Wheel Bearing Retainer "special tool"


19 replies to this topic
  • DGXR

Posted February 01, 2007 - 09:08 AM

#1

I'm replacing the rear wheel bearings on my 1984 XR500R (maybe this should be in the vintage forum?). The Clymer manual says that a special tool is needed to remove the wheel bearing retainer on the left side of the hub. It shows Honda PNs 07910- 3000000 (wrench body) and 07710-0010100 (wrench "A"). The diagram shows a couple screws going through the wrench and into opposing holes on the bearing retainer, then you unscrew the retainer from the hub like a bolt. Anyone know about this? Can the retainer be removed safely without this "special tool." I'm riding with buddies this Saturday, speedy responses will be much appreciated! :ride:

  • creeky

Posted February 01, 2007 - 09:55 AM

#2

The bearing retainer can be a real PITA. The threads get all corroded and are very difficult to get loose. It is possible to get the retainer out with a hammer and punch, but I don't recommend it as there is a huge chance of ruining it. Some years ago I made a removal tool from an old socket by welding concrete nails (concrete nails are pretty hard) around the circumference of the socket so that the nails will slip snugly into the holes in the retainer. Soak the retainer repeatedly with Free-ALL or PB Blaster to help loosen the threads. Heating with a propane torch might help. Before trying to unscrew the retainer, place a brass drift on it and tap several times with a hammer, this will help loosen the threads also. If you have Honda dealer near you, maybe you could rent/borrow/ the special tool. Good luck.

  • cleonard

Posted February 01, 2007 - 10:35 AM

#3

I made my own "special tool." I found 2 short bolts that were the right size to fit in the holes on the retainer. I then used an old brake disc, and drilled 2 holes that had the right spacing for the holes in the retainer. I put the bolts in and checked that they fit. I welded the bolts on in mine, but you could just thread the disc holes or use a nut on the bolts. Then I used my new tool and unscrewed the retainer. I used a brake disc because it was available, a metal bar would be better.

  • ganshert

Posted February 01, 2007 - 01:33 PM

#4

can't beat having the right tool for the job

http://www.motionpro..._retainer_tool/

and under $20 too :ride:

  • tomb1957

Posted February 01, 2007 - 02:15 PM

#5

I made my own "special tool." I found 2 short bolts that were the right size to fit in the holes on the retainer. I then used an old brake disc, and drilled 2 holes that had the right spacing for the holes in the retainer. I put the bolts in and checked that they fit. I welded the bolts on in mine, but you could just thread the disc holes or use a nut on the bolts. Then I used my new tool and unscrewed the retainer. I used a brake disc because it was available, a metal bar would be better.


I made one also using a heavy steel stake. It gave me good leverage and works great.

  • dstark

Posted February 01, 2007 - 04:23 PM

#6

There should be a few punch marks locking the retainer nut in place, drill those out enough, retainer should come on out. You can use a punch and hammer but be carefull the metal is VERY soft.

  • bork

Posted February 01, 2007 - 07:10 PM

#7

I had to get a new retainer after all was said & done. Best to change the seals at same time. When my old retainer finally came out, there was aluminum stuck in threads from hub. Also, after you reassemble, put paint marks on hub & retainer. So you will be able to see if it backs out. Mine did, cause I was too scared of overtightening it & stripping out what was left of old threads on hub.

  • ridered55

Posted February 01, 2007 - 07:26 PM

#8

I just got one of these, works champ! Very well made!
http://cgi.ebay.com/...64398QQtcZphoto

  • Javelina

Posted February 01, 2007 - 07:34 PM

#9

Hey bork, btw, if you didn't put some anti-seize on the threads you'll likely get the same galling/metal transfer problem next time you do this service. If you did, good on ya, but if not, do it ASAP. Your paint mark idea is a good one to insure the retainer stays put.

  • Nailpounder

Posted February 01, 2007 - 07:35 PM

#10

can't beat having the right tool for the job

http://www.motionpro..._retainer_tool/

and under $20 too :ride:


I have to agree with having the right tool for the job. It's not worth the time or the effort trying to rig something up.

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  • cleonard

Posted February 01, 2007 - 08:06 PM

#11

I have to agree with having the right tool for the job. It's not worth the time or the effort trying to rig something up.


It depends on the situation. For me it was 7pm on a Friday night. I had a fried bearing in my rear wheel. I had picked up a new bearing that afternoon on my way home from work. I wanted to ride in the morning. I wasn't going to let the lack of the "proper" tool prevent me from hitting the trail early the next morning. My homemade tool works great. It was definitely worth my time. I have made several special tools over the years for my cars,trucks, bikes and boats. Usually special tools have an extra digit in the price than this one. For $20 it's a good buy.

  • bork

Posted February 04, 2007 - 06:23 PM

#12

I cant remember if I put on any thing on the threads. I did have to change bearings again since the 1st time. (came apart ok)I'm tempted to pay the extra $$ for stainless steel bearings. I think water & grit get in & the rust makes it prematurely fail.

  • xr650l bum

Posted February 04, 2007 - 06:47 PM

#13

How do you know when a bearing is fried? I have several sets of wheels. I change them often depending on what terrain I am riding. I lube the snot out of the axles and such every time. I am always concerned considering some of the wheels and bearings are very old. Whenever I put them on I spin them and see how freely the spin and listen for any rubbing grinding noise.

  • creeky

Posted February 04, 2007 - 07:20 PM

#14

How do you know when a bearing is fried? .



The wheel will be loose. Grab the tire and shake the wheel back and forth, if it moves on the axle, the bearing is shot. I have found that a double sealed bearing lasts longer. Before installation, I pop off one of the seals, wipe the factory grease out as best I can and repack with moly wheel bearing grease then replace the seal.

  • cleonard

Posted February 04, 2007 - 10:48 PM

#15

How do you know when a bearing is fried? I have several sets of wheels. I change them often depending on what terrain I am riding. I lube the snot out of the axles and such every time. I am always concerned considering some of the wheels and bearings are very old. Whenever I put them on I spin them and see how freely the spin and listen for any rubbing grinding noise.


As a Californian you may never learn the skill of changing bearings. As far as I can tell the bearings last a very long time as long as they don't get wet. Water kills them. Most OEM wheel bearings are only sealed on one side. It inside part is open. When you put the hub underwater it can get inside the hub and attack them from the inside.

  • bork

Posted February 05, 2007 - 06:28 AM

#16

I was trying to think of a way to put a grease fitting in the hub with slight pressure like a buddy bearing, & fill up hub. We can be like subs down here.

  • cleonard

Posted February 05, 2007 - 08:25 AM

#17

I was trying to think of a way to put a grease fitting in the hub with slight pressure like a buddy bearing, & fill up hub. We can be like subs down here.


I've seen bike where the owner drilled a hole and installed a grease fitting on the head tube. I don't see why you couldn't do the same on the hub. Just drill a hole and put a grease fitting there. The only issue is access between the spokes.

  • creeky

Posted February 05, 2007 - 09:43 AM

#18

I've seen bike where the owner drilled a hole and installed a grease fitting on the head tube. I don't see why you couldn't do the same on the hub. Just drill a hole and put a grease fitting there. The only issue is access between the spokes.


I used to do this until I started using double sealed bearings. Now, I just coat the axle liberally with anti-seize when installing.

  • bork

Posted February 07, 2007 - 08:35 PM

#19

I coulda sworn the bearings I replaced the second time had double seals. Because I purchased them from a local bearing house.

  • cleonard

Posted February 08, 2007 - 11:12 AM

#20

I coulda sworn the bearings I replaced the second time had double seals. Because I purchased them from a local bearing house.


The double sided ones are much more common than the single sided ones. Most bearing stores just don't stock the single sided ones. I have a hard time understanding why they even used the single sided ones. Maybe they are 5 cents cheaper or something.





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