WR Steering Stabilizer?


20 replies to this topic

Poll: Which Stabilizer for your WR? (98 member(s) have cast votes)

Which Stabilizer for your WR?

  1. Scotts (45 votes [45.92%])

    Percentage of vote: 45.92%

  2. Voted GPR (12 votes [12.24%])

    Percentage of vote: 12.24%

  3. Voted RTT (2 votes [2.04%])

    Percentage of vote: 2.04%

  4. Voted Other Brand (please specify) (4 votes [4.08%])

    Percentage of vote: 4.08%

  5. Voted Want one, but no gotsa yet. (23 votes [23.47%])

    Percentage of vote: 23.47%

  6. Voted Stabilizer's are for wimps! (12 votes [12.24%])

    Percentage of vote: 12.24%

Vote Guests cannot vote
  • clark4131

Posted February 28, 2007 - 06:31 PM

#1

Let us know which one you like for your WR and why. I'm a Scotts man myself, with the SUB mount of course...SC

  • ffgman

Posted February 28, 2007 - 08:04 PM

#2

My scotts is on its 3rd bike and still going strong.

  • Thumper_Bloke

Posted March 01, 2007 - 08:40 AM

#3

I voted for "something else" because i don't own a steering stabilizer. I don't think they are for wimps, in fact I would like to try a WR with one installed.

  • Hot Rod Todd

Posted March 01, 2007 - 09:21 AM

#4

steering stabilizers are not necessary on wr's. we all know first hand how well our bikes ride from factory, and what is the cost of one of these anyhow? i used work in the industry and have talked with a scott rep many times about putting one on my bike, because i too have been interested in seeing what kind of improvement it could make. and i was always told by the rep that "it would be waste of money on a wr, because they already handle great without!"
SS's are not for wimps, they are for guys who like to look at their bikes in the garage!

  • clark4131

Posted March 01, 2007 - 10:24 AM

#5

steering stabilizers are not necessary on wr's. we all know first hand how well our bikes ride from factory, and what is the cost of one of these anyhow? i used work in the industry and have talked with a scott rep many times about putting one on my bike, because i too have been interested in seeing what kind of improvement it could make. and i was always told by the rep that "it would be waste of money on a wr, because they already handle great without!"
SS's are not for wimps, they are for guys who like to look at their bikes in the garage!


I've heard this same kind of argument against the necessity of 4-wheel-drive in the snow. Sure you don't NEED it, but once you have it, you'll never know how you got along without it. My Scotts has saved my bacon countless times. I don't care how good a bike handles, when your front end tank slaps due to a rock or root, the stabilizer is your best friend...SC

  • 520Roost

Posted March 01, 2007 - 10:31 AM

#6

SCOTTS,ive had it for more than 10years ,its been on 3 bikes ,but i think it will stay on my KTM (needed baddly on those)and thats blowend up:bonk:
the new WR i think does not need it (maybe if i still raced the dez):applause:

  • tony1970

Posted March 01, 2007 - 03:06 PM

#7

steering stabilizers are not necessary on wr's. we all know first hand how well our bikes ride from factory, and what is the cost of one of these anyhow? i used work in the industry and have talked with a scott rep many times about putting one on my bike, because i too have been interested in seeing what kind of improvement it could make. and i was always told by the rep that "it would be waste of money on a wr, because they already handle great without!"
SS's are not for wimps, they are for guys who like to look at their bikes in the garage!


B.S. The Scotts is the best mod I have done for my WR next to suspension mods. A steering stabilizer does not improve a bikes handling, it enhances it. Also, what kind of rep is not going to try to sell you his product?:applause:

  • clark4131

Posted March 01, 2007 - 04:52 PM

#8

I voted for "something else" because i don't own a steering stabilizer. I don't think they are for wimps, in fact I would like to try a WR with one installed.


I added another potential answer and moved your vote :applause:...SC

  • Seabass

Posted March 02, 2007 - 03:06 PM

#9

I've had my Scotts for five years. They are essential when racing, especially in the desert. Try hitting a rock while riding blind in the dust in fifth gear, it's not fun, and deadly without the damper.

  • muddyken

Posted March 04, 2007 - 12:12 PM

#10

steering stabilizers are not necessary on wr's. we all know first hand how well our bikes ride from factory, and what is the cost of one of these anyhow? i used work in the industry and have talked with a scott rep many times about putting one on my bike, because i too have been interested in seeing what kind of improvement it could make. and i was always told by the rep that "it would be waste of money on a wr, because they already handle great without!"
SS's are not for wimps, they are for guys who like to look at their bikes in the garage!



I think it all depends on what you use your beloved wr for.

if i was racing i would definitley have one cos you need the best kit available to keep you upright and to give you as much of an advantage over your opponent as possible,

but if i am out for a blast with my mates doin a bit of green laning or gettin muddy i would give this one a miss. i would rather spend the money on tyres and petrol than bolt on goodies that look good just for the sake of it. :applause:

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  • un450azul

Posted March 05, 2007 - 10:49 PM

#11

I've had my Scotts for five years. They are essential when racing, especially in the desert. Try hitting a rock while riding blind in the dust in fifth gear, it's not fun, and deadly without the damper.


I agree Seabass that when running high speed on a desert dust track a stabilizer will save your arse time and again. :applause:

Unfortunately I've had a less than pleasant experience with GPR Stabilizers the last couple of weeks. I'd spoken with their rep on the phone a couple times and was stonewalled about replacing the broken post. He said they couldn't do anything until I sent the remaining part (headstock ring that clamps on) for them to examine. I over-nighted the remaining part to GPR and got a call this afternoon. ‘Ronny’ the rep explained that the post had obviously been broken in an accident and that GPR doesn’t cover damage equipment.

Are you kidding… I ride & race a motorcycle in the desert… I fall down… a lot. JEEZ. :lol:

I explained to Ronny rep that a 3/8 dia. commercial grade tube with 1/8th wall (well maybe its 3/16) was a poor design choice and bound to break. As a mechanical engineer in steel manufacturing it was pretty evident to me, and to my colleagues, that a change in design and materials was required to the post and ring. Mr. rep explained to me that he was also an engineer and that there were other considerations such as production costs that didn’t allow for a change in the design. Man have I heard that before.

Although unspoken I believe he agreed with me that the mounting post design is poor at best and I suspect they get a lot of returns like mine.

But for a measly 90some dollars they’ll be more than happy to send an equally as crappy part in return. “You’re kidding me right?” JEEZ AGAIN :lol:

So I told Ronny rep to just send me the ring back and I’ll fix it myself. Thanks goodness I have access to a machine shop and the engineering mindset to do it right this time.

Next time I’ll know better and buy a Scotts. If you compare the materials and design between Scotts and GPR you’ll realized which is the better product. And we also know who has their engineers designing quality components and not answering the phone.

  • griffithds

Posted March 07, 2007 - 07:41 AM

#12

steering stabilizers are not necessary on wr's. we all know first hand how well our bikes ride from factory, and what is the cost of one of these anyhow? and i was always told by the rep that "it would be waste of money on a wr, because they already handle great without!"
SS's are not for wimps, they are for guys who like to look at their bikes in the garage!


I had this opinion also at one time, that was until I came flying down a sand dune at high speed and head shake set in. Scared the :applause: out of me. New 05' WR450, and yes, it was set up correctly. Installed a GPR and have never looked back. It has since saved by bacon more than once.

  • FOZZ

Posted March 08, 2007 - 08:01 PM

#13

Sorry for the semi off topic question but ive been wanting to get a Scotts for my WR Supermoto but ive been reading & heard that they work the opposite of sportbikes, pushing away from center ?? Doesnt make sense to me as I have owned Hyperpro & Ohlins dampers on sportbikes & they pull to center.. Im going to be racing SuMo so I would think I would want to pull to center not the different.. Whats the deal ?

TKS

  • jobstress

Posted March 13, 2007 - 09:18 PM

#14

Sure you don't NEED it, but once you have it, you'll never know how you got along without it. My Scotts has saved my bacon countless times...SC


I couldn't agree more. My Scotts has been on two bikes and not sure if I will ever ride without one.

  • clark4131

Posted March 16, 2007 - 08:19 AM

#15

So there you have it. Scotts is the overwhelmingly preferred damper. Not that it as a big surprise, but now we have scientific proof. I'm not sure about those of you who put in for the "wimps" response, I think you may have deep-seeded issues regarding your masculinity, but we'll figure that out later with a future poll :applause: :eek:...SC

  • Seabass

Posted March 16, 2007 - 08:43 AM

#16

Sorry for the semi off topic question but ive been wanting to get a Scotts for my WR Supermoto but ive been reading & heard that they work the opposite of sportbikes, pushing away from center ?? Doesnt make sense to me as I have owned Hyperpro & Ohlins dampers on sportbikes & they pull to center.. Im going to be racing SuMo so I would think I would want to pull to center not the different.. Whats the deal ?

TKS



I'm pretty sure Scotts sells a damper that is set up specifically for road racing/ riding.

  • bageera

Posted March 18, 2007 - 09:15 AM

#17

I was riding my 04' WR450 from Phnom Penh, Cambodia towards the Vietnamese border a few months ago, Nice day. Good weather. Looking forward to gaining some elevation and cooler weather than in the flatlands. The road I was on is paved, two full lanes wide, with one meter shoulders sloping away to rice paddies.

The rest of my group of six bikes were in front about a half a klm. I was on the edge of the right hand side of the road, on the line dividing the road and the shoulder. My Camelbak tube had blown back so I took my left hand off the bars to retrieve it and tick it back on my shoulder strap. I was running at about 115 kph. (70mph) NO BIG DEAL.

Riding on the highway, I always crank up my Scotts Stabilizer three turns. I am not afraid of head shake, a big rock, or tree roots on the highway. Dogs, pigs, and stuff that fell off a truck are a bit more worrisome. So is fatigue when I am going 500 klm a day for a week.


I glanced up from my tube retrieval process to see the whole road in front of me FILLED with car bumpers. One oncoming Land Cruiser in the other lane. One Hyundai truck in the middle passing the Cruiser. And one more Toyota sedan passing the other two taking up my lane completely.

The Toyota invading ALL my space clipped my left handlebar with it's side mirror. My hand was still off the bar, trying to get back on the bar. It happened so fast.

All I remember was saying , "Oh Jesus!" and tried to collapse on the bars for control. My WR kept it's original course with minor wobbles and no crash. My Scotts controlled the steering stem from going lock to lock, period. No road rash, no broken bones or bike parts. The only casualties were a bent connector pin between my frame and Scotts unit, and a very tweaked left hand guard. My Fasstco Flex bars were un-phased.

My point is that you don't have to be a high speed racer to face things that go very wrong while riding your bike. I have had this Scotts unit on my WR for 2.5 years and about 81,000 klm. Before that it was bolted to my 98' XR400 for 4 years and a little over 240,000 klm. I have rebuilt the Scotts once. It has saved me from real time countable disasters 12 times, and countless other "Oh God!" that was close moments.

How much does a new Scotts unit and mounting hardware cost? I paid about $600 for my original stuff for the XR. When I got the WR, I bolted on a Billet Racing top triple clamp and Fastways / Scotts mount and hand guard setup. How much is it worth to me?

Coming back home to my family in good working order is a GOOD and IMPORTANT thing. There is no substitute for good equipment and proper preparation when you go out to "mix it up."

May the Lord keep you from flat tires and broken engine parts. May He give you time to commune with Him and your favorite bike. And may He reveal to you why He gave you a heart that always wants to go fast.http://www.thumperta...es/thumbsup.gif

Dave in Cambodia

  • SXP

Posted March 18, 2007 - 03:35 PM

#18

I was riding my 04' WR450 from Phnom Penh, Cambodia towards the Vietnamese border a few months ago, Nice day. Good weather. Looking forward to gaining some elevation and cooler weather than in the flatlands. The road I was on is paved, two full lanes wide, with one meter shoulders sloping away to rice paddies.

The rest of my group of six bikes were in front about a half a klm. I was on the edge of the right hand side of the road, on the line dividing the road and the shoulder. My Camelbak tube had blown back so I took my left hand off the bars to retrieve it and tick it back on my shoulder strap. I was running at about 115 kph. (70mph) NO BIG DEAL.

Riding on the highway, I always crank up my Scotts Stabilizer three turns. I am not afraid of head shake, a big rock, or tree roots on the highway. Dogs, pigs, and stuff that fell off a truck are a bit more worrisome. So is fatigue when I am going 500 klm a day for a week.


I glanced up from my tube retrieval process to see the whole road in front of me FILLED with car bumpers. One oncoming Land Cruiser in the other lane. One Hyundai truck in the middle passing the Cruiser. And one more Toyota sedan passing the other two taking up my lane completely.

The Toyota invading ALL my space clipped my left handlebar with it's side mirror. My hand was still off the bar, trying to get back on the bar. It happened so fast.

All I remember was saying , "Oh Jesus!" and tried to collapse on the bars for control. My WR kept it's original course with minor wobbles and no crash. My Scotts controlled the steering stem from going lock to lock, period. No road rash, no broken bones or bike parts. The only casualties were a bent connector pin between my frame and Scotts unit, and a very tweaked left hand guard. My Fasstco Flex bars were un-phased.

My point is that you don't have to be a high speed racer to face things that go very wrong while riding your bike. I have had this Scotts unit on my WR for 2.5 years and about 81,000 klm. Before that it was bolted to my 98' XR400 for 4 years and a little over 240,000 klm. I have rebuilt the Scotts once. It has saved me from real time countable disasters 12 times, and countless other "Oh God!" that was close moments.

How much does a new Scotts unit and mounting hardware cost? I paid about $600 for my original stuff for the XR. When I got the WR, I bolted on a Billet Racing top triple clamp and Fastways / Scotts mount and hand guard setup. How much is it worth to me?

Coming back home to my family in good working order is a GOOD and IMPORTANT thing. There is no substitute for good equipment and proper preparation when you go out to "mix it up."

May the Lord keep you from flat tires and broken engine parts. May He give you time to commune with Him and your favorite bike. And may He reveal to you why He gave you a heart that always wants to go fast.http://www.thumperta...es/thumbsup.gif

Dave in Cambodia


Cool:thumbsup:

On my ride yesterday I too had the opportunity to pay homage to the stabilizer Gods. A must have IMHO.

  • un450azul

Posted March 18, 2007 - 06:59 PM

#19

Coming back home to my family in good working order is a GOOD and IMPORTANT thing. There is no substitute for good equipment and proper preparation when you go out to "mix it up."
Dave in Cambodia


Holy she-ite there Dave. I thought the 'baby head boulders' were tough to negotiate but dodging pigs must be a hoot. :eek:

For those not familiar with stabilizers it only takes one ride to convience someone of their value for both safety and control. :applause:

In an earlier post I voiced my concerns about GPR's quality issue(s) and I'm still having difficulty because they haven't returned the headstock clamp so I can make it work correctly (read fix).

I'm rebuilding an '03 WR from ground up and I really don't want to put a Scotts on the list... but man is it leaning that way.

Keep ya'll posted.

Ron

  • bageera

Posted March 21, 2007 - 07:56 AM

#20

We have LOTS of livestock on the highways and byways here. Cows and water buffaloes are no problem. They generally move slow, and do not have a reverse gear. Pass them on the tail end and you are good to go. Pass in front and your engine noise will likely spook them horns first right into you.

But pigs are another thing. They love to stick their fat head right between your wheel and header. Some kind of swine death wish. Pigs with a back lower than your front axle are no problem, just steady throttle and you roll over them like a dog. But bigger than that and you WILL go down. They are too dense in the middle, and will give you road rash for sure!




 
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