilling the rivets off from the back side is actually a piece of cake. Use a drill larger than the rivet shank, and drill just until the heads come off. Then, tap the rest of the rivet through with a pin punch. Nothing to it.


Thanks gray.

Set it up on a Bridgeport with a center drill and it was a piece of cake.

  • grayracer513

Posted April 04, 2007 - 11:29 AM

#8

Wow. I set mine up on a board on the shop floor and used a Makita with a cobalt drill. It was easy, too.

  • NDC

Posted April 05, 2007 - 06:25 AM

#9

All back together right now. Took most of an evening, but that's just due to taking my time, etc. Could easily due it in 1/3 of the time if I had to do it again. Definately like the machined clutch basket from Hinson better than the stock one, hoping it works better too.

The real test will be this evening when I take it out.





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