2002 YZ426 change fork oil question. End cap.


13 replies to this topic
  • xnofriendsx

Posted March 13, 2007 - 08:01 AM

#1

Ok, sorry for sounding stupid, but a few questions on removing the end cap on my forks.
Also sorry... first time doing this.

I removed the forks from the triple clamp, etc.
I have the manual and i am following it. #1 says to unscrew the end cap.
This makes it so i can see the spring and i am supposed to put a 17mm open ended wrench in between the spacer and spring to hold.
When i do this, i can't get the end cap to loosen up.
The open ended wrench was actually a really thin one i use for my hub on my mountain bikes. A regular one was too thick.
WHat should i use? In the manual it says "thin type spanners"?
I put so much pressure trying to loosen the end cap that i noticed that where the 17mm wrench is it actually made a groove in the aluminum. So i backed off and am typing this now. I don't want to jack anything up.

Should it be this tight or difficult?
Should i put the forks in a vice and try it? Any tips?
I might have to go buy a thicker longer 17mm wrench to get more leverage.
Any thoughts?

  • 642MX

Posted March 13, 2007 - 08:27 AM

#2

Take your hand and compress the spring down and then put your 17mm wrench on the nut. Trying to fish a wrench thru the spring is hard to do.

  • grayracer513

Posted March 13, 2007 - 08:38 AM

#3

I assume you have the cap unscrewed from the fork tube, and are trying to remove the cap from the damper rod. A normal 17mm wrench works fine. Just push the spring down a little farther. Be sure to use a "combination" (box end/open end) wrench, or a longer than standard open end for leverage.

Position a wrench on the damper rod nut, and another on the fork cap so that you can get both wrench handles in one hand as if they were a pair of pliers, and so that when you squeeze the handles, the rotation will be in the right direction to loosen the nut. Squeeze. You will be much more able to control the assembly and apply pressure this way. :applause:

  • xnofriendsx

Posted March 13, 2007 - 08:40 AM

#4

That is what i am doing. I am pushing the spring down. I can't get any of my 17mm open ended wrenches in there (too thick). I had to use my other one for my mountain bike hub (too thin).
I might have to go to the hardware store and get a longer, thinner 17mm wrench.
For whatever reason, my Husky brand wrenches are too thick. It won't fit between the spacer and white plastic spring guide.

  • xnofriendsx

Posted March 13, 2007 - 08:45 AM

#5

I assume you have the cap unscrewed from the fork tube, and are trying to remove the cap from the damper rod. A normal 17mm wrench works fine. Just push the spring down a little farther. Be sure to use a "combination" (box end/open end) wrench, or a longer than standard open end for leverage.

Position a wrench on the damper rod nut, and another on the fork cap so that you can get both wrench handles in one hand as if they were a pair of pliers, and so that when you squeeze the handles, the rotation will be in the right direction to loosen the nut. Squeeze. You will be much more able to control the assembly and apply pressure this way. :applause:


Yeah, i have the cap unscrewed from the fork tube. I just can't the wrench to fit in there. Maybe it is just me. The spring guide and the spacer make it a tight fit. I can get the spring down plenty, but the space between the spring guide and the spacer is just barely too tight.
I was using a socket for the end cap though. I will try two wrenches.
That sounds better cause that is what i have to do to tighten my hubs on my mountain bike.

Then once i get this, i will probably have more questions about fork oil/weight.
I am 240lbs, 6ft 5in.
I heard using Mobil 1 ATF works fine. I am not a MXer, just trails, so i might experiment a bit on the oil height, but open to suggestions. I have read plenty of topics already on TT.

  • motobeck

Posted March 13, 2007 - 09:02 AM

#6

I have used a 17mm Craftsman wrench on my 02 many times so I know that will work for you. Like Grey said, use two wrenches positioned in a way that you can squeeze them like a pair of pliers.

  • gildnernorth101

Posted March 13, 2007 - 09:03 AM

#7

or you can just take your forks to a shop and have them done for about 100 bucks

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  • xnofriendsx

Posted March 13, 2007 - 09:20 AM

#8

or you can just take your forks to a shop and have them done for about 100 bucks


Nah, i like doing stuff myself. It is fun learning. I want to see what springs i have in them as well. The guy i bought it off last year was a pretty big guy. I am not sure if he ever got a bigger spring rate.

Thanks for the tips. I might go buy the Craftsman 17mm right now.

After this fork oil change is checking my valves clearances.

  • 1rkcooper

Posted March 13, 2007 - 09:23 PM

#9

putting your forks in a vice is not a good idea. You could quite easily ruin the fork tubes by compressing them.

  • xnofriendsx

Posted March 14, 2007 - 07:29 AM

#10

Well, i got them done last night. Thanks everyone for the tips.
I actually tried a Craftsman 17mm and it was too thick as well. Luckily Kragen was still open and i got a "thinner" 17mm (off brand). Worked great.
The 2 - 17mm's worked great.

It feels great and i am only just pushing it up and down on the ground. I did one at a time and compared it to the other fork. Huge difference. I am wondering if the oil was ever even changed at all before i bought this bike.

After i emptied all the old oil, I got about 600ml of the Mobil 1 ATF in the fork.
Does this sound about right? I am a pretty big guy and i measured it 100mm (4 inches) from the top.

Thanks again.

  • grayracer513

Posted March 14, 2007 - 08:15 AM

#11

putting your forks in a vice is not a good idea. You could quite easily ruin the fork tubes by compressing them.

Who said anything about that?

Good advice though.

I actually tried a Craftsman 17mm and it was too thick as well. Luckily Kragen was still open and i got a "thinner" 17mm (off brand). Worked great.
The 2 - 17mm's worked great.

When you are in need of a thinner than standard wrench, don't be afraid to take the step of pulling one out of the tool box and grinding the sides of the jaws down. I've done it many times. You give up the warranty, of course, but when was the last time you broke a jaw off of a high quality open end?

Your oil level sounds right, BTW. It's done strictly by level.

  • xnofriendsx

Posted March 14, 2007 - 08:20 AM

#12

Yeah, i would have grinded it, but i don't have a grinder handy that would grind steel. I could file it, but that might take a while. I could have rigged it up though somehow. I always do stuff like that.
I had mentioned earlier to just place the outer tube in a vice to hold it. Not totally squeeze it but just to barely hold it in there. That is what the guy above was talking about. But that was before you told me about the 2 - 17mm and squeeze tip. I could have just put it back in the triple clamp though.
Thanks.

  • grayracer513

Posted March 14, 2007 - 08:23 AM

#13

I looked for the vise comment and didn't find it. :eek:

The triple clamp, or an old one, is the best thing to use. :applause:

  • xnofriendsx

Posted March 14, 2007 - 08:27 AM

#14

Should i put the forks in a vice and try it? Any tips?


No worries, it was from my original post towards the bottom.





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