Grease on Forkseal??


13 replies to this topic
  • Arnaud

Posted April 02, 2007 - 09:49 AM

#1

Guys, I've been browsing many of the threads about Fork Seals, but didn't come across anyone who applies grease between the fork seal and the seal cover.

According to the WR450 Service Manual, this is the standard procedure:
Posted Image

Anyone any suggestions??

Thanks,
Arnaud.

  • waynus

Posted April 02, 2007 - 10:59 AM

#2

Yep, me and a few others here do this.
Use a waterproof grease.
It reduces stiction and helps stop grit getting into the seals.
I haven't had a seal go yet.
Clean out with a rag and small screwdriver every 3rd rided replenish (best to remove the fork guards to do this)

  • SJMC_DON

Posted April 02, 2007 - 12:10 PM

#3

Yep, me and a few others here do this.
Use a waterproof grease.
It reduces stiction and helps stop grit getting into the seals.
I haven't had a seal go yet.
Clean out with a rag and small screwdriver every 3rd rided replenish (best to remove the fork guards to do this)


Disagree....... Grease will actually trap more dirt and make it easier to penetrate the seal.

If you ride or race more than once before washing the bike, make sure you wipe dried mud or dirt off your lower (inner) fork tube before going back out for a second moto or race or ride. Pop your wipers or dust seals after washing the bike and clean them out.

It's all a matter preference, waynus could be onto something especially if it works for him but I have never put grease inbetween the dust seal and grease seal and rarely do I replace fork seals more than once a year and I'd like to think that I ride and race a lot:thumbsup:

  • specialk6r

Posted April 02, 2007 - 04:00 PM

#4

Disagree....... Grease will actually trap more dirt and make it easier to penetrate the seal....but I have never put grease inbetween the dust seal and grease seal


So what you're saying is that you're just speculating?

I'm a believer in greasing the seals. It says to in the manual, plus common sense tells me it's a good idea. Dirt will always get under the dust seal - you can't prevent that without seal-savers - and once it's in there most if it is staying in. It just makes sense to use a little grease to hold the dirt in suspension rather than letting it tumble around until it wedges under the oil seal.

I got the tip from a couple of older riders that live for the mudd. I'd like to hear if anyone who's been doing it for a long time has experienced the problems SMJC suggested.

  • WR_Jason

Posted April 02, 2007 - 04:12 PM

#5

Also, most seales with springs around them to hold presure advise packing the seals with grease to prevent a hard shot from dislodging the spring.
On a dirt bike, I belive water is as big a threat to the fork oil as dirt is to the seal. A good water proof grease is a great idea.
JG

  • SJMC_DON

Posted April 02, 2007 - 05:34 PM

#6

So what you're saying is that you're just speculating?

I'm a believer in greasing the seals. It says to in the manual, plus common sense tells me it's a good idea. Dirt will always get under the dust seal - you can't prevent that without seal-savers - and once it's in there most if it is staying in. It just makes sense to use a little grease to hold the dirt in suspension rather than letting it tumble around until it wedges under the oil seal.

I got the tip from a couple of older riders that live for the mudd. I'd like to hear if anyone who's been doing it for a long time has experienced the problems SMJC suggested.


I guess our common sense differs but since you quoted me out of context I will state that I am not speculating but am going off of my own experience, like I say.. If it works for others great, maybe I'll even try it :bonk:

  • specialk6r

Posted April 02, 2007 - 08:08 PM

#7

SJMC, sorry, I didn't catch where you mentioned you're own experience with greasing seals.

What's your take on seal-savers? I don't see them on many bikes in the GNCC type events. I figured it was because those fellas overhaul their forks before the seals go anyway. I'm curious to hear a racer's perspective. Thanks

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  • waynus

Posted April 02, 2007 - 11:09 PM

#8

I bought a set of seal savers but thought twice about fitting them. To my way of thinking, they are pressurised against the fork leg and any crud that gets in there stays there to rub against the hard chrome.
Each to his own though

  • Snakko88

Posted April 03, 2007 - 01:20 AM

#9

I bought a set of seal savers but thought twice about fitting them. To my way of thinking, they are pressurised against the fork leg and any crud that gets in there stays there to rub against the hard chrome.
Each to his own though

I have used the seal savers for a few years now with good seal life.
I don't velcro them tight, leave them open at the back so all the crud can get out, more like a splash guard mud wipe!

  • SJMC_DON

Posted April 03, 2007 - 07:34 AM

#10

SJMC, sorry, I didn't catch where you mentioned you're own experience with greasing seals.

What's your take on seal-savers? I don't see them on many bikes in the GNCC type events. I figured it was because those fellas overhaul their forks before the seals go anyway. I'm curious to hear a racer's perspective. Thanks


It's my own and experience and level of success WITHOUT greasing them that keeps me from be speculative....

Seal savers.... I personally have never run them but I know of one race we have in the series here that is primarily a sand based soil and 3 out of 4 times I find myself blowing a seal at this particular event... the seal savers would likely help in this case :bonk:. I would consider seal savers on a case by case basis but I can't really think of negative side to them. They would just be like dust seals of course in that you would want to remove and clean underneath them, (but I would not put grease underneath them:busted:) Yes the GNCC and WORCS guys are constantly working on suspension and therefore would not be overly concerned about seal life I suppose.

  • Humunn

Posted April 03, 2007 - 08:40 PM

#11

I use both grease and seal savers. I had an expensive experience years ago that required a rebuild. Since then have followed advice from the manual and others and have not had a problem since then.

  • bergermeister

Posted April 03, 2007 - 09:49 PM

#12

Arnaud,

I've had great success with applying some waterproof grease (nothing fancy) and regularly cleaning the rubber boots.

I've been using the same set of fork seals for three years. The bike is used regularly in extremely muddy conditions. Given that I travel a lot, the bike is tied to a trailer for long distance hauling , with the forks under relativley high pressure for days on end.

Still... no blown fork seals here. This is not to say that the grease is the only reason why they never fail. I do clean the seals regularly with some film negative or a set of feeler guages.

As mentioned above, you don't need to use a fancy grease... waterproof bearing grease works for me!

Good luck mate,

Bergermeister

  • ckulzer

Posted April 05, 2007 - 06:32 AM

#13

After 2 hours of ownership, I had a leaker. After that, I took seal maintenance seriously. I now have 4 seasons on the bike - over 1800 trail/race miles (133 hours of run time) - without a failure.

I always make sure the forks are clean and I wet them with a little fork oil before a ride. I clean the fork wipers and keep the wiper filled with white lithium grease too.

  • Arnaud

Posted April 05, 2007 - 11:35 AM

#14

Hi Bergermeister (& all others!)

Thanks for your feedback. Glad to see this is not a 'standard' issue...:bonk:

I normally replace the fork-seals myself - easy job.
But doing this every year is a bit too much, I guess.
I've bought a few seal-savers (the 'real' ones, not those with velcro...) and will fit them this weekend but am convinced now that putting some grease between the fork-seal and the seal-cover makes them last much longer :naughty:

Cheers,
Arnaud.

*PS that trick with film-negative is sooo easy & really does the job!




 
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