Steering dampener's


18 replies to this topic
  • h20mn

Posted December 22, 2006 - 08:39 AM

#1

First off I would like to say Hi. I am new to this site and now that my kids are in college the wife and I have started riding again after about 25 years. I bought a 06 wr 450 and my wife has the Honda 230, she likes red instead of blue. for the most part we ride fire roads in the Tahoe area and the upper desert's outside of southern Ca. We are not trail burners my no means. What my question is Would we benefit by having steering dampeners put on our bikes. I have read past post on what they do and how they work but I get the impression these folks are alot faster riders that we are. Thanks for any info.

  • Bladerunner426

Posted December 22, 2006 - 09:03 AM

#2

A stabilizer would probably help no matter what, but you shod ask yourself if that help is worth the money. I have a GPR and would not own another bike without one again.

  • Punisher660

Posted December 22, 2006 - 10:09 AM

#3

I disagree on this one. The biggest advantage to a stabalizer is when riding at speed. Most of us turn ours all the way down or off when riding tight trails, so if they are just putting along on fire roads, where is the benefit?

  • WGP

Posted December 22, 2006 - 10:17 AM

#4

I would save your money, they are expensive.

For trailriding they will have little benefit......best for MX or Fast Desert riding.

I would put your money into good protective gear....

  • Jwar1r1t3

Posted December 22, 2006 - 11:40 AM

#5

Yeah, the stabilizers will only help you when you are barreling through rough terrain at high speed. The best upgrade to get that will improve; Handling, lessen rider fatigue, and make for a much better ride is to have your suspension re-sprung and re-valved by a suspension expert. There is no comparison between the ride stock, and new suspension. Suspension will probably be the same amount of money but will cure everything and more than a stabilizer.

If the suspension is too much, I would suggest softer, more comfortable seats, wider foot pegs, etc to lessen fatigue and aid in comfort. And you will need it on that WR. lol I just got one myself and that seat is not the most comfortable, and to add more, I used to ride a living room chair, XR 250. That seat is great.

Pretty much anything to aid in comfort, like rain gear, cold weather gear, protective gear, or anything to make your trail riding easier like special tools or a really nice pair of goggles.

One last thing, if you ride long distances on those fire roads, a larger gas tank for that WR. Mine will get approximatly 50-60 miles on one tank, while my XR 250 used to get around 100.

Other than that, just little stuff to make things easier or more convienient.

  • clark4131

Posted December 22, 2006 - 12:48 PM

#6

I'm going to humbly disagree with the "high speed" guys. I ride primarily singletrack and have found my Scotts to be invaluable. That thing has saved my bacon so many times, I can't even begin to hazard a guess. With rocks, roots and DG all over the place, it's a true life-saver. I'd have to say it's money well spent regardless...SC

  • Jwar1r1t3

Posted December 22, 2006 - 01:05 PM

#7

I'm going to humbly disagree with the "high speed" guys. I ride primarily singletrack and have found my Scotts to be invaluable. That thing has saved my bacon so many times, I can't even begin to hazard a guess. With rocks, roots and DG all over the place, it's a true life-saver. I'd have to say it's money well spent regardless...SC


I am only speaking about high speed from experience. I never felt the need for a steering stabilizer until I was going very fast through the stuff you mentioned. But actually I didn't even consider getting one because it is a lot of money that only helps one aspect of the handling. IMO

I feel that well tuned suspension is a much better upgrade than the stabilizer. I will say no more, as this topic usually ends up in a pretty heated discussion.:devil: :smirk: :thumbsup:

  • h20mn

Posted December 22, 2006 - 02:20 PM

#8

Thanks for all the input, I think I will start with my wife's bike, She has trouble when we are going down a trail and it's turns to soft sand

  • tony1970

Posted December 22, 2006 - 05:15 PM

#9

I'm going to humbly disagree with the "high speed" guys. I ride primarily singletrack and have found my Scotts to be invaluable. That thing has saved my bacon so many times, I can't even begin to hazard a guess. With rocks, roots and DG all over the place, it's a true life-saver. I'd have to say it's money well spent regardless...SC


Agree. A stabilizer helps a lot in slow speed rocky and root infested trails.:thumbsup:

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  • MN_Paul

Posted December 22, 2006 - 05:55 PM

#10

I dont think a stabilizer would help much with soft sand. (correct me if this is not true). Sand is challenging to learn to ride. One thing you could try for your wife is to drop the rear or raise the front. This will add stability when in the soft stuff at the expense of not being quite as responsive on hard surfaces.

Paul

  • clark4131

Posted December 22, 2006 - 06:11 PM

#11

My Scotts also works well in sand. Hell, I might just trade my wife in for a second one...SC

  • Fullbore4

Posted December 22, 2006 - 06:29 PM

#12

One thing you could try for your wife is to drop the rear or raise the front. This will add stability when in the soft stuff at the expense of not being quite as responsive on hard surfaces.

Paul


hmmmmm......maybe that's my problem!:thumbsup:

  • kirkw

Posted December 22, 2006 - 09:05 PM

#13

I ride in the same areas. I struggled with this decision for a long time. But now with a couple years experience with my Scott's, I can say this is one of the best things I ever did upgrade wise. Even in the slow tight single track. It is one of those things that once installed you really wonder if there is a difference and then you swap to a bike without one and think the front tire is flat or on ball bearings. Intimately knowing the trails in North Tahoe and 89 corridor, as well as some selected Nevada desert, I think that it will make you both more comfortable, as well as faster. Again, the later may not be your objective but the sense of additional control is well worth it in my mind.:thumbsup:

  • NavyNuke

Posted December 23, 2006 - 01:16 AM

#14

steering damper is one of my next upgrades, but the $$$ to get it will make it take longer

  • jaymo

Posted December 23, 2006 - 04:27 AM

#15

I dont think a stabilizer would help much with soft sand. (correct me if this is not true). Sand is challenging to learn to ride. One thing you could try for your wife is to drop the rear or raise the front. This will add stability when in the soft stuff at the expense of not being quite as responsive on hard surfaces.

Paul


I find my Scotts helps in the sand. The bike doesn't "wander" as much. I ride 90% single track that is made up of rock, roots, and sand. My Damper is always on. Now when I ride a bike without one it feels sloppy. Probably the best single purchase I've made.

  • byggd

Posted December 23, 2006 - 06:36 AM

#16

First off I would like to say Hi. I am new to this site and now that my kids are in college the wife and I have started riding again after about 25 years. I bought a 06 wr 450 and my wife has the Honda 230, she likes red instead of blue. for the most part we ride fire roads in the Tahoe area and the upper desert's outside of southern Ca. We are not trail burners my no means. What my question is Would we benefit by having steering dampeners put on our bikes. I have read past post on what they do and how they work but I get the impression these folks are alot faster riders that we are. Thanks for any info.

I ride the rocky fire roads, single track, mountain trails of so cal as well and I agree with SC.

I'm going to humbly disagree with the "high speed" guys. I ride primarily singletrack and have found my Scotts to be invaluable. That thing has saved my bacon so many times, I can't even begin to hazard a guess. With rocks, roots and DG all over the place, it's a true life-saver. I'd have to say it's money well spent regardless...SC


The Scotts has two adjustments, one for high speed AND one for lower speeds and has saved by butt countless times.

  • handlebar

Posted December 23, 2006 - 06:45 AM

#17

A steering damper will make your bike FEEL and handle better even with poor suspension but since you are just getting into the sport I would spend my money on good safety equipment first .then suspension next then perhaps a steering damper. I would also buy the Scotts damper. It is a much better unit than the GPR. For the GPR to work you just have to turn it up to high and if you get into anything tight it will pump up your arms.The Scotts damper you will barely know it is there. IMO a properly set up bike suspension wise will hardly need a steering damper but if you do add one it is the iceing on the cake. Properly setup suspension for your weight and ability is the most important and proper first step then the Scotts.

  • h20mn

Posted December 23, 2006 - 08:57 AM

#18

Thanks again to all that replied, we have all the safety gear, stoped at a suspension shop he recomended that we start with the dampener's and then the suspension for our type of riding might not need a full blown rework job he said to do it in stages so that we could really feel and tell the difference in what we do
Merry Christmas to all

  • Tsk350

Posted December 23, 2006 - 03:42 PM

#19

My Scotts also works well in sand. Hell, I might just trade my wife in for a second one...SC


You can do that?! Im willing to make that trade! Where do I place my order? And im also curious what can I trade the kids in for?:thumbsup: :devil:




 
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