Will an aftermarket triple clamp help? o6 450


26 replies to this topic
  • jgerdi

Posted December 20, 2006 - 07:46 AM

#1

I still have another month before I can ride again, broken hip . I'm thinking about getting myself a set of triple clamps for x-mas and was wondering if the $$/benefit was worth it. I can't find the article but I beleave it said the applied 27m top and bottom set improved the 06 450's cornering.

  • Ranger18

Posted December 20, 2006 - 08:06 AM

#2

I'm no expert but that sounds backwords. The stock clamp is 25mm and some people talk about going to a 24mm, but I would find something else to spend my money on, because unless your Pro I doubt you need the clamps. I still have the stock front tire on my bike and I can get my 06 turning so well you would think it was on rails, I have never been on a bike that turned as well as this bike. Granted I have never been on an 07, but I cant imagine that with my skill (far from great) that I would get it to turn any better than my 06.
If your having trouble turning, I would look into new tires, check your tire pressure (I like 12-13lbs for my track), make sure your suspension is set for your weight, and your sag is correct. All of these make a huge difference even the tire pressure.

  • jgerdi

Posted December 20, 2006 - 08:19 AM

#3

You're probably right. There is no magic fix to poor riding, but sometimes when looking at all the bling you start believing in Santa Claus and the Easter Bunny. I do run my tire preasure around 15-16 becouse of a family vacation at durhamtown when i changed abunch of flats on hard pack with rocks.

  • Yamahafan

Posted December 20, 2006 - 10:25 AM

#4

I believe the consenus is to raise the forks in the triple clamps to the line (which lowers the front-end) and setting the rear shock race sag at 95 to 98 mm, (which raises the rear-end) shifting more weight on to the front-end. This is essentially what Yamaha did with the 2007's by making the rear shock shaft 1.5mm longer.

Don't forget to measure race sag by STANDING ON YOUR PEGS with your full equipment on (or wearing a backpack with the same amount of weight). Lean your handlebars against the wall or have a buddy support the bike.
Race sag = distance from rear axle to rear fender mark with suspension unloaded (bike on a stand) - distance from rear axle to rear fender mark with suspension loaded (race-ready rider on pegs).

  • sic

Posted December 20, 2006 - 11:16 AM

#5

Yeah, I agree. I raced my '06 450 every weekend in 2006 and I think it steers poorly. I did all the mods, tire, raised forks, sag recommendation, raised bars. That certainly improves things but its a pusher for sure. You fool yourself into thinking it does not push (like all season) until you switch bikes then go back to your own. When you do that its like "wow" this is bad.

I, too, am interested in the 22mm offset RG3 clamps. User "RCannon" has used them to GREAT EFFECT on the YZ250 (2-stroke). Interestingly, its the same RG3 part. Would love to hear some '06 YZ450 feedback too before I order them for XMAS. Otherwise.... goodbye YZ450 for next season. I cannot deal with this any longer and will be on another bike.

Sic

  • Huckster

Posted December 20, 2006 - 11:43 AM

#6

I spoke to a NESC expert this morning who ran an '06 with RG3 22's last year and he said it made a big difference. With that said, he said that the '07 is better stock than the '06 was with the clamps.

  • racerxx276

Posted December 20, 2006 - 12:40 PM

#7

I have an 06 yz450f and went through the same issue of putting on clamps. RG3 says 22 mm- applied says 24 mm. I've tried both and I have the 24 mm applied on my bike now. You would think 1 mm wouldn't make that much of a difference bit , but the bike corners amazing well now over stock... my .02

  • jgerdi

Posted December 20, 2006 - 01:01 PM

#8

?? what is the stock off set ??

  • Ranger18

Posted December 20, 2006 - 01:35 PM

#9

?? what is the stock off set ??


Stock offset is 25mm.
By the way you should really lower your tire pressure to 12-13lbs. I have tested the difference between a near flat tire, 12lbs, and 15lbs. And let me tell you a flat tire grabs real hard, and the 15lbs pushes real hard. I am content with 12-13 lbs. You can buy a low pressure guage at any MX shop for $20.
If you really want to find out how well the 06 handles, go ride a honda crf450 then get back on yzf.
If you are dead set on spending some money on clamps, then I would go with the 24mm, I have heard from a few people that they make it turn even better. If you went with 22mm clamps you might experiance some head shake. Another option is to see about getting the rear shock for an 07 yzf. In theary it would make the 06 and 07 the same.

  • StPeters21

Posted December 20, 2006 - 02:35 PM

#10

i could be wrong.....but, I thought that you would want the 27mm clamps to make it turn better?.?.? Someone expain (I'm confused)

I will prob get clamps also.

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  • brian389

Posted December 20, 2006 - 02:37 PM

#11

I am 6'1" tall, so went with a Topar Racing top clamp that pushes the bars forward 3/4 of an inch, and run the forks about 1/8" past the mark on the forks, making the front end steeper. D952 at 12.5 lbs pressure. No wash-out, no head-shake, corners fine. When it breaks loose, it tends to be both ends of bike evenly. Having tall bars further forward weight the front end also.

  • tmauto69

Posted December 20, 2006 - 06:55 PM

#12

I have the 22mm RG3's on my '06. It turns good,(not as good as an RMZ but still good) and has no headshake. Buy them, you will like them. :thumbsup:

  • grayracer513

Posted December 20, 2006 - 07:25 PM

#13

I spoke to a NESC expert this morning who ran an '06 with RG3 22's last year and he said it made a big difference. With that said, he said that the '07 is better stock than the '06 was with the clamps.

This statement shows how poorly the whole thing is understood, and why the opinion of "expert riders" is quite often worthless. I'm not disputing their riding ability, just saying that riding skill has no correlation to one's ability analyze any aspect of motorcycle performance whatsoever.

The sticking point in this, for me, is that there is nearly no difference at all between the '06 and '07 in the first place, other than that the '07 comes set up the way most people set up their '06's after they got them.

Having run offset clamps on an '03, and having ridden a number of other bikes with and without such an offset, I'm familiar with the effect they have, and I can tell you that a properly set up '06 has no handling fault that could be fixed by such a major change in trail as a 2.5mm decrease in fork offset would produce. It turns willingly, tracks well through almost anything, and seldom kicks the front wheel on a rock strike, etc., and generally handles in a beautifully neutral manner.

Applied ran true blind tests with a group of competent riders they selected on both the '06 YZF's. The group that tested the YZ250F did actually prefer the 27mm offset on that motorcycle, and that makes perfect sense to me. Reducing trail helps a bike steer more neutrally and track better leaving a corner under power. But the group that tested the YZ450 preferred the 24mm offset. That's very close to the stock 25mm figure. So close that it frankly seems difficult to believe that any but a very few riders around would be able to select the 24 over the stock 25 consistently over a series of such tests, or that most of us would know the difference at all. OTOH, Doug Dubach, whose analytic abilities are well known, and may exceed his skills as a rider, does say he likes the 24mm offset best, so there may be something to it.

But I would be extremely reluctant to spend $400+ to make any such change to an '06 YZ450F without trying it myself first, which is why I would recommend buying or borrowing a Rekluse E-Axle so you can try out different offsets and compare the results for yourself without all the commitment in time and money that a whole set of clamps involves.

If not, then go with either the 24mm that Dubach and Applied recommend, or with the stock 25mm. The idea that a bike that handles as well as the the '06 YZ450 does would need such a huge adjustment to its steering geometry as a 2.5mm reduction in fork offset is, IMO, just plain silly.

  • stroker101

Posted December 20, 2006 - 08:35 PM

#14

i tried setting the fork height,tire pressure, tire brand, suspension adjustments. but still found that by installing the applied 27mm top/bottom clamps helped my turning tremendously. i feel that it was $300 well spent. installing the ebc 220mm front brake rotor and magura clutch was $$$ well spent as well :thumbsup:

good write up grayracer513

  • Huckster

Posted December 21, 2006 - 04:34 AM

#15

This statement shows how poorly the whole thing is understood, and why the opinion of "expert riders" is quite often worthless. I'm not disputing their riding ability, just saying that riding skill has no correlation to one's ability analyze any aspect of motorcycle performance whatsoever.
The sticking point in this, for me, is that there is nearly no difference at all between the '06 and '07 in the first place, other than that the '07 comes set up the way most people set up their '06's after they got them.

Having run offset clamps on an '03, and having ridden a number of other bikes with and without such an offset, I'm familiar with the effect they have, and I can tell you that a properly set up '06 has no handling fault that could be fixed by such a major change in trail as a 2.5mm decrease in fork offset would produce. It turns willingly, tracks well through almost anything, and seldom kicks the front wheel on a rock strike, etc., and generally handles in a beautifully neutral manner.

Applied ran true blind tests with a group of competent riders they selected on both the '06 YZF's. The group that tested the YZ250F did actually prefer the 27mm offset on that motorcycle, and that makes perfect sense to me. Reducing trail helps a bike steer more neutrally and track better leaving a corner under power. But the group that tested the YZ450 preferred the 24mm offset. That's very close to the stock 25mm figure. So close that it frankly seems difficult to believe that any but a very few riders around would be able to select the 24 over the stock 25 consistently over a series of such tests, or that most of us would know the difference at all. OTOH, Doug Dubach, whose analytic abilities are well known, and may exceed his skills as a rider, does say he likes the 24mm offset best, so there may be something to it.

But I would be extremely reluctant to spend $400+ to make any such change to an '06 YZ450F without trying it myself first, which is why I would recommend buying or borrowing a Rekluse E-Axle so you can try out different offsets and compare the results for yourself without all the commitment in time and money that a whole set of clamps involves.

If not, then go with either the 24mm that Dubach and Applied recommend, or with the stock 25mm. The idea that a bike that handles as well as the the '06 YZ450 does would need such a huge adjustment to its steering geometry as a 2.5mm reduction in fork offset is, IMO, just plain silly.


While your are surely entitled to your opinion, it is just that, an opinion. You seem to be very knowledgable but I have to respectfully disagree with your first statement referencing this individual. I do not wish to get into a debate over who is a more qualified "tester" but the person who I spoke to has raced at a National level for more than 10 years and has done suspension testing for a major suspension company. I am pretty confident in his opinion to be able to understand and differentiate small changes in bike set up. However, it is just his opinion as well and you can take what you want from it.

  • Yamahafan

Posted December 21, 2006 - 08:26 AM

#16

i tried setting the fork height,tire pressure, tire brand, suspension adjustments. but still found that by installing the applied 27mm top/bottom clamps helped my turning tremendously. i feel that it was $300 well spent. installing the ebc 220mm front brake rotor and magura clutch was $$$ well spent as well :thumbsup:

good write up grayracer513


Do you mean 22mm offset? I thought 27mm was for the 250Fs and 22 or 24mm offset was for the 450s.

By the way, Motocross Action mentions getting taller bars, but nothing about offest triple clamps in their review of the 2006 YZ450F.

http://www.motocross...92CB8876BD9F591

  • Ranger18

Posted December 21, 2006 - 11:16 AM

#17

Do you mean 22mm offset? I thought 27mm was for the 250Fs and 22 or 24mm offset was for the 450s.

By the way, Motocross Action mentions getting taller bars, but nothing about offest triple clamps in their review of the 2006 YZ450F.

http://www.motocross...92CB8876BD9F591


Thats becuase they're really not needed. IMHO

  • Ga426owner

Posted December 21, 2006 - 01:04 PM

#18

Thats becuase they're really not needed. IMHO



agreed but with a caveat. My 06 does not push...I think it is due to bike set up and the way you ride/corner that dictates whether or not the offset clamps are truely needed on a 06. As well as a front tire that has correct traction for the terrain on the track.....a 739 has no traction in my area at all

  • YzGuy79

Posted December 21, 2006 - 08:25 PM

#19

When people talk about different offset clamps, they are talking about changing the psoition of the forks, right? Not just the bars? So you need to buy both clamps to achieve this?

  • Ranger18

Posted December 22, 2006 - 08:51 AM

#20

When people talk about different offset clamps, they are talking about changing the psoition of the forks, right? Not just the bars? So you need to buy both clamps to achieve this?


Yes. By changing offset, you are moving the forks closer or further away from the frame . Ex. Stock is 25mm. If you got 22mm clamps then the forks/tire would be closer to the bike. If you got 27mm then they would be further away. One thing they do not do is change the head angle of the bike,nor does it displace weight any; and that is what yamaha did to the 07 by placing a longer shock on the rear. This effect can be acomplished by buying a storm rear linkage or possible buying an 07 rear shock. They will slightly change the head angle bu moving the rear of the bike up. This also transfers some of the weight forward.





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