Paddle tires


18 replies to this topic
  • biggercb

Posted December 20, 2006 - 06:02 AM

#1

I have never ridden a bike with a paddle. I was planning a trip to Wynoka soon. Is a day on the dunes that much better with a paddle? Is it worth it?

  • Ranger18

Posted December 20, 2006 - 08:15 AM

#2

I don't know if your dunes are like glamis dunes, but it is possible to ride the dunes with out a paddle, but it's alot better with a paddle, and yes it's worth buying a paddle. If you have a 250f for with a kings turbo 6 paddle. If you have a 450f grab the kings turbo 8 paddle. There are other companies that make paddles, but in my opinion Kings are the best. Some people run the front slick tire, bt like most other people, I don't. The front slick eliminated some of the high speed head shake you'd get from a knobie. Have fun and get a flag for the dunes.

  • AlkalineOne

Posted December 20, 2006 - 06:38 PM

#3

i took two yz400f's out to pismo last season, one with a paddle and one without, and there was a huge difference. yea its possible to ride without the paddle, but it will feel like the bike has half the power. i know for sure that i wouldn't go without one again.

  • biggercb

Posted December 21, 2006 - 07:25 AM

#4

Thanks for the responses, thats what I was looking for.

  • DrThumper

Posted December 21, 2006 - 11:59 AM

#5

Paddles will ruin your bike. Unless you got a 500cc 2 stroke I wouldn't use 'em.

Unless you like to rebuild engines alot.

  • biggercb

Posted December 21, 2006 - 12:12 PM

#6

Are you saying that a paddle will put excess strain on the engine?

  • Ranger18

Posted December 21, 2006 - 01:40 PM

#7

Paddles will ruin your bike. Unless you got a 500cc 2 stroke I wouldn't use 'em.

Unless you like to rebuild engines alot.


I don't think that statment is correct. Yes riding in sand ads a little more stress to the drive line, and clutch, It isn't going to destroy your bike. I recommend lowering your gear ratio a couple of teath (going two teeth larger on the rear sprocket) another improtant factor is getting the right tire. The kings that I mentioned are probably the best out there and as long as you run the correct amount of cups you should be O.K.
One other thing... Riding sand is alot different than dirt, and it can be very hard on your bike if you don't ride it correctly. An example of this is try to not stop alot, especially on an uphill. If you do stall it going up a dune, turn the bike around and get it going down the dune again. The part that stresses the bike the most is getting going, everyhting after that is fine. Also keep an eye on your chain and sprockets; they will get stretched and worn out. Make sure you readjust them every day. And most important is keep your air filter clean. (I use filterskins)

  • katoom525sx

Posted December 21, 2006 - 05:50 PM

#8

Don't forget to remind him that you can't lay the bike over like you can with a regular tire there is no grip on the side of the tire.

  • ISBB

Posted December 21, 2006 - 07:15 PM

#9

Paddles will ruin your bike. Unless you got a 500cc 2 stroke I wouldn't use 'em.

Unless you like to rebuild engines alot.



Sorry but i have to call BS on this one. :thumbsup:

What destroy's a motor is lack of maintinance. Dont keep up with your motor and it will fail. That being said. I have had a paddle on my bike for 3 years straight. Thats right i dont ride in the dirt strictly sand. I have not had ONE SINGLE ENGINE FAILURE YET! Maintenance routine is as follows:

--Change oil Every HARD WEEKEND ( i judge by gas if i burn 10 gallons of gas in one weekend thats alot of riding) if not i will change it every other trip to the dunes.

--CLEAN air filter every weekend of riding and sometimes throw a ready filter in the truck just incase i need to do a quick swap while at the dunes if i eat it and the air box gets full of sand.

--Clean and lube chain ocasionally :devil: RK520XSO likes to be treated dirty dont know why but an ocasional lubing and washing of the chain and its fine.

and thats it.. Just keep up on proper maintenance and you will have no trouble with your engine. Do not get me wrong riding in the sand does take alot more power than riding on the dirt. The motor does have to work harder which is why you have to take extra precaution with your maintenance routines.

The paddle I run is as suggested above which is the Kings Turbo Paddle 8 cup in a 110/100-18 and their front rib tire ( that thing is awesome ) Both are availible via the TT store as well another plus since im pretty close to some good dunes and go thru paddles regularly. Allthough the 6cup vs 8cup debate ehhh I honestly think a 8cup will be fine on a 250/250f anything smaller and 6cup is all there is too it. Anything larger than a 400/426 then a 10 cup is optional. I have ridden 450's with a 10 cup and its nice and i have ridden them with 8 cups and it slips a little more, that part is all dependant on your riding style. The fewer cups the more the tire will spin. The more cups the more the bike will hook up. Typical rule of thumb is 8psi front and rear. If you need a little more slippage then up the psi and you will be good. If you run your front tire at 15psi like you would in the dirt you will hate life in the sand. Ever try riding a bicycle in the sand this is just as bad but you get the same effect.

In the sand your riding style is going to change just a little. Your going to end up sitting back more to get the weight off the front end so it will float better and not get all squirly on you. And last but not least.. When in doubt throttle out :smirk:

That is all.. back to your regular forum posting :smirk:

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  • MacJammer

Posted December 21, 2006 - 07:33 PM

#10

Echo! There is no substitute for a paddle in the sand. I love the cheng shin sand pro. it has big meaty rap around hooks and nothing between the hooks which allows me to us my power to spin the rear wheel and turn sharper in the sand. The sand pro is my vote for price as well. $40. bucks and you are in business.

  • katoom525sx

Posted December 21, 2006 - 08:10 PM

#11

O ya don't forget ........Make sure you are not lean on the main

  • AlkalineOne

Posted December 21, 2006 - 10:35 PM

#12

Don't forget to remind him that you can't lay the bike over like you can with a regular tire there is no grip on the side of the tire.


strang.... i found that i could lay the bike down further in the sand with a paddle than in the dirt with a nobby. you just have to be going faster than 10mph or so:thumbsup:

  • Ranger18

Posted December 22, 2006 - 08:41 AM

#13

O ya don't forget ........Make sure you are not lean on the main


:thumbsup: Great point. Make sure your jetting is spot on, then go one size richer on the main, or give it a little extra twist on the air/fuel screw (richer) . Because the sand takes more power away from your bike it causes it to get hotter, and if you are lean then you will have problems, better to be a little rich.
I run engine ice in my bikes all the time, so that might be something to consider as well.

And ISBB, well written - good points.

  • mkporn

Posted December 22, 2006 - 10:18 AM

#14

Din't see that anyone said anything about this so I will.

don't go to the dunes and change to a paddle there or do the work at the last minute, due to the fact that there is a good chance your chain will not be long enough depending on where you run it now. This definitely will be the case if you add a larger rear sprocket.

The only reason I say this is because I have seen several people do exactly that. They end up having to run around with their head cut off looking for extra links or a new chain.

One other thing is the flag issue. Most places require it so run it. If you get a swing arm axle bolt mounted type, drill a hole in your rear fender at the edge and loop a zip tie thru it and aroung the flag pole. Otherwise you will be fixing your flag every 15 minutes.

Now if you have access to a welder and a bit of scrap steel, you can make a mount that will fit behind the muffler mount that is less likely to break the flag and it will not have to be connected to your swing arm.

If anyone wants to see this, send me a PM and I will send a picture. This is a slick deal and it will save you a tone of flags. I have been running the same flag for 3 yrs now and it still is leagally long enough.

  • biggercb

Posted December 26, 2006 - 07:19 AM

#15

Thanks for all the tips.

  • ISBB

Posted December 28, 2006 - 03:05 PM

#16

Din't see that anyone said anything about this so I will.

don't go to the dunes and change to a paddle there or do the work at the last minute, due to the fact that there is a good chance your chain will not be long enough depending on where you run it now. This definitely will be the case if you add a larger rear sprocket.

The only reason I say this is because I have seen several people do exactly that. They end up having to run around with their head cut off looking for extra links or a new chain.

One other thing is the flag issue. Most places require it so run it. If you get a swing arm axle bolt mounted type, drill a hole in your rear fender at the edge and loop a zip tie thru it and aroung the flag pole. Otherwise you will be fixing your flag every 15 minutes.

Now if you have access to a welder and a bit of scrap steel, you can make a mount that will fit behind the muffler mount that is less likely to break the flag and it will not have to be connected to your swing arm.

If anyone wants to see this, send me a PM and I will send a picture. This is a slick deal and it will save you a tone of flags. I have been running the same flag for 3 yrs now and it still is leagally long enough.


You my friend make some very good points... I too have seen the running around cuz their chain wasnt long enough..

as for the flag you wont be fixing it every 15 minutes you will be buying a new one every 15 minutes. I have had the zip ty method on my bike for over a season and on the same whip... Without the zip ty if i was careful i might get 3 or 4 rides out of a whip before the paddle ate it!

  • YZ426F Rider

Posted December 28, 2006 - 04:12 PM

#17

I've never done any real sand riding but I am planning a trip to the Oregon coast in a couple months.

Should I take my RM250 or my YZ426? I'm thinking the torque of the 426 would be better but I have no experience with sand so I'd like to get the thoughts of somebody that knows sand riding.

  • Twig323

Posted December 28, 2006 - 08:27 PM

#18

I see that some of you have put some input on which paddle you prefer. Iwould like to know if anyone has ridden the Maxxis Sand paddle i cant remeber the name of it but i remember them selling them at a WORCS race up here in Washington but know they are no where to be found...

  • BergArabia

Posted December 29, 2006 - 04:18 AM

#19

I've never done any real sand riding but I am planning a trip to the Oregon coast in a couple months.

Should I take my RM250 or my YZ426? I'm thinking the torque of the 426 would be better but I have no experience with sand so I'd like to get the thoughts of somebody that knows sand riding.


I'd go with the larger bike. Sand tends to soak up horsepower. So you will appreciate the extra available.
I use a paddle tire on my YZ450 and it is great in the sand.. Fantastic in fact.. I thoroughly recommend it..





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