the rekluse


34 replies to this topic
  • torqueme

Posted February 23, 2007 - 07:56 PM

#21

I'm looking at getting the Rekluse myself. Everyone seems to like them. One of my first questions has been engine braking. If ajusted right, it brakes right. or so I'm told


If you adjust it correctly you will have engine braking all the way down to idle.

  • Terrain Rider 4z

Posted February 23, 2007 - 09:09 PM

#22

What about gearing?
I have been setting my "new to me" 04 forfiddy for woods riding. I had planned on going up two teeth on the rear and 1 down on the front. Now I'm reading all these wonderful things about the rekluse and it has me thinking hard about getting one. If I get the rekluse, should I re-gear the bike?


I would still recommend gearing because it will allow you to ride at a little higher RPMs in all situations which will help keep the clutch locked up and reduce slipping. It is very possible to waste your plates by having high gears and constantly slipping the clutch, even with the Rekluse. One mod that is not necessary with the Rekluse is a flywheel weight, but gearing is still a must :applause:

  • scott kent

Posted February 23, 2007 - 09:19 PM

#23

You still have to shift right????

  • TD-3

Posted February 24, 2007 - 04:58 AM

#24

What about gearing?
I have been setting my "new to me" 04 forfiddy for woods riding. I had planned on going up two teeth on the rear and 1 down on the front. Now I'm reading all these wonderful things about the rekluse and it has me thinking hard about getting one. If I get the rekluse, should I re-gear the bike?


I'd try it with stock gearing first, or the 50t, unless you're running in super slow 1st gear conditions all the time. Before I had the rekluse I ran a 50t and flywheel weight. With the Rekluse I went back to stock gearing.

You can also buy the heavier Ti balls for the clutch and play around with the engagement/clamping rate of the Rekluse. For spring time muddy slow conditions I will run straight steel balls. In the dry summer I've used up to 5 Ti balls in the clutch.

  • Terrain Rider 4z

Posted February 24, 2007 - 07:39 AM

#25

You can also buy the heavier Ti balls for the clutch and play around with the engagement/clamping rate of the Rekluse. For spring time muddy slow conditions I will run straight steel balls. In the dry summer I've used up to 5 Ti balls in the clutch.


The balls are made of tungsten/carbide, not titanium (which would be lighter and allow more slippage) :applause: .

None the less, when climbing hills or riding tight steep singletrack you still need to regear. This is especially true when hillclimbing in deep sand with the Rekluse.

  • TD-3

Posted February 24, 2007 - 07:58 AM

#26

The balls are made of tungsten/carbide, not titanium (which would be lighter and allow more slippage) .


:applause: I knew that they were heavier and Tungsten...that'll teach me to post before morning coffee :applause:

For my conditions, I did not need to re-gear, but I don't ride a lot of deep sand in Maine.

  • YZ426F Rider

Posted February 24, 2007 - 09:44 AM

#27

You still have to shift right????

Absolutely.

Technically, you could leave your bike in 4th or 5th all day and it would still work...but the performance would suck and you would burn up your clutch.

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  • SPLATT

Posted February 24, 2007 - 12:18 PM

#28

You still have to shift right????


Think of it as a big TTR90.

Steve

  • dnapier

Posted February 26, 2007 - 06:19 AM

#29

I put one on my 05 YZ450F last year and love it. I have engine brake all the way down to idle so I can let off the throttle in high speed fire roads and do a controlled "supermoto" slide into corners without hitting the brake just like a normal clutch.
The only time I've free-wheeled going down a hill is when I pull in the clutch going down a hill. The engine returns to idle then when you release the clutch the engine brake isn't there until you blip the throttle again. It isn't a biggie and is very easy to adjust to. It's an awesome product and the best product in my opinion!

  • yz_for_me

Posted February 26, 2007 - 11:00 AM

#30

You still have to shift right????


Yes, just like normal. It's an auto clutch, not an auto transmission.

  • motodaddycn

Posted March 01, 2007 - 01:22 PM

#31

So with the perch adjuster you still have full use of the clutch manually when you do want it???
Can you still "pop" the clutch to lift the front end over obstacles??
Thanks

  • velosapiens

Posted March 01, 2007 - 03:21 PM

#32

I have engine braking almost all the way down to idle. If you set the stall speed up properly you should not lose engine braking capabilities if you so desire.


why would you even want engine braking? one of the things good riders don't like about 4-strokes is the excessive engine braking. if you're relying on it, it means you're not learning to use the rear brake so you're going slower, and quite possibly washing out unexpectedly in tight turns. (note, i can see where engine braking could come in handy to start a slide supermoto style, at high speeds).

as for the rekluse.... some people love them, some people hate them, some people don't much care. if i were racing a big 4-stroke, i would have one but only for stall resistance, and i would keep the clutch lever, especially in technical terrain.

i have tried them, and they don't make much difference in my riding, but i'm fairly strong in rocky technical stuff as it is.

  • grayracer513

Posted March 01, 2007 - 04:08 PM

#33

"Good" riders don't like engine braking? Riders raised on 2-strokes don't like engine braking. Those of us who learned on big four strokes do like, and know how to properly use engine braking, and I wouldn't be without it. Go suggest to a Speedway rider or anyone running half-mile or mile races on the Grand National that they'd be better off without it and that maybe they're not such good riders.

You don't like it? Pull in the clutch, and you have the functional equivalent of a two-stroke.

  • RIDE 13

Posted March 04, 2007 - 03:02 PM

#34

I have an 06 450,put one in my bike.The only time I use the clutch is to put the bike in or take out of gear.I think it's one of the best mods a trail rider could ask for.As far as the track,off the line it pulls hard with max traction,corner speeds improve, You don't get nearly as tiredin a moto.The only downfall is the price$$$$

  • Mike546

Posted March 04, 2007 - 04:28 PM

#35

I put the Pro model in my 06 450F. I'll be taking it to Mototown in CT this Thursday to try it out. I think I may have to change the internal spring though, it engages just above idle. There is another that should let it slip a little more. I'll know better after a few laps. I also should have my Leatt Brace tomorrow, so I'll be checking that out too.





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